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August 1, 2013
F-I-N-A-L-L-Y: Today, with the birth of a youngster in the station, DC’s L’Enfant Plaza now lives up to its name. The baby should be named “Annoyed Passenger” in honor of the people on the train who would rather chase Paul Ryan down, drunk and shoeless than cheer on the miracle of life.

F-I-N-A-L-L-Y: Today, with the birth of a youngster in the station, DC’s L’Enfant Plaza now lives up to its name. The baby should be named “Annoyed Passenger” in honor of the people on the train who would rather chase Paul Ryan down, drunk and shoeless than cheer on the miracle of life.

11:37 // 8 months ago
July 7, 2013
Well, that was a waste of time: Over the span of nine months, a “phantom planter” in Washington D.C.’s Dupont Circle neighborhood has been planting flowers throughout the iconic metro station entrance on the north side of the circle. Days after the mysterious planter came forward—local garden artist Henry Docter—the WMATA system showed exactly how much it cared about the feat. Rather than letting the flowers bloom—creating a red, white, and blue flourish at the station—the metro system removed the flowers entirely last weekend, days after citing safety concerns. (The rogue planter said he would use his own equipment and wouldn’t sue if he got hurt.) “It never occurred to me that Metro would think it was more efficient to rip out the plants than to let someone water them,” Docter told The Washington Post.

Well, that was a waste of time: Over the span of nine months, a “phantom planter” in Washington D.C.’s Dupont Circle neighborhood has been planting flowers throughout the iconic metro station entrance on the north side of the circle. Days after the mysterious planter came forward—local garden artist Henry Docter—the WMATA system showed exactly how much it cared about the feat. Rather than letting the flowers bloom—creating a red, white, and blue flourish at the station—the metro system removed the flowers entirely last weekend, days after citing safety concerns. (The rogue planter said he would use his own equipment and wouldn’t sue if he got hurt.) “It never occurred to me that Metro would think it was more efficient to rip out the plants than to let someone water them,” Docter told The Washington Post.

14:54 // 9 months ago
May 6, 2013
Fifteen seconds before this train reached the station, this guy jumped on the tracks. Someone managed to snap a photo of the incident … but here’s the crazy part. The train stopped. The guy wasn’t hurt. Though it could have been quite the scary moment. I used to get off at this stop every single day for work. (via BuzzFeed)

Fifteen seconds before this train reached the station, this guy jumped on the tracks. Someone managed to snap a photo of the incident … but here’s the crazy part. The train stopped. The guy wasn’t hurt. Though it could have been quite the scary moment. I used to get off at this stop every single day for work. (via BuzzFeed)

18:05 // 11 months ago
October 28, 2012
20:11 // 1 year ago
July 6, 2012
17:52 // 1 year ago
May 24, 2012

kylewpppd:

transitmaps:

How the WMATA Rush+ Maps Are Printed

Many thanks to Matt Johnson for telling me about this amazing photoset on Flickr that details the process involved in printing the new Rush+ station maps for Washington, DC’s Metro system. Click through to see the whole set!

Even as an experienced graphic designer, I was amazed to see that the maps are screen printed - each colour on the map is printed one after the other, each using a separate screen with its own spot colour ink. With a map as complex as this, that means that there are a whopping twelve different colours to print! These being: river blue, park green, National Mall green, Blue Line, Orange Line, Yellow Line, Green Line, Red Line, Silver Line, District/County border grey, Beltway grey, and finally, black.

I would have thought with the advances in digital printing and stochastic (micro) screening, that these could be produced digitally in one step instead of twelve, but maybe these are special long-lasting UV inks that will withstand many years of use without fading - an important consideration for station maps! In any case, these photos are a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at a process that many people may not even think about.

EDIT: A tweet from a Metro representative confirms that there are THIRTEEN colours used in the printing: 4 greys (Silver Line, Beltway grey, county border grey, and icon grey), 3 greens (parks, Mall, Green Line), 2 Blues (river, Blue Line), Black, Red, Yellow and Orange.

OH MY GOD! I <3 <3 <3 this more than that time I met Bieber.

Dear fans of DC Metro maps: Here’s how they make them. Wow. Awesome.

(via sunfoundation)

16:56 // 1 year ago
April 19, 2012
I’m happy they got the guy and I got my iPad. I broke my arm, yeah. But it worked out.
DC Metro rider Daniel L. Wenger • Discussing how he chased down a dude who tried to steal his iPad. Wenger, a 50-year-old analyst at the Pentagon, was reading the news when a dude came up from behind him and swiped it. It was quite the adventure from there, involving multiple metro trains, much running, and the suspect crossing over the electrified third rail at one station before he was eventually caught at another station. But Wenger got his iPad. Not bad, brah.
10:47 // 2 years ago
October 11, 2011
Scary situation on the DC Metro today: Commuters riding the DC Metro during rush hour had a lot of trouble getting home today after an incident involving a person who got hit by a train on the Orange Line in nearby Arlington. The person is reportedly still alive. Our friend Josh Sundquist was at the scene and snapped this photo of the incident. He&#8217;s been posting updates on Twitter.

Scary situation on the DC Metro today: Commuters riding the DC Metro during rush hour had a lot of trouble getting home today after an incident involving a person who got hit by a train on the Orange Line in nearby Arlington. The person is reportedly still alive. Our friend Josh Sundquist was at the scene and snapped this photo of the incident. He’s been posting updates on Twitter.

18:23 // 2 years ago
August 26, 2011
So, it appears DC&#8217;s metro system is staying open durring the hurricane. Well, underground, that is. But wait, don&#8217;t those underground stations have GIANT FREAKING ENTRANCES that would be perfect for floodwater to fill up?

So, it appears DC’s metro system is staying open durring the hurricane. Well, underground, that is. But wait, don’t those underground stations have GIANT FREAKING ENTRANCES that would be perfect for floodwater to fill up?

14:09 // 2 years ago
June 5, 2011
The guy who designed DC&#8217;s Metro map preps for a redesign
A classic design gets a refresh: Nearly 40 years ago, graphic designer Lance Wyman designed a map that&#8217;s come to define a city. The result — a map of a fairly self-contained Metro system — has survived numerous station changes and many iterations to remain a truly useful piece of work. With upcoming changes to the Metro system that will make the map significantly more complicated, Wyman&#8217;s getting another chance to work on the design, which needs room for Dulles Airport, a new color and a ton of names that have gotten unwieldy over the years (see &#8220;U Street/African-American Civil War Memorial/Cardozo&#8221;). And people are clamoring for a redesign — seriously, check out this contest right here. If you&#8217;re wondering if the 73-year-old Wyman is getting nervous about all this, the answer is yes. This is his &#8216;68 Comeback Special here. (photo by The Washington Post&#8217;s Jennifer S. Altman; see a gallery here) source
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A classic design gets a refresh: Nearly 40 years ago, graphic designer Lance Wyman designed a map that’s come to define a city. The result — a map of a fairly self-contained Metro system — has survived numerous station changes and many iterations to remain a truly useful piece of work. With upcoming changes to the Metro system that will make the map significantly more complicated, Wyman’s getting another chance to work on the design, which needs room for Dulles Airport, a new color and a ton of names that have gotten unwieldy over the years (see “U Street/African-American Civil War Memorial/Cardozo”). And people are clamoring for a redesign — seriously, check out this contest right here. If you’re wondering if the 73-year-old Wyman is getting nervous about all this, the answer is yes. This is his ‘68 Comeback Special here. (photo by The Washington Post’s Jennifer S. Altman; see a gallery here) source

Follow ShortFormBlog

0:59 // 2 years ago