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December 1, 2013
14:55 // 9 months ago
inothernews:

This view of the Metro North derailment gives you a better idea of the scene: seven cars, with four of them off the tracks and the front car literally inches from the Hudson River.  The train locomotive is in the rear.  Multiple passengers and witnesses say the train took the curve too fast.  (Photo: Edwin Valero / AP via The New York Times)

This is huge. If you didn’t know, it’s on one of the largest and busiest train lines in the United States - that isn’t Amtrak - and includes numerous stops along lines in populous New York City suburbs in New York and Connecticut. And today is a big travel day after the Thanksgiving holiday. This only gets messy from here. 

inothernews:

This view of the Metro North derailment gives you a better idea of the scene: seven cars, with four of them off the tracks and the front car literally inches from the Hudson River.  The train locomotive is in the rear.  Multiple passengers and witnesses say the train took the curve too fast.  (Photo: Edwin Valero / AP via The New York Times)

This is huge. If you didn’t know, it’s on one of the largest and busiest train lines in the United States - that isn’t Amtrak - and includes numerous stops along lines in populous New York City suburbs in New York and Connecticut. And today is a big travel day after the Thanksgiving holiday. This only gets messy from here. 

10:34 // 9 months ago
April 21, 2013
Penn Station can’t move. But Madison Square Garden can. Is it time to move the iconic arena so the outdated, decaying, poorly organized center of the East Cost transportation universe can grow? That’s what Vin Cipolla and Robert Yaro argue in the New York Daily News, stating, “The tracks stop there, so Penn Station can’t move. But the Garden can.” The current MSG is the fourth iteration of the iconic athletic venue, and you’re more likely to board your Amtrak train first at Penn Station if you look at the arrivals board, not the departures board. (photo by Mike Albans/New York Daily News)

Penn Station can’t move. But Madison Square Garden can. Is it time to move the iconic arena so the outdated, decaying, poorly organized center of the East Cost transportation universe can grow? That’s what Vin Cipolla and Robert Yaro argue in the New York Daily News, stating, “The tracks stop there, so Penn Station can’t move. But the Garden can.” The current MSG is the fourth iteration of the iconic athletic venue, and you’re more likely to board your Amtrak train first at Penn Station if you look at the arrivals board, not the departures board. (photo by Mike Albans/New York Daily News)

19:08 // 1 year ago
February 25, 2013

Ever wonder how street signs are made? Fortunately, NYCDOT made a video showing that process in action. (ht Government Executive)

12:32 // 1 year ago
October 31, 2012
gawkercom:

The Subway Is Back (Sorta)
As of tomorrow, mass rail transit is kinda returning to New York City!
The upshot, basically, is:
You can get from the Bronx to Upper Manhattan, and Upper Manhattan to the Bronx.
You can get from Queens to Upper Manhattan, and Upper Manhattan to Queens. 
You can kinda get around Queens and the Bronx
You can get east to west in north and central Brooklyn, and 
from central Brooklyn to parts of South Brooklyn, and vice versa. 
If you want to go between Brooklyn and Manhattan you can take one of three shuttle busses, running from, respectively, Atlantic Center, Jay Street and Hewes St. and all going to 57th and Lexington Ave.
Here is a map:
Read More

The slow crawl back to normalcy continues. Good luck, New Yorkers.

gawkercom:

The Subway Is Back (Sorta)

As of tomorrow, mass rail transit is kinda returning to New York City!

The upshot, basically, is:

  • You can get from the Bronx to Upper Manhattan, and Upper Manhattan to the Bronx.
  • You can get from Queens to Upper Manhattan, and Upper Manhattan to Queens. 
  • You can kinda get around Queens and the Bronx
  • You can get east to west in north and central Brooklyn, and 
  • from central Brooklyn to parts of South Brooklyn, and vice versa. 
  • If you want to go between Brooklyn and Manhattan you can take one of three shuttle busses, running from, respectively, Atlantic Center, Jay Street and Hewes St. and all going to 57th and Lexington Ave.

Here is a map:

Read More

The slow crawl back to normalcy continues. Good luck, New Yorkers.

14:53 // 1 year ago
May 24, 2012

kylewpppd:

transitmaps:

How the WMATA Rush+ Maps Are Printed

Many thanks to Matt Johnson for telling me about this amazing photoset on Flickr that details the process involved in printing the new Rush+ station maps for Washington, DC’s Metro system. Click through to see the whole set!

Even as an experienced graphic designer, I was amazed to see that the maps are screen printed - each colour on the map is printed one after the other, each using a separate screen with its own spot colour ink. With a map as complex as this, that means that there are a whopping twelve different colours to print! These being: river blue, park green, National Mall green, Blue Line, Orange Line, Yellow Line, Green Line, Red Line, Silver Line, District/County border grey, Beltway grey, and finally, black.

I would have thought with the advances in digital printing and stochastic (micro) screening, that these could be produced digitally in one step instead of twelve, but maybe these are special long-lasting UV inks that will withstand many years of use without fading - an important consideration for station maps! In any case, these photos are a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at a process that many people may not even think about.

EDIT: A tweet from a Metro representative confirms that there are THIRTEEN colours used in the printing: 4 greys (Silver Line, Beltway grey, county border grey, and icon grey), 3 greens (parks, Mall, Green Line), 2 Blues (river, Blue Line), Black, Red, Yellow and Orange.

OH MY GOD! I <3 <3 <3 this more than that time I met Bieber.

Dear fans of DC Metro maps: Here’s how they make them. Wow. Awesome.

(via sunfoundation)

16:56 // 2 years ago
February 14, 2012
22:10 // 2 years ago
September 3, 2011
Right away, over 4,000 workers would be furloughed without pay. If it’s delayed for just 10 days, we will lose nearly $1 billion in highway funding that we can never get back. And if we wait even longer, almost 1 million workers could be in danger of losing their jobs over the next year.
President Barack Obama • Speaking in his weekly radio address about the importance of passing the Surface Transportation Bill — a bill that funds the construction of highways, bridges and so on — before the end of the month. If not, he claims it could cost thousands of jobs, if not more. The AFL-CIO and Chamber of Commerce —a.k.a. unions and big businesses — both support the bill. But Republicans, of course, take issue with the way Obama is framing the debate. Sigh. JUST WORK, GOVERNMENT! source (viafollow)
12:49 // 3 years ago
January 25, 2011

High-speed plans for building high-speed rail

  • 85% of Americans to have access to high-speed rail within 25 years source
21:43 // 3 years ago
December 10, 2010

Midwest states screw themselves out of high-speed rail money

  • money The federal government gives a lot of money for high-speed rail projects across the country. The benefit could potentially be major.
  • principle Annoyed by having to take the money, Ohio and Wisconsin want to cancel their rail projects and use the cash for roads. The DOT says no.
  • money Know what happens to that money now? It goes to fund other states’ rail projects instead. Man, those states sure showed Obama! source
19:56 // 3 years ago