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December 11, 2013

Stuff you may have missed: December 11, 2013

The Food and Drug Administration wants to prevent humans from gaining resistance to antibiotics. How are they doing it? Simple—they’re pushing for livestock to stop taking them.

Speaking of livestock, you may want to ensure that glass of milk your drinking is pasteurized. A new study says that one in six people who drink raw milk get sick.

Because he dared put his name on a bipartisan budget bill, Paul Ryan is suddenly conservative enemy number one. 

This guy proposed to his girlfriend on Buzzfeed. (PLEASE say yes)

Spotify is Led Zeppelin’s new House of the Holy.

20:33 // 4 months ago
November 22, 2013

Stuff you may have missed: November 22, 2013

In Latvia, a massive building collapse at a supermarket in the country’s capitol, Riga, has killed at least 51. Dozens more remain trapped in the rubble. “There were torrents of water coming down off the roof. We headed into the back of the supermarket, the aisles were covered in produce and concrete and people lying on the floor,” one eyewitness said of the scene.

A sad tale from the world of baseball: On Thursday, Michael Weiner, the head of the Major League Baseball Players Association, died at 51. Weiner suffered from inoperable brain cancer, but notably stayed on the job despite his very visible condition.

In case you’re curious about what 3,700-year-old wine tastes like, go to Israel and get a taste of some stuff that predates Jesus. (EDIT: Take that back; the wine’s evaporated, but the recipe still lives.)

The problem with wind energy is that the giant blades kill golden eagles.

Spotify has a ton of money.

21:12 // 4 months ago
October 27, 2013

Don’t like the way this sounds? Deal with it. This is Lou’s day.

EDIT: We request that you turn this up full blast and share Lou’s work with your neighbors, because that’s how Lou would have wanted it.

(Source: Spotify)

15:16 // 5 months ago
December 28, 2012

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Playlist of the Dead 2012

It is time for Obit of the Day’s annual Playlist of the Dead. So listen to the music, read the posts, and remember some incredible talent we’ve lost over the past twelve months. (The glaring exception is the Beastie Boys’ Adam Yauch, for whom I was unable to write a post, but I did put “An Open Letter to NYC” on the playlist.)

January

Fred Milano – original member of Dion and the Belmonts

Johnny Otis – “The Godfather of Rhythm and Blues”

Etta James – Grammy winning R&B legend

February

Whitney Houston - Grammy Award-winning singer

Kathryn McDonald – member of Duke Ellington’s orchestra

Billy Strange – guitarist and songwriter, part of the “Wrecking Crew”

Louisiana Red – blues guitarist

Davy Jones – lead singer of The Monkees

March

Jimmy Ellis – backup singer for The Trammps

Eric Lowen – Grammy Award-winning co-writer of “We Belong”

Earl Scruggs – Bluegrass legend

April

Barney McKenna – last of the original Dubliners

Andrew Love – saxophonist and member of the “Memphis Horns”

Levon Helm – legend of rock and folk, member of The Band

Pete Fornatele – WNEW rock DJ

May

Charles “Skip” Pitts – bass player on “Theme from Shaft

Donna Summer – disco legend and Grammy Award winner

Robin Gibb – member of the Bee Gees

June

Herb Reed – original member of the Platters

Graeme Bell – “The Father of Australian Jazz”

July

Jon Lord – keyboardist for Deep Purple

August

Scott McKenzie – singer, “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)”

Willa Ward – member of the gospel group, The Famous Ward Singers

September

“Sugar Boy” Crawford – writer, and original singer, “Iko Iko”

October

R.B. Greaves – writer and singer, “Take a Letter Maria”

Bil Dees – co-writer, “Oh, Pretty Woman”

November

Cleve Duncan – member of The Penguins and lead singer, “Earth Angel”

December

Dave Brubeck – pianist and jazz legend

Fontella Bass – singer of 1965 hit “Rescue Me”

You should be able to find the playlist on Spotify under “Playlist of the Dead 2012” or through my account, Josh Eisenberg.

For more Obit of the Day:

Playlist of the Dead for 2011

Archive

Clever idea for a playlist. 

