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May 1, 2014

In his second issue, Mr. Feldstein seized on a character who had appeared only marginally in the magazine — a freckled, gaptoothed, big-eared, glazed-looking young man — and put his image on the cover, identifying him as a write-in candidate for president campaigning under the slogan “What — me worry?”
At first he went by Mel Haney, Melvin Cowznofski and other names. But when the December 1956 issue, No. 30, identified him as Alfred E. Neuman, the name stuck. He became the magazine’s perennial cover boy, appearing in dozens of guises, including as a joker on a playing card, an ice-skating barrel jumper, a totem on a totem pole, a football player, a yogi, a construction worker, King Kong atop the Empire State Building, Rosemary’s baby, Uncle Sam, General Patton and Barbra Streisand.
Neuman became the symbol of Mad, his goofy countenance often intruding, Zelig-like, into scenes from the political landscape and from popular television shows and movies. He signaled the magazine’s editorial attitude, which fell somewhere between juvenile nose-thumbing at contemporary culture and sophisticated spoofing.

Al Feldstein, the Soul of Mad Magazine, Dies at 88

In his second issue, Mr. Feldstein seized on a character who had appeared only marginally in the magazine — a freckled, gaptoothed, big-eared, glazed-looking young man — and put his image on the cover, identifying him as a write-in candidate for president campaigning under the slogan “What — me worry?”

At first he went by Mel Haney, Melvin Cowznofski and other names. But when the December 1956 issue, No. 30, identified him as Alfred E. Neuman, the name stuck. He became the magazine’s perennial cover boy, appearing in dozens of guises, including as a joker on a playing card, an ice-skating barrel jumper, a totem on a totem pole, a football player, a yogi, a construction worker, King Kong atop the Empire State Building, Rosemary’s baby, Uncle Sam, General Patton and Barbra Streisand.

Neuman became the symbol of Mad, his goofy countenance often intruding, Zelig-like, into scenes from the political landscape and from popular television shows and movies. He signaled the magazine’s editorial attitude, which fell somewhere between juvenile nose-thumbing at contemporary culture and sophisticated spoofing.

Al Feldstein, the Soul of Mad Magazine, Dies at 88

19:52 // 4 months ago
January 28, 2014
guardian:

Pete Seeger – a life in pictures
US folk musician Pete Seeger has died aged 94. From an intimate show at an American Youth Council rally in 1940 to receiving the National Medal of the Arts from Bill Clinton, we look back at the singer and activist’s life
Photograph: Brian Shuel/Redferns via Getty Images

They don’t make strummers quite like Pete anymore.

guardian:

Pete Seeger – a life in pictures

US folk musician Pete Seeger has died aged 94. From an intimate show at an American Youth Council rally in 1940 to receiving the National Medal of the Arts from Bill Clinton, we look back at the singer and activist’s life

Photograph: Brian Shuel/Redferns via Getty Images

They don’t make strummers quite like Pete anymore.

7:21 // 7 months ago
June 19, 2013
donrickles:

I hope it doesn’t come off as callous or gross to post this GIF now. Maybe it is but I hope that isn’t how it came across. You know how I made it so fast? Because I always have The Sopranos readily available. When I first watched it (devoured it, would be more accurate) it completely changed the way I thought about television. I came to it later than most but that didn’t make it any less revelatory. It was perfect television and it couldn’t have been that with anyone but James Gandolfini in front of the camera. During my first (and thus far only) trip to New York City I had the chance to see Gandolfini in Gods of Carnage on Broadway. He was amazing. He was equally amazing last year in both Killing Them Softly and Zero Dark Thirty. He was an immense talent and even more depressing than that, he was set to continue being an immense talent for a long time.
RIP James Gandolfini

A great tribute.

donrickles:

I hope it doesn’t come off as callous or gross to post this GIF now. Maybe it is but I hope that isn’t how it came across. You know how I made it so fast? Because I always have The Sopranos readily available. When I first watched it (devoured it, would be more accurate) it completely changed the way I thought about television. I came to it later than most but that didn’t make it any less revelatory. It was perfect television and it couldn’t have been that with anyone but James Gandolfini in front of the camera. During my first (and thus far only) trip to New York City I had the chance to see Gandolfini in Gods of Carnage on Broadway. He was amazing. He was equally amazing last year in both Killing Them Softly and Zero Dark Thirty. He was an immense talent and even more depressing than that, he was set to continue being an immense talent for a long time.

RIP James Gandolfini

A great tribute.

20:16 // 1 year ago
latimes:

R.I.P. James Gandolfini. The “Sopranos” star has died at age 51, HBO has confirmed.
Photo: Gandolfini in Los Angeles in 2012. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Too soon. Too young. Too much left to do.

latimes:

R.I.P. James Gandolfini. The “Sopranos” star has died at age 51, HBO has confirmed.

Photo: Gandolfini in Los Angeles in 2012. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Too soon. Too young. Too much left to do.

