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January 11, 2014
16:21 // 7 months ago
May 31, 2013
20:30 // 1 year ago
February 8, 2013
Gawker’s Max Read on why you shouldn’t call this storm battering the East Coast Nemo:

Yes: last year The Weather Channel—which owns Weather.com, Weather Underground, and a host of other weather-related sites—announced it would begin naming winter storms too. That is its official list of names, as packaged in its official, attractive graphic.
The truth is there is very little attempt being made to hide the fact that this is a money play. In case the inclusion of “Draco” and “Nemo” (just some Greek and Roman names, nothing to do with any recent children’s movies, don’t worry) and “Gandolf” (the “Bert Sampson” of fantasy names) didn’t tip you off, the announcement itself makes it clear that this is about punching up the weather story: “A storm with a name takes on a personality all its own,” writes Tom Niziol. Such “personality,” he claims “adds to awareness.”
Awareness! Of course, awareness. It’s true that if everyone involved in risk and emergency communication—management agencies, local governments, and private news outlets—can agree on a name, it might help emphasize and direct storm news and information.

Cable networks: Where they throw out the official rule book in the name of ratings and hope everyone else plays along.

Gawker’s Max Read on why you shouldn’t call this storm battering the East Coast Nemo:

Yes: last year The Weather Channel—which owns Weather.com, Weather Underground, and a host of other weather-related sites—announced it would begin naming winter storms too. That is its official list of names, as packaged in its official, attractive graphic.

The truth is there is very little attempt being made to hide the fact that this is a money play. In case the inclusion of “Draco” and “Nemo” (just some Greek and Roman names, nothing to do with any recent children’s movies, don’t worry) and “Gandolf” (the “Bert Sampson” of fantasy names) didn’t tip you off, the announcement itself makes it clear that this is about punching up the weather story: “A storm with a name takes on a personality all its own,” writes Tom Niziol. Such “personality,” he claims “adds to awareness.”

Awareness! Of course, awareness. It’s true that if everyone involved in risk and emergency communication—management agencies, local governments, and private news outlets—can agree on a name, it might help emphasize and direct storm news and information.

Cable networks: Where they throw out the official rule book in the name of ratings and hope everyone else plays along.

21:46 // 1 year ago
November 23, 2011
More details on Arizona plane crash: These come from Weather Channel executive producer Jesse Hamilton, who managed to get an official on air that said it was a small plane with six people on board. Rescue will be difficult as it happened over tough terrain. Details still coming out. (ht Matt)

More details on Arizona plane crash: These come from Weather Channel executive producer Jesse Hamilton, who managed to get an official on air that said it was a small plane with six people on board. Rescue will be difficult as it happened over tough terrain. Details still coming out. (ht Matt)

22:59 // 2 years ago
November 6, 2011
wxchannel:

Take a look at the forecast high temperatures for the week ahead…

It’s official. The Weather Channel gets Tumblr.

wxchannel:

Take a look at the forecast high temperatures for the week ahead…

It’s official. The Weather Channel gets Tumblr.

18:54 // 2 years ago
August 26, 2011

Explaining the criticism of The Weather Channel’s hurricane coverage

bethefoodoflove said: people will still very likely die, and there will still be a large amount of damage. making light of that fact is a bit disrespectful to all potential suffering caused by the storm, don’t you think?

» SFB says: It’s not meant as “making light” of a network’s coverage to point out that while something is serious, it’s better to take a more sobering approach. I mean this as no disrespect to people whose lives are in danger (I’m in DC myself, so I’m going to feel some of this), but at the same time, a calmer, non-sensationalized approach could help save lives. The Weather Channel is the last network that should take cues from the CNN of recent times, where every story is “BREAKING NEWS,” in all-caps. — Ernie @ SFB

22:08 // 2 years ago
Irene is a hurricane that poses an extraordinary threat and is one that no one has yet experienced in North Carolina to the mid-Atlantic to the Northeast and New England [emphasis added]. This includes Norfolk, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City, Hartford, and Boston.
A statement on the Weather Channel Web site (via the WaPo’s great media writer, Erik Wemple) • Revealing just a wee bit of hubris might be taking over the network’s Hurricane Irene coverage. Because, um, let’s face it, while it’s probably a big storm, it’s not the most uncommon thing in the world for a Category 2 hurricane to head up the East Coast. Let’s be realistic about what we’re dealing with, guys.
21:40 // 2 years ago