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November 7, 2012
In an alternate reality, this would be Mitt Romney’s first web presence as President-Elect. He prepared a transition site in preparation for victory, and it was live for a brief period of time before it was clear he’d lost the election. Big ups to Taegan Goddard for grabbing screenshots before the site was toast. source  

In an alternate reality, this would be Mitt Romney’s first web presence as President-Elect. He prepared a transition site in preparation for victory, and it was live for a brief period of time before it was clear he’d lost the election. Big ups to Taegan Goddard for grabbing screenshots before the site was toast. source  

21:19 // 1 year ago
November 1, 2012
Michael Bloomberg endorses Obama: Shortly after delivering some extremely harsh criticism of President Obama in The Atlantic this month, the Mayor of New York has endorsed Obama for reelection, attributing much of his decision to Obama’s leadership on, of all things, climate change. “Obama has taken major steps to reduce our carbon consumption, including setting higher fuel-efficiency standards for cars and trucks,” Bloomberg wrote in his endorsement. He had nice words for Mitt Romney, but criticized him for reversing otherwise “sensible positions” on a variety of issues. “If the 1994 or 2003 version of Mitt Romney were running for president, I may well have voted for him,” said Bloomberg. (Photo credit: AP) source

Michael Bloomberg endorses Obama: Shortly after delivering some extremely harsh criticism of President Obama in The Atlantic this month, the Mayor of New York has endorsed Obama for reelection, attributing much of his decision to Obama’s leadership on, of all things, climate change. “Obama has taken major steps to reduce our carbon consumption, including setting higher fuel-efficiency standards for cars and trucks,” Bloomberg wrote in his endorsement. He had nice words for Mitt Romney, but criticized him for reversing otherwise “sensible positions” on a variety of issues. “If the 1994 or 2003 version of Mitt Romney were running for president, I may well have voted for him,” said Bloomberg. (Photo credit: AP) source

19:33 // 1 year ago
October 29, 2012
To be brutal, a certain amount of bad weather on election day helps conservatives in every democracy. In crude terms, car-driving conservative retirees still turn out in driving rain, when bus-taking lower-income workers just back from a night shift are more likely to give rain-soaked polls a miss.
The Economist, speculating on what effect—if any—Hurricane Sandy might have on the outcome of the election. “School closures are a particular problem for low-income families or single mothers scrambling to find childcare,” the columnist adds, and this could further surpress Democratic turnout. However, there’s also the possibility that Sandy could help Obama’s chances. The theory here is that the news coverage devoted to the storm will prevent any serious change in the media narrative of the race from taking hold, and because Obama is still the favorite for reelection, this could end up “freezing the election campaign, and Mr Romney’s perceived momentum, in place.” In truth, it’s anyone’s guess as to what effect Sandy will have on the polls. Thankfully, though, the storm is expected to clear up by November 6th, so it may ultimately be a moot point. —Seth @ ShortFormBlog (via election)
18:56 // 1 year ago
October 18, 2012
14:31 // 1 year ago
October 15, 2012

LEAKED: The list of guidelines for the debate that both camps agreed to

2012 Debates Memorandum of Understanding Between the Obama and Romney Campaigns

The guidelines of tomorrow’s presidential debate, as agreed upon by both campaigns (technically, this is a “memorandum of understanding,” not a list of official rules). Good get by Mark Halperin over at Time, who highlighted some of the more interesting bits in the 21-page document. source

22:53 // 1 year ago
October 12, 2012
The only relevant comparison that I see between your campaign and Friday Night Lights is in the character of Buddy Garrity — who turned his back on American car manufacturers selling imported cars from Japan…Please come up with your own campaign slogan.
Friday Night Lights creator Peter Berg, in an irritated letter to Mitt Romney. Berg is annoyed that the Romney campaign has appropriated a tagline from his TV series—“Clear Eyes, Full Hearts, Can’t Lose”—for use on the campaign trail. “Your use of the expression falsely and inappropriately associates Friday Night Lights with the Romney/Ryan campaign,” Berg writes. “Your politics and campaign are clearly not aligned with the themes we portrayed in the series.” Oddly enough, the author of the book upon which the series is based has endorsed Romney for president. source (pdf)
18:29 // 1 year ago
October 11, 2012
We don’t have people that become ill, who die in their apartment because they don’t have insurance.
Mitt Romney today. Actually, about 26,000 Americans die every year because they don’t have health insurance, so Romney is flatly wrong (and, in our eyes, being a bit disrespectful to about 26,000 American families). He also said that "we don’t have a setting across this country where if you don’t have insurance, we just say to you, ‘Tough luck, you’re going to die when you have your heart attack.’" source
13:53 // 1 year ago
October 5, 2012

Mitt Romney says his 47% remarks were “completely wrong”

  • september When the 47% video leaked last month, Romney said that his comments were “not elegantly stated.” However, he stood by the sentiment behind them:  ”I recognize that those people who are not paying income tax…those that are dependent upon government…I’m not gonna get them.” 
  • october Today, Romney denounced the comments entirely. “I said something that’s just completely wrong,” he told Sean Hannity. “My life has shown that I care about 100 percent. And that has been demonstrated throughout my life. And this whole campaign is about the 100 percent.” source
1:45 // 1 year ago
September 28, 2012

Super PACS pay a whole lot more for ad time than candidates’ campaigns

$125 the price President Obama’s campaign paid for a slot of ad time in Ohio

$900 the price a conservative super PAC paid for the same amount of ad time in the same state source

A rarely-discussed fact about super PACS: Under federal law, they’re charged a substantially higher rate for ad time than candidates’ campaigns. One implication of this is that candidates who are supported primarily by super PACS get a lot less bang for their buck than candidates who pay for ads with their own campaigns. This excellent chart, courtesy of Paul Blumenthal at Huffington Post, says it all:

Keep in mind that Florida is a must-win state for Mitt Romney, yet for all of his supposed financial advantages, he’s buying less ad time there than Obama (h/t Jon Chait).

18:27 // 1 year ago
September 27, 2012
Team Romney probably isn’t too happy about this picture.

Team Romney probably isn’t too happy about this picture.

20:05 // 1 year ago