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February 13, 2012
No one can imagine quite the pressure he was under in July. The pace of it was incredible, it was very emotional and traumatic. This is very different.
A source speaking about Rupert Murdoch, who shuttered News of the World under difficult ethics-related circumstances last summer, and rumors surrounding NotW’s former sister paper, The Sun. After the arrest of nine current and former staffers in the past two weeks, word is that the paper’s climate has turned toxic, and some are concerned that Murdoch might close this iconic U.K. tabloid, too. Murdoch is heading to the paper later this week to quell those rumors. Would pay anything to be a fly on that wall.

(Source: reuters.com)

21:34 // 2 years ago
January 28, 2012
News Corporation made a commitment last summer that unacceptable news gathering practices by individuals in the past would not be repeated.
News Corp’s Management and Standards Committee • Discussing the arrests made of four current and former employees of The Sun — along with a policeman. The arrests came as a result of the company choosing to police itself in the wake of the phone-hacking scandal that greatly hurt its reputation. News International’s London offices also got raided in the process. No word if any pie-throwing was involved.
19:44 // 2 years ago
October 15, 2011
2:20 // 3 years ago
July 18, 2011
18:36 // 3 years ago
newsweek:

Looks like The Sun has been hacked. The News Corp-owned UK newspaper’s website is currently redirecting to another domain (http://www.new-times.co.uk/sun/) which lands on a big, screaming headline: ”Media moguls body discovered.” At the bottom: “Lulz.” 
The (untrue!) story goes:

Rupert Murdoch, the controversial media mogul, has reportedly been found dead in his garden, police announce.
Murdoch, aged 80, has said to have ingested a large quantity of palladium before stumbling into his famous topiary garden late last night, passing out in the early hours of the morning.
“We found the chemicals sitting beside a kitchen table, recently cooked,” one officer states. “From what we can gather, Murdoch melted and consumed large quantities of it before exiting into his garden.”

No word yet from The Sun, whose twitter account most recently tweeted, “Oh shizzle,” before pointing towards a story about Snoop Dogg. But Lulz Security, the group that’s famously hacked PBS, Sony, and the CIA over the past few months appears to be taking credit. Just 20 minutes ago they tweeted, “The Sun’s homepage now redirects to the Murdoch death story on the recently-owned New Times website. Can you spell success, gentlemen?” And you thought they’d disbanded.

Today in news stories combining into one.

newsweek:

Looks like The Sun has been hacked. The News Corp-owned UK newspaper’s website is currently redirecting to another domain (http://www.new-times.co.uk/sun/) which lands on a big, screaming headline: ”Media moguls body discovered.” At the bottom: “Lulz.” 

The (untrue!) story goes:

Rupert Murdoch, the controversial media mogul, has reportedly been found dead in his garden, police announce.

Murdoch, aged 80, has said to have ingested a large quantity of palladium before stumbling into his famous topiary garden late last night, passing out in the early hours of the morning.

“We found the chemicals sitting beside a kitchen table, recently cooked,” one officer states. “From what we can gather, Murdoch melted and consumed large quantities of it before exiting into his garden.”

No word yet from The Sun, whose twitter account most recently tweeted, “Oh shizzle,” before pointing towards a story about Snoop Dogg. But Lulz Security, the group that’s famously hacked PBS, Sony, and the CIA over the past few months appears to be taking credit. Just 20 minutes ago they tweeted, “The Sun’s homepage now redirects to the Murdoch death story on the recently-owned New Times website. Can you spell success, gentlemen?” And you thought they’d disbanded.

Today in news stories combining into one.

18:12 // 3 years ago
July 12, 2011

Gordon Brown speaks: The former Prime Minister has been in the news recently by way of the voice mail hacking scandals rocking a number of News International papers in Britain, The Sun and the Sunday Times now the major duo (to say nothing of the now-disbanded News Of The World). Of particular note, a possible advancement in this story — Brown claims that the papers hired people to dig up his private information who had known criminal records. Just by looking at Brown’s posture and demeanor, it’s pretty clear the toll these revelations have taken on him. source

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14:16 // 3 years ago
July 11, 2011
What is the cost of hacking into a major politician’s voice mail?
This fire keeps burning: In the wake of the scandal and subsequent closure of News Of The World, British society has been thrust into a debate about journalistic ethics, and for former PM Gordon Brown the matter isn’t just academic; in addition to the scurrilous behavior we mentioned earlier, Brown specifically believes journalists tried to access his voice mails. We confess ignorance on British law, but this seems like the sort of thing that could easily be called a national security risk, which would be bad news for whoever was calling the shots. News International ended News Of The World altogether to try to nip this cell hacking story in the bud. Even if they had the zeal to shut down The Sun and the Sunday Times as well, it’s too late now. This story looks nowhere near finished. (Photo courtesy Remy Steinegger/World Economic Forum). source
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This fire keeps burning: In the wake of the scandal and subsequent closure of News Of The World, British society has been thrust into a debate about journalistic ethics, and for former PM Gordon Brown the matter isn’t just academic; in addition to the scurrilous behavior we mentioned earlier, Brown specifically believes journalists tried to access his voice mails. We confess ignorance on British law, but this seems like the sort of thing that could easily be called a national security risk, which would be bad news for whoever was calling the shots. News International ended News Of The World altogether to try to nip this cell hacking story in the bud. Even if they had the zeal to shut down The Sun and the Sunday Times as well, it’s too late now. This story looks nowhere near finished. (Photo courtesy Remy Steinegger/World Economic Forum). source

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15:36 // 3 years ago