12:06 // 1 year ago
November 16, 2012
As businesses, Pandora and Spotify are divorced from music. To me, it’s a short logical step to observe that they are doing nothing for the business of music — except undermining the simple cottage industry of pressing ideas onto vinyl, and selling them for more than they cost to manufacture.
Alternative rocker Damon Krukowski • Discussing how his 90s-era bands, Galaxie 500 and Damon & Naomi, have struggled to make any money of note from Spotify and Pandora. In fact, in the most recent quarter, “Pandora paid a total of $64.17 for use of the entire Galaxie 500 catalogue,” he explains, which splits to roughly 33 cents per song per member for the entire catalog. Krukowski’s in an interesting spot — one where the band he’s best known for has a cult audience, but perhaps not one large enough to sustain a high number of listens. Which is no fun for the band, because they need 47,680 listens on Spotify — or 312,000 plays on Pandora — to earn the equivalent earnings they’d get from one album sale.
0:55 // 1 year ago
September 9, 2012
17:03 // 1 year ago
April 11, 2012

Tumblr is working with Spotify on a new audio embed feature Spotify calls “Play.” This is what Lala used to do before Apple bought it out and closed the service. But unlike Lala, this is an HTML5 iFrame embed, meaning it will work on iPads, conceivably. Finally, a company is doing this again. Here’s our favorite pop song that gets really creepy if you think about the lyrics too much, The Sugarcubes’ “Birthday.”

(Source: Spotify)

8:04 // 2 years ago
March 22, 2012
We’ve looked really really hard for evidence of cannibalisation, almost unobjectively. Across the business, we’ve been unable to find that evidence.
Universal Music UK’s Director of Digital Paul Smernicki • Discussing the effect that streaming services like Spotify have had on the music industry, during the Guardian’s Changing Media Summit on Wednesday. Not only did Smernicki have positive things to say about Spotify, but he was unusually optimistic about physical sales during 2012. “We’re very definitely starting to see a flattening of that decline,” he said, adding, “It’s not quite tipping up the other way, but it’s certainly not in terminal decline.” source (viafollow)
13:40 // 2 years ago
January 27, 2012
On Spotify and the ethical issues it presents for music listeners
Why can’t you listen to “El Camino” on Spotify? There are a lot of reasons why The Black Keys’ discography ends with “Brothers” on the service, and it’s not because “Tighten Up” is the best song they’ve ever done. Really, the problems here are ethical. As an idea, the concept of subscription-based music has been around for years — remember Columbia House? or how about eMusic? — and in a lot of ways, Spotify and MOG and Rdio are merely the latest generation of that. But The Verge’s Paul Miller touches a solid nerve with a single sentence: “I suppose what I really want is some sort of ‘free range’ sticker slapped on my music consumption, so that I know the artist was ethically treated in this transaction.” Here’s a breakdown of the issues involved here.
benefits Listeners get to try things without worry of wasting money, and as one label executive notes, most people spend an average of $17 per year on music, meaning consumers could spend more with these services in the long run.
problems Big acts who don’t need services like Spotify to gain exposure — notably The Black Keys, Coldplay and Adele — have taken their latest albums off the service, saying labels benefit from the deals more than individual artists. source
» But is that actually the case? Small-scale bands probably have less to lose in terms of cannibalization, but in a change from the iTunes era, it’s the biggest bands on the planet, not the ones with legacies to protect, that are protesting the services. One Universal Records exec, Rob Wells, says that the artists have nothing to worry about: “Every single one of those bands has earned more money from its album being on Spotify than it has from being on any other services within a period of time.” But try explaining that to Patrick Carney, the drummer for the Black Keys: “For a band that makes a living selling music, it’s not at a point where it’s feasible for us.” For what it’s worth, Spotify and its ilk are working hard on discovery these days.
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Why can’t you listen to “El Camino” on Spotify? There are a lot of reasons why The Black Keys’ discography ends with “Brothers” on the service, and it’s not because “Tighten Up” is the best song they’ve ever done. Really, the problems here are ethical. As an idea, the concept of subscription-based music has been around for years — remember Columbia House? or how about eMusic? — and in a lot of ways, Spotify and MOG and Rdio are merely the latest generation of that. But The Verge’s Paul Miller touches a solid nerve with a single sentence: “I suppose what I really want is some sort of ‘free range’ sticker slapped on my music consumption, so that I know the artist was ethically treated in this transaction.” Here’s a breakdown of the issues involved here.

  • benefits Listeners get to try things without worry of wasting money, and as one label executive notes, most people spend an average of $17 per year on music, meaning consumers could spend more with these services in the long run.
  • problems Big acts who don’t need services like Spotify to gain exposure — notably The Black Keys, Coldplay and Adele — have taken their latest albums off the service, saying labels benefit from the deals more than individual artists. source

» But is that actually the case? Small-scale bands probably have less to lose in terms of cannibalization, but in a change from the iTunes era, it’s the biggest bands on the planet, not the ones with legacies to protect, that are protesting the services. One Universal Records exec, Rob Wells, says that the artists have nothing to worry about: “Every single one of those bands has earned more money from its album being on Spotify than it has from being on any other services within a period of time.” But try explaining that to Patrick Carney, the drummer for the Black Keys: “For a band that makes a living selling music, it’s not at a point where it’s feasible for us.” For what it’s worth, Spotify and its ilk are working hard on discovery these days.

Follow ShortFormBlog

16:16 // 2 years ago
October 14, 2011
13:04 // 2 years ago