20:13 // 1 year ago
December 23, 2012
RIP early gay marriage icon Richard Adams
Decades before gay marriage started to see major popular breakthroughs, there was Richard Adams (left) and his partner, Anthony Sullivan. The duo made history in 1975, when they applied for—and received—a marriage license from a liberal-leaning county clerk in Boulder, Colo. (They were one of six couples on hand that day.) The licenses were invalidated by the state of Colorado, and Adams and Sullivan found themselves in a series of legal battles, as Sullivan, an Australian national, was denied a permanent resident petition. The letter they received from Immigration and Naturalization Service read as such: “You have failed to establish that a bona fide marital relationship can exist between two f———.” A series of appeals later failed for the couple, but after a stay in Europe, they returned to the U.S. and laid low for more than two decades. Adams, who died Monday at 65, lived to see same-sex marriage increasingly accepted legally and culturally. He is survived by Sullivan, his mother, and a number of siblings. (Los Angeles Times file photo)

RIP early gay marriage icon Richard Adams

Decades before gay marriage started to see major popular breakthroughs, there was Richard Adams (left) and his partner, Anthony Sullivan. The duo made history in 1975, when they applied for—and received—a marriage license from a liberal-leaning county clerk in Boulder, Colo. (They were one of six couples on hand that day.) The licenses were invalidated by the state of Colorado, and Adams and Sullivan found themselves in a series of legal battles, as Sullivan, an Australian national, was denied a permanent resident petition. The letter they received from Immigration and Naturalization Service read as such: “You have failed to establish that a bona fide marital relationship can exist between two f———.” A series of appeals later failed for the couple, but after a stay in Europe, they returned to the U.S. and laid low for more than two decades. Adams, who died Monday at 65, lived to see same-sex marriage increasingly accepted legally and culturally. He is survived by Sullivan, his mother, and a number of siblings. (Los Angeles Times file photo)

14:54 // 1 year ago
December 17, 2012

gifthorsedentistry says: Sorry to hear about Daniel Inouye. The man was an inspiration.

» SFB says: They don’t make ‘em like Daniel anymore. :( — Ernie @ SFB

19:00 // 1 year ago
December 3, 2012
thisistheverge:

First iPad-only newspaper ‘The Daily’ shutting down on December 15th

:( A real heartbreaker. As you guys might know, some of SFB’s staff worked for The Daily until a recent round of layoffs. (I also did a piece for the publication a while back.) Peter, who you might know as BrooklynMutt, also worked on it. They also ran one of the best big-media Tumblrs. It was a great publication with solid design and a forward-looking approach — a real trailblazer. Its death is all-around sad. — Ernie @ SFB

thisistheverge:

First iPad-only newspaper ‘The Daily’ shutting down on December 15th

:( A real heartbreaker. As you guys might know, some of SFB’s staff worked for The Daily until a recent round of layoffs. (I also did a piece for the publication a while back.) Peter, who you might know as BrooklynMutt, also worked on it. They also ran one of the best big-media Tumblrs. It was a great publication with solid design and a forward-looking approach — a real trailblazer. Its death is all-around sad. — Ernie @ SFB

9:07 // 1 year ago
October 14, 2012
Extremely sad news, guys.

Extremely sad news, guys.

(via brooklynmutt)

13:20 // 1 year ago
August 20, 2012
totalfilm:

 Tony Scott dies after fatal bridge jump
The director Tony Scott has died after jumping from a bridge in Los Angeles, as confirmed by the LA County Coroner’s office. He was 68 years old.

"Tony always sent personal, handwritten notes & always drew a cartoon caricature of himself, smoking a cigar, with his hat colored in red,” said director and producer Joe Carnahan of Scott. The director, who ran a production company with his brother Ridley Scott, was known for wearing a faded red hat at nearly all times (even at movie premieres), his action films, and his numerous collaborations with Denzel Washington, among other stars.

totalfilm:

Tony Scott dies after fatal bridge jump

The director Tony Scott has died after jumping from a bridge in Los Angeles, as confirmed by the LA County Coroner’s office. He was 68 years old.

"Tony always sent personal, handwritten notes & always drew a cartoon caricature of himself, smoking a cigar, with his hat colored in red,” said director and producer Joe Carnahan of Scott. The director, who ran a production company with his brother Ridley Scott, was known for wearing a faded red hat at nearly all times (even at movie premieres), his action films, and his numerous collaborations with Denzel Washington, among other stars.

7:43 // 2 years ago
July 24, 2012
tmz:

Sherman Hemsley, the actor who made the character George Jefferson famous in “The Jeffersons,” has died, El Paso cops tell TMZ.

You may not remember this, but George was a groundbreaking character for his day. A real icon — and we’ve lost a few this year. RIP, good sir.

tmz:

Sherman Hemsley, the actor who made the character George Jefferson famous in “The Jeffersons,” has died, El Paso cops tell TMZ.

You may not remember this, but George was a groundbreaking character for his day. A real icon — and we’ve lost a few this year. RIP, good sir.

16:41 // 2 years ago