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August 28, 2013
rollingstone:

Aaron Hernandez might have been one of the NFL’s all-time greats, but he could never escape drugs, guns and a life of violence. Click through for our full interactive feature on murder suspect Aaron Hernandez.

This is a great piece with interesting design and compelling subject matter, but some questionable content teases here:



Certainly it’s fair to tease content in these pieces, but there’s certainly a lot of killing and destroying going on here. In this context, it glorifies the subject matter in a bad way.

rollingstone:

Aaron Hernandez might have been one of the NFL’s all-time greats, but he could never escape drugs, guns and a life of violence. Click through for our full interactive feature on murder suspect Aaron Hernandez.

This is a great piece with interesting design and compelling subject matter, but some questionable content teases here:

Certainly it’s fair to tease content in these pieces, but there’s certainly a lot of killing and destroying going on here. In this context, it glorifies the subject matter in a bad way.

11:11 // 1 year ago
August 1, 2013

Lesson from Rolling Stone saga: Controversy sells

  • 102% the increase in sales at retail Rolling Stone saw of its recent controversial Boston Bomber issue, featuring Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. That’s despite a number of major chains, including CVS, that chose not to carry the issue. source
11:30 // 1 year ago
July 18, 2013
Photography is very simple, it’s very basic. It brings us back to the cave. An image like this on the cover of Rolling Stone, we see it instantly as being wrong. What Rolling Stone did was wrong. This guy is evil. This is the real Boston bomber. Not someone fluffed and buffed for the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.
Massachusetts State police officer Sgt. Sean Murphy • Discussing his reasoning for giving a number of photos of the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev manhunt—including some of Tsarnaev, covered in blood and with a sniper’s laser target on his forehead, surrendering to police—to Boston Magazine, as a sort of retaliation for the Rolling Stone cover. (Good luck loading the page, by the way.) Murphy’s move comes as a surprise, to say the least, and as you might guess, it had blowback—The Atlantic Wire notes that Murphy was relieved of duties, but not fired, due to the publishing of the photos.

(Personal take: I’m really struggling to see how this improves the situation. If the Rolling Stone cover glorified Tsarnaev one way, this does it in a completely different way. It’s a questionable decision and takes away from stories like this one.)
23:40 // 1 year ago
July 17, 2013

Statement from Rolling Stone on issue with Boston Marathon bombing suspect on the cover

nbcnightlynews:

"Our hearts go out to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing, and our thoughts are always with them and their families. The cover story we are publishing this week falls within the traditions of journalism and Rolling Stone’s long-standing commitment to serious and thoughtful coverage of the most important political and cultural issues of our day. The fact that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is young, and in the same age group as many of our readers, makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities of this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens."

Thoughts? (Here’s a take we shared earlier.)

14:15 // 1 year ago
hypervocal:

In defense of Rolling Stone’s cover. Excerpt: 
If you want to be outraged, be outraged. Nobody’s stopping you.
The big crime here, however, is not its offensiveness to victims or our cover boy-as-rock star sensibilities. It’s the lack of inspiration. This photo, taken from one of the Younger Tsarnaev’s social media accounts, has been everywhere. It’s been on the front page of the New York Times. It’s been on every news website in the country. It’s been on Facebook and Tumblr and Twitter, and probably Weibo. You’ve seen it and seen it and seen it.
But now that his smug selfie stares at you from the cover of a rock magazine, regardless of the fact that the story itself seems to be good journalism — real journalism telling a story we WANT to hear, we NEED to hear, the ‘teachable moment’ story of how a normal kid ended up trying to commit mass murder in the name of terrorism — we’re outraged?

Slade makes a good point here. Let’s not let the cover overshadow what appears to be an in-depth story about Tsarnaev. Even if you disagree with the cover itself, there appear to be interesting details uncovered by the reporter.

hypervocal:

In defense of Rolling Stone’s cover. Excerpt: 

If you want to be outraged, be outraged. Nobody’s stopping you.

The big crime here, however, is not its offensiveness to victims or our cover boy-as-rock star sensibilities. It’s the lack of inspiration. This photo, taken from one of the Younger Tsarnaev’s social media accounts, has been everywhere. It’s been on the front page of the New York Times. It’s been on every news website in the country. It’s been on Facebook and Tumblr and Twitter, and probably Weibo. You’ve seen it and seen it and seen it.

