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January 17, 2014
Voting laws are designed to assure a free and fair election; the Voter ID Law does not further this goal.
Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court Judge Bernard L. McGinley • In a decision striking down the state’s controversial voter ID law, which has been in place for two years and is one of the nation’s strictest.
11:05 // 9 months ago
February 12, 2013
When any American, no matter where they live or what their party, are denied [the right to vote] because they can’t afford to wait for five, or six, or seven hours to cast a ballot, we are betraying our ideals. So tonight I’m announcing a non-partisan commission to improve the voting experience in America, and it definitely needs improvement. …we can fix this, and we will. The American people demand it, and so does our democracy.
President Obama, calling for reforms to the voting process.This was foreshadowed in a single line during his victory speech on election night 2012 (“we have to fix that”), and as Obama explained, attorneys from both his campaign and that of his opponent, Mitt Romney, will participate in the effort.
22:12 // 1 year ago
January 16, 2013
It was not my bill…The Legislature passed it. I didn’t have anything to do with passing it.
Florida Governor Rick Scott, insisting to his state’s Legislative Black Caucus that he isn’t responsible for the voter ID laws the state passed in 2011. Of course, Scott signed the bill into law, and his administration spent more than $500,000 defending it in court once it became law, so this is a spurious claim, to put it nicely. In other news, a new poll suggests trouble for Scott when he runs for reelection next year. source
13:58 // 1 year ago
December 27, 2011

Rick Perry sues Virginia GOP over ballot exclusion

  • SUE 'em if they don’t let you on the ballot! source

» That’s Rick Perry’s calculus: A total of five Republicans won’t appear (also including Newt Gingrich, Michele Bachmann, Rick Santorum and Jon Huntsman) on the ballot in Virginia’s presidential primary, having failed to collect the 10,000 signatures required by state law, but Rick Perry is the only one to react with a lawsuit (so far). He’s suing the Virginia Republican Party, and the state board of elections, claiming that the state’s signature requirements — in particular, the provision that bans out-of-state circulators from gathering signatures — are unconstitutionally restrictive. Of course, he’s seeking retroactive change in the law, one that would allow him to appear on Virginia’s March 6th ballot after all. We agree with Talking Points Memo that suing one’s own party, even at a statewide level, isn’t normally the best move for a presidential candidate, but then again, what does he have to lose?

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22:28 // 2 years ago