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March 11, 2012

pantslessprogressive:

On Saturday, as tens of thousands of Wisconsinites marched in remembrance of the uprising against Walker’s agenda, there was much talk about the upcoming recall election — and that was important.

But it was equally important that the issue focus remained on renewing the state’s collective bargaining law. There was a recognition that the Wisconsin fight has never been, and can never be, about partisan politics alone. Not when basic rights are at stake.

Collective bargaining is a part of Wisconsin history, an example of this state’s ‘forward’ progressive values.

‘I was around in 1959 when Wisconsin became the first state in the United States, the first state in the Union, to adopt a law to permit public employees to collectively bargain,’ explains the senior member of the state Legislature, Senator Fred Risser, D-Madison. ’Back then, Wisconsin was known as a progressive, innovative state.’

Risser’s serious about renewing Wisconsin’s reputation as a progressive, innovative state, And he has joined with a much younger legislator, state Representative Mark Pocan, D-Madison, to propose legislation that would fully restore collective bargaining rights in Wisconsin.“ - John Nichols

Tens of Thousands Rally in Wisconsin for Labor Rights and Democracy

[Photos: Gary Porter/ Journal Sentinel]

Good to see this issue is still as vital on Wisconsinites’ minds as it was a year ago.

21:54 // 2 years ago
February 20, 2012
If the unions win the recall, there will be no stopping union power.
Billionaire David Koch • Speaking about the Wisconsin recall efforts against Gov. Scott Walker. Koch made the comments during a recent speech after a benefit dinner, and were quickly backtracked by his spokeswoman, who clarified, “[Koch Industries thinks] the best workplace relationships are fostered when the employer works directly with its employees. It is a mischaracterization of our principles to say this means we oppose unions or want to dismantle all unions.” The Koch brothers find themselves under ever-increasing scrutiny for supporting political causes around the country, most notably the recall campaign of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker. source (viafollow)
14:34 // 2 years ago
January 24, 2012

think-progress:

A supporter of Gov. Scott Walker shares this gem of a ballad:

We will sta-a-a-a-a-nd with Gov-er-nor Wal-ker.

Because he does what he says; not just a big fancy talker. 

We will sta-a-a-a-a-nd with Gov-er-nor Wal-ker. 

We got to keep moving ahead, all the way, with Governor Walker.

Oh no we can’t go back again. 

We got to keep moving ahead with Go-o-o-vernor Walker.

Mr. Scott Walker, our Wisconsin Governor.

Had to stop watching out of fear that the chorus would permeate our skull.

9:20 // 2 years ago
January 17, 2012

Wisconsin: Scott Walker could face a recall very freaking soon, guys

  • 540,208 signatures gathered source

» That’s way more than enough, but … In a huge sign of support for the unions that suffered greatly at the hands of Scott Walker, over half a million signatures were gathered against the Wisconsin governor. The signatures, which will get submitted to the state’s Government Accountability Board today, could be enough to force a recall election against the governor just over a year into his term. However, it’s important to keep in mind that gubernatorial recall elections are rare, and have only succeeded twice in U.S. history. The most recent, though, was the 2003 recall of Gray Davis in California, so it’s certainly not unprecedented in the modern political climate for a governor to lose a recall election. But will there be an opponent formidable enough to defeat Scott? Maybe Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, who lost against Walker in 2010 but knows a thing or two about coming back strong after getting his butt kicked.

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11:21 // 2 years ago
January 15, 2012
9:25 // 2 years ago
December 6, 2011
manicchill:

Governor Scott Walker’s New Anti-Protest Strategy: First Amendment Fees
Governor Scott Walker(R-WI) is quickly learning that, when you take away people’s rights, they get angry. And when they get angry, sometimes they show up by the thousands and protest outside your office. For several months.
Well apparently Governor Walker has had enough, because a new set of protest regulations went into effect on December 1st in his state. And they’re not exactly protest-friendly…
The Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel reports:

 Groups of four or more people must obtain permits for all activity and displays in state buildings and apply for those permits at least 72 hours in advance. The policy requires permits for 100 or more people outside the Capitol. The policy does provide some leeway for spontaneous gatherings triggered by unforeseen events.
 Groups holding demonstrations could be charged for the costs of having extra police on hand for the event. Costs associated with a counterprotest could be charged to that second group. The costs would be $50 per hour per Capitol Police officer - costs for police officers from outside agencies would depend on the costs billed to the state. The police could require an advance payment as a requirement for getting a permit and also could require liability insurance or a bond. 

The new rules, which many legal experts warned raise serious first amendment concerns, could also hold demonstrators liable for any/all damages and clean-up required as a result of the protest. The clean-up and repairs statute, Walker claims, is a result of protesters allegedly causing $7.5 million in damage to Wisconsin’s Capitol building.
Surprisingly, the Wisconsin chapter of the ACLU is not challenging, but remains skeptical, of the new laws. The potential damage to free speech protection is not lost on them either. 
As for the Administration, they claim to have reached out to the one of the groups of protesters who do still have a weekly presence, in an effort to make sure everybody’s on the same page.