But now that his smug selfie stares at you from the cover of a rock magazine, regardless of the fact that the story itself seems to be good journalism — real journalism telling a story we WANT to hear, we NEED to hear, the ‘teachable moment’ story of how a normal kid ended up trying to commit mass murder in the name of terrorism — we’re outraged?

Slade makes a good point here. Let’s not let the cover overshadow what appears to be an in-depth story about Tsarnaev. Even if you disagree with the cover itself, there appear to be interesting details uncovered by the reporter.

10:39 // 1 year ago
June 22, 2013

Michael Hastings raised concerns about FBI investigation before his death; FBI denies

  • claim In the days since the death of Buzzfeed reporter Michael Hastings, claims have surfaced that the reporter was concerned he was being investigated by the FBI, including from his own editor at Buzzfeed, Ben Smith. “Before his death, Michael told a number of his friends and colleagues that he was concerned that he was under investigation,” Smith told New York magazine. The claims gained extra scrutiny after a friend of his produced an email sent from Hastings raising concerns about an investigation, sent less than a day before his death.
  • denial Despite this, the FBI flatly denies such claims. “At no time was Michael Hastings under investigation by the FBI,” spokeswoman Laura Eimiller said in a statement. Despite this, concerns have not died down as Hastings hinted that he was working on a story, related to the NSA scandal, which may have had significant implications. Among the sources Hastings was reportedly planning to talk to for upcoming stories included Anonymous-tied activist Barrett Brown and Jill Kelley, the Tampa socialite who had been mixed up in the David Petraeus case. source
13:02 // 1 year ago
June 18, 2013
Mainly you really have to love writing and reporting. Like it’s more important to you than anything else in your life—family, friends, social life, whatever.
Buzzfeed reporter Michael Hastings • Offering advice to young journalists in a Reddit thread last year. Hastings, 33, died in a car crash on Tuesday morning. Despite his young age, he left a fairly significant mark on the journalism world, scoring a 2010 Rolling Stone interview with Gen. Stanley McChrystal in which the then-Commander of U.S. and NATO Coalition Forces in Afghanistan spoke negatively of White House staff. Hastings’ report sent shockwaves through Washington, leading to McChrystal’s firing before the report was even officially published. While McChrystal was eventually cleared of wrongdoing in the case, Rolling Stone stood behind Hastings’ article. Hastings’ death led many journalists to leave statements of remorse in the wake of the news, including his editor, Ben Smith, who said in a statement that “He wrote stories that would otherwise have gone unwritten, and without him there are great stories that will go untold.” (reddit thread via Twitter user @nbj914)
19:38 // 1 year ago
June 2, 2013
Back in 2007, the cigarette company Camel published an ad wrapped around an illustrated Rolling Stone insert that featured dozens of indie bands—a setup that looked so suspiciously like a giant ad that federal regulators clamped down on Camel (noting that cartoons were banned in cigarette ads) and some of the bands sued. The backlash to this ad was so strong that Camel stopped advertising in magazines for more than five years—a trend that recently changed. (via @cschweitz)

Back in 2007, the cigarette company Camel published an ad wrapped around an illustrated Rolling Stone insert that featured dozens of indie bands—a setup that looked so suspiciously like a giant ad that federal regulators clamped down on Camel (noting that cartoons were banned in cigarette ads) and some of the bands sued. The backlash to this ad was so strong that Camel stopped advertising in magazines for more than five years—a trend that recently changed. (via @cschweitz)

20:48 // 1 year ago
September 14, 2012
11:47 // 1 year ago
May 8, 2012
I’m going to have embarrassing moments, and that won’t be fun. But that’s part of what talking to you is about – is hoping people will understand, and hoping they’ll be fairly kind.
Against Me! lead singer Tom Gabel • Discussing the decision to begin living as a woman, to start taking hormone treatments and eventually transition to the name Laura Jane Grace. For Gabel, who says she dealt with gender dysphoria privately for years, the scariest part was revealing the decision to her wife. “But she’s been super-amazing and understanding,” she says. Gabel’s story will be discussed in-depth in the latest issue of Rolling Stone.
23:40 // 2 years ago