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February 23, 2013
In a memorandum issued on Friday, John P. Holdren, science adviser to President Obama, called for scientific papers that report the results of federally financed research to become freely accessible within a year or so after publication. The findings are typically published in scientific journals, many of which are open only to paying subscribers. The new policy would apply to federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy and the Department of Agriculture, that finance more than $100 million a year of research. The agencies have six months to submit plans for how they would carry out the new policy. The hope is that broad access to scientific results will encourage faster progress on research and will let anyone apply the knowledge for technological advances.

U.S. Speeds Access to Publicly Financed Scientific Research - NYTimes.com (via dendroica)

We admit we’re not exactly entrenched in the world of federally-backed scientific reports, but this certainly seems like a worthy idea, even if it doesn’t spur more research as desired, to give some of these findings more public profile — any dissenters out there? What do you think?

(via dendroica)

13:13 // 1 year ago
February 19, 2013
13:46 // 1 year ago
August 20, 2012
The usage habits of 3 billion smokers: Now in color!
By the numbers: The Economist put together a great infographic, visualizing the information provided by a new study from the University of Buffalo’s Gary Giovino. Printed in The Lancet, Giovino’s new study closely examines tobacco use, among 3 billion people in 16 countries, offers an interesting look at the gender, age, and economic affluency of those who choose to use. source
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By the numbers: The Economist put together a great infographic, visualizing the information provided by a new study from the University of Buffalo’s Gary Giovino. Printed in The Lancet, Giovino’s new study closely examines tobacco use, among 3 billion people in 16 countries, offers an interesting look at the gender, age, and economic affluency of those who choose to use. source

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17:27 // 1 year ago
July 23, 2012
We are all here today because we want to bring about that moment when we stop adding names. When we can come to a gathering like this one and not talk about the fight against AIDS, but instead commemorate the birth of a generation that is free of AIDS.
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton • During a speech at the International AIDS conference on Monday, announcing that the United States would increase AIDS research funding by $80 million. The money will go to a variety of research and clinical projects, including new projects focused on treating pregnant women with HIV and increasing the availability of volunteer circumcision services for men.   source (viafollow)
15:03 // 1 year ago
February 27, 2012
21:53 // 2 years ago
March 8, 2011
Redondo Beach harbor swamped by mysterious fish horde
Those are DEAD FISH: Estimated in the millions, in fact. They’re floating near the surface in a harbor at Redondo Beach in Los Angeles. Authorities are investigating the cause, with one theory being a “red tide” that pushed the fish into the harbor, where the lack of oxygen caused this grisly display. Whatever the explanation, though, could this help but have a negative impact on the surrounding ecosystems? I mean, just look at all those fish, it’s absurd. source
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Those are DEAD FISH: Estimated in the millions, in fact. They’re floating near the surface in a harbor at Redondo Beach in Los Angeles. Authorities are investigating the cause, with one theory being a “red tide” that pushed the fish into the harbor, where the lack of oxygen caused this grisly display. Whatever the explanation, though, could this help but have a negative impact on the surrounding ecosystems? I mean, just look at all those fish, it’s absurd. source

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15:27 // 3 years ago
March 7, 2011

New research may foreshadow leap in heart disease prevention

  • 13 gene regions linked to heart disease by scientific research source

» Cracking the heart disease code: As anybody with a family history, or personal history of heart disease knows, it’s a frightening and pervasive concern. It should come as thrilling news, then, that a group of scientists believe they’ve located thirteen different gene regions that may indicate a vulnerability to heart attack. Though the knowledge is admittedly limited, and is likely years from practical application in a doctor’s office, advancements like these are what give us hope for a brighter, healthier future, with fewer people unexpectedly dropping dead.

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15:02 // 3 years ago
March 5, 2011
You tend to split a lot fewer infinitives when you think the FBI might be reading your mail.
Cataphora Chief Technology Officer Steve Roberts • Explaining the benefit of his company’s software, which can intelligently parse phrases and figure out when someone is changing their tone (presumably because they have something to hide). This is useful in law cases, particularly ones with a ton of documents – you know, the kind that once required armies of lawyers to do the dirty work. They’re just one of the companies who work in this pretty neat field, and their accuracy rate is actually way better than the people the machines are replacing. “Think about how much money had been spent to be slightly better than a coin toss,” said Bill Herr, a former chemical company lawyer who once herded lawyers in rooms to dig through documents en masse. Like cats. source (viafollow)
13:28 // 3 years ago