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June 19, 2012

New report ties U.S., Israel to Flame via Stuxnet code comparison

  • then Earlier this month, a New York Times report claimed that the Stuxnet virus rampaging through the networks of Iranian nuclear facilities was co-created by the United States and Israel, and deployed under direct instruction from President Obama.
  • now Security analysts and Western officials say that portions of the code from Stuxnet also appears in the code for the Flame virus, confirming suspicions that the United States and Israel created the virus in an effort to hamper Iranian nuclear efforts. source

» The reports come less than 24 hours after news broke that six-nation negotiations with Iran, over the country’s nuclear ambitions, broke down yesterday. During the discussions, Iranian negotiator Saeed Jalili continually insisted that the international community lift sanctions and respect his country’s right to enrich uranium. “We had an intense and tough exchange of views,” said EU spokesman Michael Mann, “They responded to our package of proposals from Baghdad but, in doing so, brought up lots of questions.”

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16:44 // 2 years ago
June 2, 2012

Obama personally approved use of Stuxnet computer virus against Iran

  • then Back in June 2010, a super-sophisticated computer virus attack was waged on the Iranian nuclear program. Named “Stuxnet,” the virus disrupted and temporarily shut down about 1,000 of the nation’s 5,000 uranium centrifuges.
  • nowThe decision to push ahead with Stuxnet, which the U.S. and Israel teamed on, came directly from President Obama — he accelerated the attack, part of a U.S. effort to halt Iran’s nuclear program code-named “Olympic Games.” source
13:01 // 2 years ago
June 1, 2012
In case you were wondering, here’s how infamous Iran-infrastructure-damaging bug Stuxnet worked. And to answer your question, the U.S. was involved in what was intended as an act of cyberwar … but the virus (which only got its name after it broke out online) was never intended it to break out onto the larger Internet. But Stuxnet, which broke out in 2010, is old news. A newer virus, Flame, is currently causing major online trauma in the Middle East.

In case you were wondering, here’s how infamous Iran-infrastructure-damaging bug Stuxnet worked. And to answer your question, the U.S. was involved in what was intended as an act of cyberwar … but the virus (which only got its name after it broke out online) was never intended it to break out onto the larger Internet. But Stuxnet, which broke out in 2010, is old news. A newer virus, Flame, is currently causing major online trauma in the Middle East.

12:52 // 2 years ago
January 16, 2011

Wikileaks, Stuxnet collide to create awesome article about Iran

Iran doesn’t have the bomb yet. But they’ve been trying really hard to get it, according to the latest round of data released from Wikileaks. The Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten, which reportedly has all 250,000 diplomatic cables, has been releasing them slowly but surely, and the latest one is kinda sorta a big deal. The cables portray it as kind of last-gasp attempt for Iran to jump-start its diplomatic prowess. ”A race exists between the bomb and financial collapse,” one French nuclear expert explained in the cable. Some quick numbers:

  • 350 Iranian companies and groups were reportedly involved in the pursuit of nuclear technology
  • 30+ countries that have contacts Iran is trying to use to make this bomb thingy happen
  • no Iran doesn’t have much in the way of its own uranium, making their job tougher source

» Oh, and remember Stuxnet? That computer worm seemingly designed to damage Iran’s nuclear program was reportedly a American-Israeli joint, according to this here article by The New York Times. It was reportedly so effective at causing a malware ruckus that it set Iran’s nuclear program back by several years. Favorite line: "The computer program also secretly recorded what normal operations at the nuclear plant looked like, then played those readings back to plant operators, like a pre-recorded security tape in a bank heist, so that it would appear that everything was operating normally while the centrifuges were actually tearing themselves apart." Class.

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12:14 // 3 years ago
November 18, 2010
This code can automatically enter a system, steal the formula for the product you are manufacturing, alter the ingredients being mixed in your product, and indicate to the operator and your anti-virus software that everything is functioning as expected.
The Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity Center head, Sean McGurk • Explaining why the Stuxnet computer virus is unprecedented and scary and stuff. The virus, which appears to be targeting Iran’s nuclear power plants, has infected 44,000 computers worldwide, mostly in Iran, although around 1,600 are in the U.S. Even though it’s targeted against Iran right now, it’s clear what McGurk is implying here: That the virus could be rewritten to attack other systems, at which point it could prove extremely dangerous. source (viafollow)
9:46 // 3 years ago