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March 28, 2014
mssnglnk:

Hard hitting news.

I hope the stipple artist got paid millions of dollars.

mssnglnk:

Hard hitting news.

I hope the stipple artist got paid millions of dollars.

20:17 // 4 months ago
May 26, 2013
The WSJ has a story about the cottage industry around Daft Punk  replica helmets. And oh yes, there’s a stipple print. 
(Side note: Their new album is pretty awesome if you haven’t heard.)

The WSJ has a story about the cottage industry around Daft Punk  replica helmets. And oh yes, there’s a stipple print

(Side note: Their new album is pretty awesome if you haven’t heard.)

11:01 // 1 year ago
January 18, 2013
robot-heart-politics:

thepeoplesrecord:

In 1983 there were 50 different corporations that had control over our media, today there are only six: Viacom, Comcast, Disney, TimeWarner, CBS, and News Corporation. 

Is anyone surprised by this?

For what it’s worth: The article is is linked over here if you’d like to read (I’ve skimmed through and it seems to be focusing on changes to the tax law and the effects they will have on various groups of people). But here’s something of note: With the piece, there is a link specifically to an interactive infographic that describes how the tax law changes would affect people in most income ranges. It goes as low as “single unemployed person” making less than $10,000 per year. Here’s what it looks like:

It’s not a situation where they don’t think low-income people exist. It’s just that they were showing one set of examples in the top one, and left the more granular examples for the interactive graphic. That doesn’t explain why the interactive graphic got flat orange stick figures and the one above got frowny-faced upper-middle-class people, but the WSJ has people making under $180k covered — at least online.

robot-heart-politics:

thepeoplesrecord:

In 1983 there were 50 different corporations that had control over our media, today there are only six: Viacom, Comcast, Disney, TimeWarner, CBS, and News Corporation. 

Is anyone surprised by this?

For what it’s worth: The article is is linked over here if you’d like to read (I’ve skimmed through and it seems to be focusing on changes to the tax law and the effects they will have on various groups of people). But here’s something of note: With the piece, there is a link specifically to an interactive infographic that describes how the tax law changes would affect people in most income ranges. It goes as low as “single unemployed person” making less than $10,000 per year. Here’s what it looks like:

It’s not a situation where they don’t think low-income people exist. It’s just that they were showing one set of examples in the top one, and left the more granular examples for the interactive graphic. That doesn’t explain why the interactive graphic got flat orange stick figures and the one above got frowny-faced upper-middle-class people, but the WSJ has people making under $180k covered — at least online.

(via )

2:27 // 1 year ago
March 9, 2012
9:05 // 2 years ago
October 20, 2011
If senior management was aware and it wasn’t a rogue operation, that’s a huge problem. There’s nothing they own that compares to the reputation of a news company, especially the Wall Street Journal.
Yale University School of Management senior associate dean Jeffrey Sonnenfeld • Speculating on the danger News Corp. faces over a circulation-inflation scandal involving its most-known upmarket publication, The Wall Street Journal — particularly its European operations. The scandal has already led to the resignation of Andrew Langhoff, the paper’s publisher, but with word that the scandal was known amongst higher-ups at the company but ignored, things could get significantly messier. It’s been a bad year for the company, already: A hacking scandal took down the company’s most-known downmarket publication, News of the World.
1:52 // 2 years ago
October 14, 2011
Of these YouTube-driven CEO apologies the Wall Street Journal has thrown together, who’s the sorriest? Judge for yourself by watching them one by one. On the list? BP, Groupon, Sony and Netflix. Four of our favorite companies!

Of these YouTube-driven CEO apologies the Wall Street Journal has thrown together, who’s the sorriest? Judge for yourself by watching them one by one. On the list? BP, Groupon, Sony and Netflix. Four of our favorite companies!

16:20 // 2 years ago
October 13, 2011
Frontrunner? Herman Cain leapfrogs Romney in new 2012 poll: And it’s a big leap, too: Cain is at a solid 27 percent in the NBC News/WSJ poll, with Romney at 23 percent and Perry way behind with 16 percent. This despite the fact that Romney won handily on Tuesday. source Follow ShortFormBlog

Frontrunner? Herman Cain leapfrogs Romney in new 2012 poll: And it’s a big leap, too: Cain is at a solid 27 percent in the NBC News/WSJ poll, with Romney at 23 percent and Perry way behind with 16 percent. This despite the fact that Romney won handily on Tuesday. source

Follow ShortFormBlog

10:23 // 2 years ago
October 1, 2011
Here’s one that didn’t get into our last post (a breakdown of Occupy Wall Street story play). The WSJ gave it big play (albeit text-only), but we’re distracted by a youthful Rick Perry looking like a total tool. (thanks Josh Sternberg)

Here’s one that didn’t get into our last post (a breakdown of Occupy Wall Street story play). The WSJ gave it big play (albeit text-only), but we’re distracted by a youthful Rick Perry looking like a total tool. (thanks Josh Sternberg)

22:20 // 2 years ago
August 5, 2011
Perhaps this wasn’t intentional, but this e-mail we got from the WSJ about their MarketWatch Market Data iPad app seemed super-crass to receive less than an hour after the S&P downgraded the U.S. credit rating. Just sayin’.

Perhaps this wasn’t intentional, but this e-mail we got from the WSJ about their MarketWatch Market Data iPad app seemed super-crass to receive less than an hour after the S&P downgraded the U.S. credit rating. Just sayin’.

23:28 // 2 years ago