The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

March 2, 2013

WHO study finds elevated cancer risk for babies in Fukushima area

  • 4%increased lifetime relative risk of cancer for babies exposed to the highest radiation areas around Fukushima, Japan, after the 2011 tsunami that caused multiple radiation leaks at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant (according to the World Health Organization). The amount of radiation exposure varied throughout Fukushima Prefecture, with some areas as high as 12 - 25 millisieverts, but much else in the 3 - 5 range. source
19:43 // 1 year ago
September 15, 2012
nbcnews:

Halliburton misplaces mystery radioactive device: ‘Do not handle’
(Photo: Texas Department of State Health Services)
Somewhere in West Texas is a 7-inch radioactive cylinder that Halliburton would like to find. Anyone who comes across it is advised to keep their distance.
“It’s not something that produces radiation in an extremely dangerous form,” said Chris Van Deusen, a spokesman for the Texas Department of State Health Services. “But it’s best for people to stay back, 20 or 25 feet.”
Read the complete story.

Not the sort of thing you’d expect to find laying around, to be sure.

nbcnews:

Halliburton misplaces mystery radioactive device: ‘Do not handle’

(Photo: Texas Department of State Health Services)

Somewhere in West Texas is a 7-inch radioactive cylinder that Halliburton would like to find. Anyone who comes across it is advised to keep their distance.

“It’s not something that produces radiation in an extremely dangerous form,” said Chris Van Deusen, a spokesman for the Texas Department of State Health Services. “But it’s best for people to stay back, 20 or 25 feet.”

Read the complete story.

Not the sort of thing you’d expect to find laying around, to be sure.

(via nbcnews)

15:54 // 2 years ago
August 2, 2011
Fukushima radiation: What deadly radiation “hot spots” look like
See the red spots? You know, the ones surrounded by blue and green? Those represent 10 sieverts per hour of radiation. That is extremely high and could lead to death within seconds. And at the Fukushima site, that’s what they’re apparently still dealing with … mind you, five months after the fact. “Radiation leakage at the plant may have been contained or slowed but it has not been sealed off completely,” noted Osaka University professor and nuclear engineering expert Kenji Sumita. ”The utility is likely to continue finding these spots of high radiation.” To put this in perspective, add three zeros to the number 10, to make it 10,000 millisieverts per hour (mSv). Then, take a look at this graphic. Yeah. Scary as hell, right? We’ll say. source
Follow ShortFormBlog

See the red spots? You know, the ones surrounded by blue and green? Those represent 10 sieverts per hour of radiation. That is extremely high and could lead to death within seconds. And at the Fukushima site, that’s what they’re apparently still dealing with … mind you, five months after the fact. “Radiation leakage at the plant may have been contained or slowed but it has not been sealed off completely,” noted Osaka University professor and nuclear engineering expert Kenji Sumita. ”The utility is likely to continue finding these spots of high radiation.” To put this in perspective, add three zeros to the number 10, to make it 10,000 millisieverts per hour (mSv). Then, take a look at this graphic. Yeah. Scary as hell, right? We’ll say. source

Follow ShortFormBlog

10:18 // 3 years ago
June 18, 2011
Report: Hospitals giving out unnecessary double-CT scans: Fun fact about CT scans: They cost lots of money. Also, a chest CT scan has as much radiation as 350 chest X-rays. So why are some hospitals giving them to patients twice? source Follow ShortFormBlog

Report: Hospitals giving out unnecessary double-CT scans: Fun fact about CT scans: They cost lots of money. Also, a chest CT scan has as much radiation as 350 chest X-rays. So why are some hospitals giving them to patients twice? source

Follow ShortFormBlog

11:17 // 3 years ago
May 31, 2011

More on that WHO/cell phones/cancer thing

oldmanyellsatcloud said: This story sounds…familiar. Quick google foo brought up this old transcript. transcripts.cnn.com/TRA… Weird. Any link to the actual WHO study? only found this: who.int/mediace…

» SFB says: This is new. Engadget has a press release if you’re curious. The International Agency for Research on Cancer, a WHO-affiliated group, made the specific report. If anything else, this certainly makes things more interesting.

14:27 // 3 years ago
April 6, 2011
9:54 // 3 years ago
April 2, 2011

Radioactive water continues to leak into ocean from Fukushima

  • NO concrete fails to plug irradiated water leak at Fukushima source

» The flow has continued at a seemingly unchanged rate. This is bad news for pretty obvious reasons- the leak, coming through an eight-inch crack in a pit containing power cables, is sending water irradiated at 1000 millisieverts per hour into the ocean. Having tried pumping in concrete and failed to make any progress, TEPCO’s next plan is to employ a similar strategy using a type of polymer. Polymer spraying has already been happening throughout the plant, in an effort to prevent radioactive isotopes from escaping into the environment.

Read ShortFormBlogFollow

19:51 // 3 years ago
March 27, 2011

swagandpassion says: I plan on going on a study abroad program to China [Beijing] this May...will radiation be an issue?

» We say: Honestly, it shouldn’t be. Really, it’s only an issue within a 20 km radius, and only trace amounts of radiation have been found outside of Japan.

22:57 // 3 years ago

TEPCO corrections: Not “10 million times” normal level, “100,000 times”

  • errors As you might have noticed earlier today, TEPCO reported a level of radiation that was insanely high — 10 million times the usual level — coming from the water at a Fukushima reactor. This was very wrong, so much so that we took down our posts about this.
  • correctionsTEPCO apologized — while noting the amount was a still-very-high 100,000 times its normal level. “I am very sorry,” said TEPCO’s vice president, Sakae Muto. ”I would like to make sure that such a mistake will not happen again.” Good apology, Muto. source
12:04 // 3 years ago
10:07 // 3 years ago