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May 22, 2012

thedailywhat:

Thoughtful Rant of the Day: The great libertarian Penn Jillette derides President Obama’s medical marijuana policies, his appearance on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, and his drug use — all without taking a breath.

(Not Safe For Work — explicit raving.)

[vvv]

For those of you who like well-spoken rants.

10:57 // 1 year ago
October 21, 2011
This may be the longest comment in Internet history. In this Google Docs-produced reply, Jeff Jarvis tears apart, piece-by-piece, a lengthy review Evgeny Morozov wrote of his latest book, “Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live,” a buzz-building article in which Morozov pretty much tears Jarvis apart. “Had Jarvis Written his book as self-parody — as a cunning attack on the narrow-mindedness of new media academics who trade in pronouncements so pompous, ahistorical, and vacuous that even the nastiest of post-modernists appear lucid and sensible in comparison — it would have been a remarkable accomplishment,” Morozov writes. “But alas, he is serious. This is a book that should have stayed a tweet.” Total word count of Morozov’s review? 6,389 words. Total word count of Jarvis’ lengthy rebuttal (which includes Morozov’s article, by the way)? 11,605 words. As a service to our short-form readers, we’d like to cut this down to three sentences: "Guy writes book on sharing stuff. Other guy shares his opinion of the book, at length. Original guy gets in huff, responds at length."

This may be the longest comment in Internet history. In this Google Docs-produced reply, Jeff Jarvis tears apart, piece-by-piece, a lengthy review Evgeny Morozov wrote of his latest book, “Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live,” a buzz-building article in which Morozov pretty much tears Jarvis apart. “Had Jarvis Written his book as self-parody — as a cunning attack on the narrow-mindedness of new media academics who trade in pronouncements so pompous, ahistorical, and vacuous that even the nastiest of post-modernists appear lucid and sensible in comparison — it would have been a remarkable accomplishment,” Morozov writes. “But alas, he is serious. This is a book that should have stayed a tweet.” Total word count of Morozov’s review? 6,389 words. Total word count of Jarvis’ lengthy rebuttal (which includes Morozov’s article, by the way)? 11,605 words. As a service to our short-form readers, we’d like to cut this down to three sentences: "Guy writes book on sharing stuff. Other guy shares his opinion of the book, at length. Original guy gets in huff, responds at length."

19:03 // 2 years ago
October 2, 2011
I’m not retiring. Writers don’t retire, and I’ll always be a writer.
Andy Rooney • In his final “A few minutes with Andy Rooney” moment on “60 Minutes.” Nice to see he didn’t smooth off the edges even as he was sad about leaving his job.
20:24 // 2 years ago
July 13, 2011

Sorry … but we just have to get this off our chest Re: Zuckerberg and Google+ 

If you’re going to say things about someone, don’t just assume. The headline on this Inquirer story: “Zuckerberg closes off Google+ account so he can’t be tracked.” The story itself, via Social Statistics compiler Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten: ”Mark Zuckerberg and Google management (Matt Cutts, Larry Page, Sergey Brin, Vic Gundotra and Marissa Mayer) all changed their profiles overnight and consequently dropped out of the Google+ top 100 list!” So, because Zuckerberg (and a bunch of other high-profile people from Google, by the way) might possibly not want to take part in some stupid list that nobody other than a couple of attention-obsessed folks like Robert Scoble really truly care about, it’s the same thing as Zuckerberg caring about his privacy. Not buying it. Maybe Zuckerberg thinks a stupid list is a stupid list. He’s allowed to think so. In the end, this is SEO bait, hook, line and sinker. It’s just dumb.

10:44 // 2 years ago
February 14, 2011

Rant: Why the Grammys mean nothing as a pop-culture barometer

Really, our issue is more that the Grammys appear to be off the grid entirely. They seem to reward things that sort of fit their mold of what popular music should be, and while there’s some overlap between popular music and what the Grammys feel is popular music, quite often things which NOBODY has talked about – not even tastemakers or critics – get nominated and then win. While I’m sure Esperanza Spalding is a great musician who deserves to be heard, the fact of the matter is that she lacks tangible buzz to justify the attention. Nobody in the media was like, “Wow, this Herbie Hancock album is amazing!” before it won Album of the Year back in 2008. It had very little press coverage. The problem is that NARAS presents these awards as the definitive music awards of the year, and they’re so far off the pulse sometimes (because it’s picked by people who are of a stuffy old guard of the music industry) that it calls their opinion into question. I don’t think Bieber should have won, but I think this is a bad introduction to Esperanza Spalding. You want a better, more accurate barometer of pop music? Try Pazz and Jop. What do you think?

20:44 // 3 years ago
November 1, 2010

After the party: Reddit and Fark feel used by Stewart & Colbert

  • delight After weeks of heavy suggestion from the Internet, specifically Reddit, Comedy Central goes forward with “The Rally To Restore Sanity.” Everyone’s estatic.
  • dissing One of the co-founders of Reddit asks Stewart at a press conference how the Internet helped influence them to do the rally. His response? “It didn’t hurt.” Ouch.
  • drama Drew Curtis of Fark loudly rips Comedy Central for giving the Internet too little credit for sparking the idea. It’s the angriest we’ve ever seen Drew. source

» The lesson to take here: DO NOT PISS OFF THE INTERNET. EVEN IF YOU’RE JON FREAKING STEWART. THEY WILL TURN ON YOU.

19:08 // 3 years ago
October 15, 2010
13:00 // 3 years ago