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September 26, 2013

Study: Preparations for the 2022 World Cup will kill thousands

  • 4,000 migrant workers are expected to die during construction of the various facilities needed for Qatar to host the World Cup in 2022, according to a new report from the International Trade Union Confederation. The organization says unsafe working conditions are currently contributing to the deaths of approximately 12 workers per week, Those practices include the refusal of free drinking water, withholding of wages, and confiscation of passports to prevent workers from leaving. source
15:44 // 10 months ago
August 26, 2013
The above image was released via Twitter on Sunday morning, by an established Egypt blogger known as The Big Pharaoh, and seeks to drive home just how fractured relations between various Middle Eastern nations (along with a few non-regional parties) really are.  (Photo via @thebigpharaoh) source

The above image was released via Twitter on Sunday morning, by an established Egypt blogger known as The Big Pharaoh, and seeks to drive home just how fractured relations between various Middle Eastern nations (along with a few non-regional parties) really are.  (Photo via @thebigpharaoh) source

15:19 // 12 months ago
June 20, 2013
15:58 // 1 year ago
December 8, 2012
This is not where we wanted to be at the end of the meeting, I assure you. It certainly isn’t where we need to be in order to prevent islands from going under and other unimaginable impacts.
Kieren Keke, Foreign Minister of Nauru • Speaking on the agreement at a UN conference in Qatar today to extend provisions of the Kyoto Protocol on climate change through 2020. This may sound hopeful on its face, but the agreement is far short of of the level of coordination needed to impact the changing climate, as it only covers about 15% of global emissions. Canada, Russia, New Zealand, and Japan (where, notably, Kyoto is located) all opted out of the deal. A major sticking point in the negotiations — how new emissions standards would impact wealthy, industrialized nations versus developing ones, and securing funding from the richer states to help the poorer meet those marks. The conference reaffirmed a pledge to come to a global treaty by 2015, a lofty goal considering the competing interests involved, and also not a delay anybody like the minister quoted above wants to consider. For tiny islands like Nauru or Kiribati, the climate change debate isn’t just academic. source
17:10 // 1 year ago
July 12, 2012
Top Syrian diplomat defects: Nawaf Fares, the Syrian ambassador to Iraq, has defected and switched to the opposition side, backing away from Bashar al-Assad’s leadership. Syria says Fares was fired, though he defected on his own beforehand and is now in Qatar. Fares is the first senior Syrian diplomat to turn on Assad and move to the opposition side.

Top Syrian diplomat defects: Nawaf Fares, the Syrian ambassador to Iraq, has defected and switched to the opposition side, backing away from Bashar al-Assad’s leadership. Syria says Fares was fired, though he defected on his own beforehand and is now in Qatar. Fares is the first senior Syrian diplomat to turn on Assad and move to the opposition side.

10:43 // 2 years ago
September 20, 2011
Al Jazeera’s news director resigns. Was it due to WIkiLeaks? Today’s big mystery revolves around the fate of Wadah Khanfar, the news director of the Qatar-based news organization, who resigned not long after some unflattering information linked from Wikileaks diplomatic cables. The cables suggested that Khanfar went out of his way to assure U.S. government officials that it was being fair in its coverage of the Iraq War, sharing information with a diplomat and going so far as to spike a story. So, was that it? BTW, Khanfar’s replacement is Sheik Ahmad bin Jasem bin Muhammad Al-Thani, a member of the Qatari royal family, which won’t help refute claims that the news organization is under the country’s influence. (thanks climateadaptation)

Al Jazeera’s news director resigns. Was it due to WIkiLeaks? Today’s big mystery revolves around the fate of Wadah Khanfar, the news director of the Qatar-based news organization, who resigned not long after some unflattering information linked from Wikileaks diplomatic cables. The cables suggested that Khanfar went out of his way to assure U.S. government officials that it was being fair in its coverage of the Iraq War, sharing information with a diplomat and going so far as to spike a story. So, was that it? BTW, Khanfar’s replacement is Sheik Ahmad bin Jasem bin Muhammad Al-Thani, a member of the Qatari royal family, which won’t help refute claims that the news organization is under the country’s influence. (thanks climateadaptation)

23:35 // 2 years ago
May 18, 2011
2:07 // 3 years ago
April 14, 2011
Editorial priorities are weighed on a number of factors at any given moment. All news organizations have faced these pressures, but despite this and the challenging terrain in Bahrain, we have covered events in the country extensively.
Spokesman for Qatar-based/funded Al Jazeera on the news channel’s perceived lack of coverage surrounding the protests in Bahran. (via soupsoup)
10:49 // 3 years ago
April 5, 2011

Libyan rebels plan to begin exporting oil themselves

This is a big deal for the opposition council. The Libyan rebel government’s deal with Qatar to export oil has obvious benefits to their cause, and they aren’t strictly economic. One aspect of the Libyan struggle we can’t overlook is the need for others to perceive their legitimacy — the more the rebellion shows a unified, proactive, and competent front, the more pressure it may put on Gaddafi’s beleaguered allies to desert him. The immediately refused rebel ceasefire offer was a good example, and this follows suit — the practical proof that oil exports can resume despite Gaddafi’s efforts to the contrary is another psychological victory against a regime that’s already reported as suffering key defections by officials. source

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16:04 // 3 years ago
March 28, 2011
We are producing about 100,000 to 130,000 barrels a day. We can easily up that to about 300,000 a day.
Libyan rebel spokesman Ali Tarhouni • The rebels have reportedly signed a deal with Qatar under which they’ll export oil to the nearby country. Ahh, oil politics, we’ve missed you. source (viafollow)
23:46 // 3 years ago