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January 26, 2012
Our dinner breaks would be 2 1/2 hours long while they drove in new cars and boats and gazebos and stuff. So at NBC in Burbank we had a place called Los Arcos across the street, and they served great margaritas. So Vanna [White] and I would go across and have two or three and six and then come and do and the last shows and have trouble recognizing the alphabet.
Pat Sajak • Revealing that he’s hosted episodes of “Wheel of Fortune” drunk before. Let’s face it … when the job is that easy, you probably would do it drunk, too. Also, this YouTube video exists.
11:08 // 2 years ago
November 12, 2010

It’s not often we have Pat Sajak on the blog twice in a week – he’s a nice guy and all, but we’re not regular watchers of “Wheel of Fortune” by a long shot. But this clip right here is interesting for a number of reasons. First, it’s one of Keith Olbermann’s first network television appearances, and he’s on Pat Sajak’s, lost, lamented talk show with his ‘stache talking about sports. Second, Sajak (a conservative) pulled the clip out of the vault, apologizing for being the first to give Keith a wide audience. Keith, however, denies this, claiming that he had been on CNN years earlier, and had been the subject of segments on The Today Show and the CBS Evening News before that. Finally, no matter what happened, this clip is great. Keith was really funny back in the day, even though he was more wacky newscaster than second coming of Edward R. Murrow. (Pat Sajak’s show did give Rush Limbaugh his first wide audience on television.) source

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22:17 // 3 years ago
November 10, 2010

"There are a million things I’m not good at. But Wheel of Fortune, I can do." Over the weekend, Caitlin Burke drew the attention of game show fans (and random YouTube users) by solving a lengthy puzzle with just a single letter. It left Pat Sajak speechless, and everyone else pretty much in disbelief. Apparently, she read the Esquire article about the guy who got the perfect Showcase Showdown score on “The Price is Right” and used that as her inspiration. Burke, who conveniently works for Esquire’s parent Hearst, explained that she would treat every word like a tiny puzzle within the puzzle, smallest words first. It worked wonders for her – she crushed the competition with $53,000 worth of cash and prizes. And left Pat Sajak without words. source

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20:54 // 3 years ago