One group that meets every weekday at the Capitol is the Solidarity Singers, a pro-labor chorus that has been singing in protest of Walker’s policies since last spring.
Department of Administration spokeswoman Jocelyn Webster said an agency lawyer had reached out to the leader of the Solidarity Singers, Chris Reeder, and would be meeting with him about the policy.
Reeder said his group has been willing to take its singing outside on days when other events such as blood drives are happening.
We believe what we’re doing is protected by the First Amendment,” Reeder said of the new policy.

While there doesn’t appear to be any major push-back at this time, it’s unclear if Wisconsinites approve of the new rules, or are too busy collecting signatures for the various Recall Walker campaigns to bother fighting back. If they’re successful, he’ll be gone in a few months anyways.

If you can’t beat ‘em, charge ‘em.

manicchill:

Governor Scott Walker’s New Anti-Protest Strategy: First Amendment Fees

Governor Scott Walker(R-WI) is quickly learning that, when you take away people’s rights, they get angry. And when they get angry, sometimes they show up by the thousands and protest outside your office. For several months.

Well apparently Governor Walker has had enough, because a new set of protest regulations went into effect on December 1st in his state. And they’re not exactly protest-friendly…

The Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel reports:

 Groups of four or more people must obtain permits for all activity and displays in state buildings and apply for those permits at least 72 hours in advance. The policy requires permits for 100 or more people outside the Capitol. The policy does provide some leeway for spontaneous gatherings triggered by unforeseen events.

 Groups holding demonstrations could be charged for the costs of having extra police on hand for the event. Costs associated with a counterprotest could be charged to that second group. The costs would be $50 per hour per Capitol Police officer - costs for police officers from outside agencies would depend on the costs billed to the state. The police could require an advance payment as a requirement for getting a permit and also could require liability insurance or a bond. 

The new rules, which many legal experts warned raise serious first amendment concerns, could also hold demonstrators liable for any/all damages and clean-up required as a result of the protest. The clean-up and repairs statute, Walker claims, is a result of protesters allegedly causing $7.5 million in damage to Wisconsin’s Capitol building.

Surprisingly, the Wisconsin chapter of the ACLU is not challenging, but remains skeptical, of the new laws. The potential damage to free speech protection is not lost on them either. 

As for the Administration, they claim to have reached out to the one of the groups of protesters who do still have a weekly presence, in an effort to make sure everybody’s on the same page.

One group that meets every weekday at the Capitol is the Solidarity Singers, a pro-labor chorus that has been singing in protest of Walker’s policies since last spring.

Department of Administration spokeswoman Jocelyn Webster said an agency lawyer had reached out to the leader of the Solidarity Singers, Chris Reeder, and would be meeting with him about the policy.

Reeder said his group has been willing to take its singing outside on days when other events such as blood drives are happening.

We believe what we’re doing is protected by the First Amendment,” Reeder said of the new policy.

While there doesn’t appear to be any major push-back at this time, it’s unclear if Wisconsinites approve of the new rules, or are too busy collecting signatures for the various Recall Walker campaigns to bother fighting back. If they’re successful, he’ll be gone in a few months anyways.

If you can’t beat ‘em, charge ‘em.

(via manicchill)

10:38 // 2 years ago
November 16, 2011

WI Gov. Scott Walker says he didn’t cause recall effort

Walker to state: Who, me? As the recall push against Wisconsin’s Governor Scott Walker heats up, Walker has pushed back, denying he incited such action: “…we wouldn’t have to spend a penny of that if there weren’t recalls. This is not something we brought on.” To refresh the memory, Walker and the state GOP passed a law stripping union rights from public sector employees earlier this year. Despite the unions agreeing to accept Walker’s benefit cuts if he’d leave collective bargaining alone, Walker wanted the whole hog (he also admitted to a David Koch impersonator that he’d considered planting troublemakers at the Madison protests). source

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14:18 // 2 years ago
October 28, 2011

More on Herman Cain, Mark Block and his checkered past

jeffmiller says: To be fair, the election board counsel felt he was railroaded. From Time: “George Dunst, the Board’s former general counsel, recalls that the evidence was shaky. ‘[Block] got screwed,’ he says. ‘They really did a number on him.’”

» SFB days: Fair enough. The AP story didn’t bring up that particular detail. But it’s also worth noting that the sentence directly before the one you pulled said this: "Former board member David Halbrooks remembers it as a slam dunk case." We changed the story slightly to reflect the non-open-and-shutness of the case. But we do recommend you read the whole story, which also notes that within the past few years, he’s been nailed for sketchy robo-calls in Wisconsin. — Ernie @ SFB

11:29 // 2 years ago
September 30, 2011

Scott Walker’s chief of staff resigns at a somewhat suspect time

  • what Scott Walker’s chief of staff, Keith Gilkes, just decided to resign from his post. The timing is suspect due to an investigation over Walker staffers possibly doing political activities on the taxpayer’s dime.
  • why Gilkes, who says he’s not involved in the “John Doe” investigation, claims that he’s returning to his being a political consultant, but will come in from the bullpen if Walker gets recalled next year. source
15:26 // 3 years ago
September 6, 2011

She would be the first openly-gay senator. OK, so the progressives didn’t get Russ Feingold like they wanted, but Rep. Tammy Baldwin is certainly no spring chicken. “Some people think America’s best days are behind us,” Baldwin says in her announcement clip, “but I’m not one of them.” Do you guys think she has a serious shot at Herb Kohl’s soon-to-be-vacant seat? source

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11:13 // 3 years ago