The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

August 8, 2013

Missing: One Scientology leader’s wife. Or maybe she isn’t. Who knows?!

  • missing? After becoming a bit of a headache for the Church of Scientology in recent weeks due to her high-profile departure, actress Leah Remini filed a missing persons report, asking for the whereabouts of Shelly Miscavige, the wife of church leader David Miscavige. Shelly has not been seen in public since around the time Remini’s show, “The King of Queens,” went off the air in 2007.
  • not missing However, just a few hours after the filing hit the press, police dismissed the report, calling it “unfounded.” “Any reports that she is missing are false,” Miscavige’s lawyer said. “Mrs. Miscavige has been working non-stop in the Church, as she always has.” Our guess: She’s been sitting in her room, watching reruns of “The King of Queens” religiously. source
23:38 // 11 months ago
January 17, 2013
nbcnews:

Paul Haggis says leaving Scientology was ‘a treasonous act’
(Photo: Rock Center with Brian Williams)
In an exclusive interview with Rock Center’s Harry Smith, ex-Scientologist and famed Hollywood director Paul Haggis discusses the controversial church of which he was a member for more than 30 years. He calls the religion a ‘cult’. Haggis is part of author Lawrence Wright’s new book, “Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief.” Wright talked to Rock Center about his new book and Scientology’s controversial history. Rock Center’s two-part report airs Thursday, Jan. 17 at 10pm/9CDT on NBC’s Rock Center with Brian Williams.
Watch the interview.

Hey Harry, did you ask him about the Atlantic ad?

nbcnews:

Paul Haggis says leaving Scientology was ‘a treasonous act’

(Photo: Rock Center with Brian Williams)

In an exclusive interview with Rock Center’s Harry Smith, ex-Scientologist and famed Hollywood director Paul Haggis discusses the controversial church of which he was a member for more than 30 years. He calls the religion a ‘cult’. Haggis is part of author Lawrence Wright’s new book, “Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief.” Wright talked to Rock Center about his new book and Scientology’s controversial history. Rock Center’s two-part report airs Thursday, Jan. 17 at 10pm/9CDT on NBC’s Rock Center with Brian Williams.

Watch the interview.

Hey Harry, did you ask him about the Atlantic ad?

(via nbcnews)

20:09 // 1 year ago
January 15, 2013
12:14 // 1 year ago
January 14, 2013
We have temporarily suspended this advertising campaign pending a review of our policies that govern sponsor content and subsequent comment threads.
The Atlantic • In a statement regarding their controversial scientology ad, which we wrote about earlier in clearly positive terms. Perhaps not the best way to make a good impression.
23:56 // 1 year ago

Trip Report: The Atlantic’s Sponsored Post by the Church of Scientology

My eMeter was working overtime today. Hey mofos, when I clicked on this link over here, I felt like jumping on a couch and screaming about my love for The Atlantic! They really just GOT me as a reader by letting the Church of Scientology pay bajillions of dollars to sponsor this article on their site. On this article, I learned that David Miscavige is a playa who is taking scientology to NEW FREAKING HEIGHTS! LIKE EXPLODING LIKE THAT VOLCANO THEY SHOW IN DIANETICS ADS! Tom Cruise, Jason Lee, John Travolta, they all finally have a place to celebrate on the internet! It’s this ad!

But, you know, the best part? It was going down to the comments, where everyone (except the most recent comments, which seemed confused for some reason) seemed so EXCITED that The Atlantic was giving Scientology the love it deserved, as if they had finally seen the light and had written a glowing critical reassessment of Battlefield Earth in a 20,000-word magazine piece where the lede was “We were wrong.” We get it. L. Ron Hubbard was a visionary. All they had to do was pay The Atlantic a boatload of money to admit it. The Thetans now have a place to play. The haters will go away. All I have to do is reload the page and see the moderators work.

(Seriously, though: What the hell, Atlantic Media?)

EDIT: The Atlantic, clearly catching onto the controversy, took the ad down.

SECOND EDIT: In case you want to see the article in full, here’s a screenshot, taken by Gawker. As it’s a large file, we’re hosting on Dropbox.

THIRD EDIT: The magazine has apologized profusely, starting the apology with the phrase “we screwed up.”

20:39 // 1 year ago
July 19, 2012
13:37 // 2 years ago
July 2, 2012

nickdivers says: Does anyone actually think Tom Cruise would send Suri, his very cute and very public daughter, to Sea Org? Wouldn't that be a huge PR disaster for both Cruise and COS?

» SFB says: Whether or not the Church actually would (the reports suggest that, even if they did, that was a concern of Holmes), they’re formally denying it, saying you have to be 16 to go to Sea Org. Don’t doubt you though; it’d be bad optics. — Ernie @ SFB

18:52 // 2 years ago
February 26, 2012
"Suddenly I’m in that world in my backyard afterwards …" You mean your Scientology seances, Tom?

"Suddenly I’m in that world in my backyard afterwards …" You mean your Scientology seances, Tom?

21:02 // 2 years ago
June 23, 2011

Ex-Scientology official releases possible church enemies list

  • departure Marty Rathbun was at one time a high-ranking official within the Church of Scientology. He departed from this position in 2004, which probably didn’t earn him many friends — critics often accuse the Church of cutting off apostates from their families.
  • exposure Rathbun has released a PDF file which he claims originated from Scientology’s creepily-named Office of Special Affairs. If genuine, it reads like an enemies list. Given the Church’s record, expect a blanket denial and some attacks on Rathbun’s character soon. source

Read ShortFormBlogFollow

17:47 // 3 years ago
June 18, 2011
20:31 // 3 years ago