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June 29, 2012
The man who had the most traffic to gain from yesterday’s news.

The man who had the most traffic to gain from yesterday’s news.

14:39 // 2 years ago
June 28, 2012

Surprise! Excuses have arrived for this morning’s incorrect SCOTUS reports

  • cnn In a statement, the network blamed their much-maligned error on earnest reporting of the decision as it was read by Chief Justice Roberts. Admitting their mistake, the statement says that “CNN regrets that it didn’t wait to report out the full and complete opinion regarding the mandate. We made a correction within a few minutes and apologize for the error.”
  • fox news Fox pointed to earnest reporting as the cause of incorrect reporting too, but with a small difference. They don’t think their actions merit an apology, saying, “By contrast, one other cable network was unable to get their Supreme Court reporter to the camera … Another said it was a big setback for the President. Fox reported the facts, as they came in.” source

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14:53 // 2 years ago
politico:

From POLITICO Pro this chart shows the main provisions of the law after the ruling.

For those keeping score at home: 24 upheld, one on hold by Obama himself, one weakened by the Supreme Court.

politico:

From POLITICO Pro this chart shows the main provisions of the law after the ruling.

For those keeping score at home: 24 upheld, one on hold by Obama himself, one weakened by the Supreme Court.

(via newsweek)

12:43 // 2 years ago

Romney’s response to the Supreme Court ruling. Key words: ”Obamacare was bad policy yesterday. It’s bad policy today.” He thinks this is a mandate to get Obama out of office.

12:41 // 2 years ago
Please, immediately, stop taunting on social networks about CNN and others’ SCOTUS ruling mistake and the AP getting it right. That’s not the impression we want to reflect as an organization. Let our reporting take the lead.
Associated Press Central U.S. regional editor David Scott • In a memo to their reporters and editors, asking them to stop taunting other media organizations that got it wrong.
11:57 // 2 years ago
Because the Constitution permits such a tax, it is not our role to forbid it, or to pass upon its wisdom or fairness.
Chief Justice John Roberts, writing the opinion that reflected a 5-4 vote on whether the individual mandate is constitutional as a tax. (via usatoday)

(via usatoday)

11:10 // 2 years ago

futurejournalismproject:

Everyone Slow Down, Redux Edition

This is an update to our post earlier this morning about slowing down, digesting and getting things right before rushing to report.

CNN didn’t and instead ran banner headlines on its site about the Supreme Court striking down the individual mandate.

Fox too but, well, somehow that’s less surprising.

This is tagged “slow news movement.” I like that.

10:59 // 2 years ago
10:48 // 2 years ago
If Roberts does end up being the fifth and deciding vote to uphold Obamacare, Bush’s Supreme Court legacy will be regarded as a failure too. His reputation among conservatives will never recover.
Washington Examiner columnist Conn Carroll • Suggesting, all the way back in March, that John Roberts would be the deciding vote on health care, based on an American Bar Association survey. Called it. (ht Andrew Sullivan)
10:44 // 2 years ago
Our precedent demonstrates that Congress had the power to impose the exaction in Section 5000A under the taxing power, and that Section 5000A need not be read to do more than impose a tax. This is sufficient to sustain it.
The “money quote” from the individual mandate section of the health care decision, according to SCOTUSblog’s Amy Howe.
10:20 // 2 years ago