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January 18, 2012
The Wikipedia blackout presents a horrifying picture of a world with no knowledge. So does the Fox News website, which is running normally.
Andy Daglas (via kateoplis)

Quote of the night. 
1:36 // 2 years ago

"Today is gonna be the the day/Wikipedia’s gonna close for you/By now you should’ve known how/Jimmy Wales was gonna screw you fools/I can’t believe that anybody acts the way you do/About research”

'F*@& me', the words are in the tweets/Of the kids who all ignored the news/Not sure you’d heard of it before?/This blackout against SOPA’s rule/Didn’t you see the giant message plastered on the page/For ‘Mountain Dew’?”

"And all the time I have to work is fading/And all the tools I have to search are missing/There are many things that I/Would like to find tonight/But I don’t know how”

"And you say ‘maybe/I’m gonna play a game/or something/’cause after all/I’m a slacker, y’all’”

1:27 // 2 years ago
1:25 // 2 years ago
What you guys will see if you head to the blog today. It’ll only show up once and will go away quickly. Promise.

What you guys will see if you head to the blog today. It’ll only show up once and will go away quickly. Promise.

1:02 // 2 years ago
Google’s homepage today.

Google’s homepage today.

0:34 // 2 years ago
January 17, 2012

nhaler says: Re: WP, Guardian, NPR: That sounds like a tacit stance of opposition, if they haven't already declared outright support for Wikipedia's protest or protest of SOPA/PIPA in general. By posturing themselves as the supporter of a movement which 'fills in' the void Wikipedia leaves at that time, it's quite easy to present yourself as a guardian of 'free information', even though they're economically-driven multinational corporate conglomerates.

» SFB says: That’s basically it. It’s enabling the opposition without showing a side either way. That’s actually a great way of handling it, if you ask us. Remember, most traditional news orgs tend to err on the side of free speech. This and the Chris Hayes piece from the weekend are like lesson plans in objectively handling SOPA. — Ernie @ SFB

nhaler responds: Perhaps I should I have clarified that I think this positioning is fraudulent. Most media corps, with their corporate-backing and near-monopolistic hold on cable broadcast resources, are quite content with strict copyright and free speach policy. Many of them are/share the same parent companies funding these lawsuits and lobbyists who brought SOPA and PIPA here in the first place, remember. (That’s without even getting into the history of media/State subservience.)

» SFB responds: I work for the WaPo company, remember (though the blog is independent). It’s not as bad as you think it is; freedom of speech is respected by newspapers. They built their names on it so they tend to respect it. Not every media org owns a movie studio. And the ones involved in altwiki don’t have such corporate conflicts. Either way, point noted. — Ernie @ SFB

22:08 // 2 years ago
21:57 // 2 years ago

ayyjam says: Anyone who reads SFB already knows about SOPA so you'd be doing us a disservice to blackout. The worthy news services like yourself need to keep us up to date while those websites, such as Wikipedia, that reach an unaware audience take care of getting their attention.

» SFB says: We got a bunch of asks after our post earlier, with roughly 80 percent of them sharing this sentiment. This one in particular kind of got to the point I was thinking about (thanks for the thoughts!), so this seems to us like the way to go, then. We may have an interstitial, but instead of using one of the pre-fab ones, we’d probably build our own. Thanks for the feedback, everyone! — Ernie @ SFB

20:02 // 2 years ago
awesomebrainpowers:

Not to trivialize an incredibly important issue, but I foresee an off-the-charts spike in office productivity tomorrow. Sadly, the websites that track that kind of thing will have gone dark, so no-one will ever know.
tpmmedia:

A lot of major websites are “going dark” on January 18 in protest over the internet bill SOPA, and this timeline shows you how the campaign has ramped up in the last week. Google is even planning a special doodle about SOPA tomorrow. (via TPM)


We’re on the fence about going dark. We’d rather cover the phenomenon and inform people about it than disappear entirely. I asked inothernews about this, and his thought was this: “I think that if it affects us directly in our ability to deliver information to our audiences, then we have no choice but to participate.” However, to us, it seems like it breaks the line between information source and activism; we’d rather tell people about the activists than play that role ourselves. What do you all think? — Ernie @ SFB

awesomebrainpowers:

Not to trivialize an incredibly important issue, but I foresee an off-the-charts spike in office productivity tomorrow. Sadly, the websites that track that kind of thing will have gone dark, so no-one will ever know.

tpmmedia:

A lot of major websites are “going dark” on January 18 in protest over the internet bill SOPA, and this timeline shows you how the campaign has ramped up in the last week. Google is even planning a special doodle about SOPA tomorrow. (via TPM)

We’re on the fence about going dark. We’d rather cover the phenomenon and inform people about it than disappear entirely. I asked inothernews about this, and his thought was this: “I think that if it affects us directly in our ability to deliver information to our audiences, then we have no choice but to participate.” However, to us, it seems like it breaks the line between information source and activism; we’d rather tell people about the activists than play that role ourselves. What do you all think? — Ernie @ SFB

18:35 // 2 years ago
Due to the Republican and Democratic retreats taking place over the next two weeks, markup of the Stop Online Piracy Act is expected to resume in February. I am committed to continuing to work with my colleagues in the House and Senate to send a bipartisan bill to the White House that saves American jobs and protects intellectual property.
Rep. Lamar Smith • Noting that he will continue pushing SOPA hearings next month despite widespread frustration against the bill. “To enact legislation that protects consumers, businesses and jobs from foreign thieves who steal America’s intellectual property,” he writes, “we will continue to bring together industry representatives and Members to find ways to combat online piracy.” So yeah, SOPA not dead, just dormant.
16:09 // 2 years ago