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November 5, 2013
How to take a picture of yourself* in space** if you’re not an astronaut
Step one: Create Lego replica of yourself.
Step two: Attach said replica to a high-powered balloon which flies 90,000 feet above the surface. Let it fly.
Step three: Take pictures with an HD camera attached to the balloon.
Step four: Find balloon miles from its start point and send the story to the papers.
* — OK, OK, the Lego form of yourself
** — Not really space but close enough for photo-taking purposes

How to take a picture of yourself* in space** if you’re not an astronaut

Step one: Create Lego replica of yourself.

Step two: Attach said replica to a high-powered balloon which flies 90,000 feet above the surface. Let it fly.

Step three: Take pictures with an HD camera attached to the balloon.

Step four: Find balloon miles from its start point and send the story to the papers.

* — OK, OK, the Lego form of yourself

** — Not really space but close enough for photo-taking purposes

12:05 // 11 months ago
April 6, 2013
breakingnews:

Scientists work on fusion rocket for Mars
NBC News: Researchers at the University of Washington say they’ve built all the pieces for a fusion-powered rocket system that could get a crew to Mars in 30 days. 

“If we can pull off a fusion demonstration in a year, with hundreds of thousands of dollars … there might be a better, cheaper, faster path to using fusion in other applications,” John Slough, a research assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics, told NBC News. …
Timetables for the advent of fusion energy applications have repeatedly shifted to the right, reviving the old joke that the dawn of the fusion age will always be 30 years away.

Photo: An artist’s conception shows a spacecraft powered by a fusion-driven rocket. (UW / MSNW)

Saturdays have become a veritable “this week in space” day around here lately, as last week we touched on the development of the solar-sail project “Sunjammer,” and this week brings exciting news on the Martian travel front. Of course, relying on fusion energy, this is still theoretical, and thus doen’t speak to anything assured — but isn’t it fun to daydream about a month-long jaunt to Mars anyhow?

breakingnews:

Scientists work on fusion rocket for Mars

NBC News: Researchers at the University of Washington say they’ve built all the pieces for a fusion-powered rocket system that could get a crew to Mars in 30 days. 

“If we can pull off a fusion demonstration in a year, with hundreds of thousands of dollars … there might be a better, cheaper, faster path to using fusion in other applications,” John Slough, a research assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics, told NBC News. …

Timetables for the advent of fusion energy applications have repeatedly shifted to the right, reviving the old joke that the dawn of the fusion age will always be 30 years away.

Photo: An artist’s conception shows a spacecraft powered by a fusion-driven rocket. (UW / MSNW)

Saturdays have become a veritable “this week in space” day around here lately, as last week we touched on the development of the solar-sail project “Sunjammer,” and this week brings exciting news on the Martian travel front. Of course, relying on fusion energy, this is still theoretical, and thus doen’t speak to anything assured — but isn’t it fun to daydream about a month-long jaunt to Mars anyhow?

15:26 // 1 year ago
January 28, 2013
Number of monkeys that Iran says it has sent into space: One.

Number of monkeys that Iran says it has sent into space: One.

8:56 // 1 year ago