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February 1, 2012
Soul Train’s biggest fan? Questlove looks back on Don Cornelius
"im just kinda writing from the heart": The news of Don Cornelius’ death today has sparked many reflections on the man’s career, and lasting societal impact. Soul Train holds a significant place in the many people’s hearts for presenting a celebration of not just black artists, but identity as well, and Cornelius himself was the core of that. Perhaps the best tribute we’ve read on the subject comes from Questlove, and we urge you to read the full piece. “Soul Train to me is the GREATEST creation and inspiration of my life… i will NEVER EVER forget its powerful impact on education on pride on creativity on culture and on me. i love you don.” (Photo on left by Naoharu; photo on right by Questlove, showing his huge selection of hard drives full of old Soul Train episodes, which he says he brings with him everywhere.) source
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"im just kinda writing from the heart": The news of Don Cornelius’ death today has sparked many reflections on the man’s career, and lasting societal impact. Soul Train holds a significant place in the many people’s hearts for presenting a celebration of not just black artists, but identity as well, and Cornelius himself was the core of that. Perhaps the best tribute we’ve read on the subject comes from Questlove, and we urge you to read the full piece. “Soul Train to me is the GREATEST creation and inspiration of my life… i will NEVER EVER forget its powerful impact on education on pride on creativity on culture and on me. i love you don.” (Photo on left by Naoharu; photo on right by Questlove, showing his huge selection of hard drives full of old Soul Train episodes, which he says he brings with him everywhere.) source

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14:59 // 2 years ago
RIP Don Cornelius: The man who brought the soul 
An icon of ’70s television: Don Cornelius, who conceived and hosted the long-running Soul Train, died in Los Angeles early Wednesday morning of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. He was 75. Cornelius’ groundbreaking program, which first aired in the Chicago area and later nationally, was one of the first TV programs that showcased blacks front-and-center, though Cornelius was careful to note that the show emphasized racial diversity. The music show, which focused heavily on dancing in a pre-MTV era, gave such stars as Marvin Gaye and Barry White TV audiences, and later played an important role in building the popularity of hip-hop. His later life was troubled, however: In 2009, he received three years of probation in a spousal abuse case, and reportedly suffered from health problems. His earlier legacy lives on, however: ”I figured as long as the music stayed hot and important and good, that there would always be a reason for ‘Soul Train,’” he said in an interview. Though the show is off the air after a 35-year national run, the empire still exists.

RIP Don Cornelius: The man who brought the soul 

An icon of ’70s television: Don Cornelius, who conceived and hosted the long-running Soul Train, died in Los Angeles early Wednesday morning of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. He was 75. Cornelius’ groundbreaking program, which first aired in the Chicago area and later nationally, was one of the first TV programs that showcased blacks front-and-center, though Cornelius was careful to note that the show emphasized racial diversity. The music show, which focused heavily on dancing in a pre-MTV era, gave such stars as Marvin Gaye and Barry White TV audiences, and later played an important role in building the popularity of hip-hop. His later life was troubled, however: In 2009, he received three years of probation in a spousal abuse case, and reportedly suffered from health problems. His earlier legacy lives on, however: ”I figured as long as the music stayed hot and important and good, that there would always be a reason for ‘Soul Train,’” he said in an interview. Though the show is off the air after a 35-year national run, the empire still exists.

10:58 // 2 years ago