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July 14, 2013
Regarding the KTVU-TV’s demeaning report of the pilots on July 12, ASIANA Airlines is reviewing possible legal action against KTVU-TV and the NTSB. … The reputation of the four pilots and of the company had been seriously damaged by this report.
A statement by Asiana Airlines • Revealing that the company that faced suffered a major plane crash last week may sue KTVU and the NTSB after a TV report falsely naming the pilots of the aircraft, using racially-offensive names, surfaced on Friday.
10:39 // 9 months ago
July 13, 2013
Earlier today, in response to an inquiry from a media outlet, a summer intern acted outside the scope of his authority when he erroneously confirmed the names of the flight crew on the aircraft. The NTSB does not release or confirm the names of crewmembers or people involved in transportation accidents to the media. We work hard to ensure that only appropriate factual information regarding an investigation is released and deeply regret today’s incident.
The NTSB, in a press release revealing that an intern released falsely confirmed the obviously-fake Asiana Airlines pilot names to KTVU earlier today. By the way, KTVU is far from the only San Francisco-area station that’s had blunders or embarrassing moments on air, but in most of those cases, there wasn’t obvious racism playing a factor. (Edit to clarify.)
1:03 // 9 months ago
July 11, 2013
I’m not an NFL player, but as a non-terrorist who happens to be a Jew, let me say that this is hogwash. It’s yellow journalism without any of the flair. Instead of Waksman asking why Aboushi deserves to be employed by the Jets, I think we should ask Yahoo! why they would publish a piece that accuses an NFL player of anti-Semitism without one solitary quote or piece of actual evidence. This is worse than your typical “keep your politics out of my sports” hit piece. It’s slander.
Dave Zirin (via brooklynmutt)

Yahoo Sports fell in the same trap as Jonathan Mael.

(Source: soupsoup, via brooklynmutt)

19:59 // 9 months ago

MLB’s new media coordinator compared an Muslim NFL rookie to a murder suspect, just because he’s of Palestinian heritage

In what might be one of the more ugh-worthy stories of the week, Jonathan Mael, an employee of Major League Baseball in charge of the league’s new media program, compared Oday Aboushi, a recently-drafted New York Jets player whose parents are Palestinian and who is a Muslim, to Aaron Hernandez, the New England Patriots tight end who was charged with first-degree murder in the death of Odin Lloyd. (It’s only one in a series of controversial racially-tinged attacks on Aboushi, the recent subject of an attack piece on Freedom Center, a site owned by noted anti-Muslim critic David Horowitz.) When Mael’s tweet was noticed by the public, a number of critics spoke up, notably at The Nation, The Electronic Intifada and The Daily Beast. Mael is a former intern for AIPAC, a lobbying group that supports pro-Israel policies; he apologized for his comment a short while ago, but it’s unclear if he will face further discipline.

19:35 // 9 months ago
July 10, 2013
If I were sitting in the courtroom with pad and pen, no one would notice or care. The pen may be mightier than the sword — and a picture may be worth a thousand words — but video cameras alter reality. Their very presence changes the people and events they seek to capture. And, just to keep those cliches rolling, although seeing is believing, what we project for others to see is influenced — and reality is altered — by the fact that a camera is recording that projection.
Washington Post columnist Kathleen Parker • Arguing against the usage of cameras in courtrooms, particularly in high-profile cases such as George Zimmerman’s trial. Another great point in this: “Meanwhile, the notion of the public’s right to know every detail of what is essentially a show trial suffers a paucity of veracity. If our concern were truly to better understand the machinations of the judicial system, as some have argued, we would record and broadcast all trial proceedings rather than only the ones that involve key elements of modern tabloid storytelling, namely sex, drugs, rock ’n’ roll — and race.”
21:15 // 9 months ago
July 9, 2013
22:44 // 9 months ago
July 1, 2013
brooklynmutt:

Did the new Crossfire start?
(via @WillBrinson)

I imagine, as this panel discussion takes place, Jeff Zucker is in his lair at the CNN studios in Atlanta, rigidly stroking a Chihuahua, wondering how his plan to ruin cable news is going.

brooklynmutt:

Did the new Crossfire start?

(via @WillBrinson)

I imagine, as this panel discussion takes place, Jeff Zucker is in his lair at the CNN studios in Atlanta, rigidly stroking a Chihuahua, wondering how his plan to ruin cable news is going.

21:11 // 9 months ago
June 21, 2013

kohenari:

And now, after that last post on good apologies, it’s right back to my usual Terrible Apologies:

For being only forty-five seconds, there’s so much in this public apology that doesn’t work, it’s hard to know quite where to begin.

Deen repeatedly references “the wrong” without actually talking about it; she says that she wants “to grow from this” without explaining what that will entail; and she seems to suggest that it only recently occured to her that “Inappropriate hurtful language is totally, totally unacceptable” (which is, of course, definitional).

But, of course, the most noteworthy failure is that it’s hard to escape the sense that Deen’s apology is entirely motivated by her desire to avoid the extreme cost of being identifed as a racist. Indeed, she concludes by asking for forgiveness not from the people she directly offended but from “my children, my team, my fans, my partners.” The references to fans and especially her team and partners comes precariously close to just saying what she really means, “Please don’t let this cost me anything.”

The apology didn’t work. (Neither did the second, nor the third.) Paula Deen just lost her job with the Food Network

17:03 // 10 months ago
June 1, 2013
Today in the Huffington Post being the Huffington Post. (BTW: While this isn’t the only article this week on this topic, a story brought to light by the upcoming book Slimed!: An Oral History of Nickelodeon’s Golden Age, the difference here is that those articles didn’t explicitly call the show racist, but instead raised interesting points about racial diversity in ’90s cable television.)
(via @BuzzFeedAndrew)

Today in the Huffington Post being the Huffington Post. (BTW: While this isn’t the only article this week on this topic, a story brought to light by the upcoming book Slimed!: An Oral History of Nickelodeon’s Golden Age, the difference here is that those articles didn’t explicitly call the show racist, but instead raised interesting points about racial diversity in ’90s cable television.)

(via @BuzzFeedAndrew)

13:55 // 10 months ago
May 28, 2013
Such offensive epithets would no doubt draw wide-spread disapproval among the NFL’s fan base. Yet the national coverage of Washington’s NFL football team profits from a term that is equally disparaging to Native Americans.
A letter, signed by ten members of Congress, asking Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder to change the team’s name, saying it’s a derogatory term towards Native Americans. The team has repeatedly said that they do not consider the name offensive, and have no plans to change the name. Polling on the football team’s name favors keeping it in place. The effort was led by Rep. Eni F.H. Faleomavaega, the congressman for the American Samoa.
17:43 // 11 months ago