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February 24, 2014
And maybe the worst part for Clapper is, he still doesn’t get why Snowden did it. Clapper sees himself as the man who’s opened up the intelligence community to public scrutiny, who keeps the Constitution on his wall, and who’s endured the endless congressional grillings—all while keeping Americans safe. How could Snowden, a fellow intelligence analyst and contractor, not see that? ‘Maybe if I had I’d understand him better because I have trouble understanding what he did or what he’d do,’ the director said. ‘From my standpoint, the damage he’s done. I could almost accept it or understand it if this were simply about his concerns about so-called domestic surveillance programs. But what he did, what he took, what he has exposed, goes way, way, way beyond the so-called domestic surveillance programs.’
James Clapper, the U.S. Director of National Intelligence who “wakes up and prepares for the worst job in Washington,” explains to The Daily Beast’s Eli Lake why they can’t stop another Snowden. 
10:20 // 1 month ago
February 18, 2014
15:14 // 2 months ago
December 28, 2013
It’s very stringent that boys and girls aren’t going to sleep in the same tent together. So, why would you have two boys that would be doing some of the same things you’re trying to prevent?
Scoutmaster Jim Brass • Discussing his reasoning for taking his Auburn, Wash.-based troop out of the Boy Scouts of America, which is changing its rules to allow for gay scouts starting January 1. His concerns touch upon the sexual (noted above) as well as the religious. “If they announced, ‘We’re all going to start getting drunk,’ we’d still leave,” he explained. “And to say we’re reverent but we’re going to go against something specifically God said, it doesn’t sit well with me.”
12:53 // 3 months ago
December 9, 2013
8:20 // 4 months ago
October 28, 2013

Tea Partiers join Code Pink, CAIR and others in #StopWatchingUs rally

poorrichardsnews:

image

In what is an unusual occurrence given today’s political climate, people with vastly different views about the role of government marched in solidarity on Saturday against a common foe: Domestic spying by our government.

From Newsmax:

Protesters marched on Capitol Hill in Washington on Saturday to protest the U.S. government’s online surveillance programs, whose vast scope was revealed this year by former spy agency contractor Edward Snowden.

People carried signs reading: “Stop Mass Spying,” “Thank you, Edward Snowden” and “Unplug Big Brother” as they gathered at the foot of the Capitol to demonstrate against the online surveillance by the National Security Agency.

…The march attracted protesters from both ends of the political spectrum as liberal privacy advocates walked alongside members of the conservative Tea Party movement in opposition to what they say is unlawful government spying on Americans.

Read the Rest

Although many of these activists were probably unaware of it, they were all marching against the unchecked power of big government. And that’s good to see.

More here and here.

Good stuff. 

14:30 // 5 months ago
August 29, 2013
14:02 // 7 months ago
July 4, 2013
No extradition for you: Bolivia will not extradite Edward Snowden to the US should he enter its territory, the country’s foreign ministry announced yesterday. The Bolivian government, which has said it will consider granting asylum to Snowden, called the request “strange, illegal, unfounded and suggestive,” and was particularly irritated that Washington submitted the request on the same day a cadre of its European allies forcibly grounded President Evo Morales’ plane mid-flight under suspicion it was harboring Snowden. It wasn’t, and while there’s no direct evidence Washington pressured its allies to ground Morales’ flight, South American leaders are putting the blame squarely on the United States. (Photo credit: AP) source

No extradition for you: Bolivia will not extradite Edward Snowden to the US should he enter its territory, the country’s foreign ministry announced yesterday. The Bolivian government, which has said it will consider granting asylum to Snowden, called the request “strange, illegal, unfounded and suggestive,” and was particularly irritated that Washington submitted the request on the same day a cadre of its European allies forcibly grounded President Evo Morales’ plane mid-flight under suspicion it was harboring Snowden. It wasn’t, and while there’s no direct evidence Washington pressured its allies to ground Morales’ flight, South American leaders are putting the blame squarely on the United States. (Photo credit: AP) source

15:24 // 9 months ago
May 24, 2013
14:51 // 11 months ago
Washington state was given a C in the American Society of Civil Engineers’ 2013 infrastructure report card and a C- when it came to the state’s bridges. The group said more than a quarter of Washington’s 7,840 bridges are considered structurally deficient of functionally obsolete
No fatalities in I-5 bridge collapse in NW Wash. - CBS News (via robot-heart-politics)

(via )

2:17 // 11 months ago
From the Seattle Times twitter page, another view of the bridge collapse in  Washington. Check out more of the Times’ coverage over this way. (via @BreakingTweets)

From the Seattle Times twitter page, another view of the bridge collapse in  Washington. Check out more of the Times’ coverage over this way(via @BreakingTweets)

0:25 // 11 months ago