The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

September 29, 2012
Former New York Times publisher Arthur O. Sulzberger, who led the paper as its publisher for 29 years (between 1963 and 1992), and was the company’s chairman until 1997, has died. He was 86 years old. To give you an idea of his impact on the paper: He introduced the paper’s incredibly popular (and widely-imitated) feature sections, and also played a role in the paper’s deciding to print the Pentagon Papers in 1971. During this period, the paper grew to be one of the largest and most-well-regarded in the world. An important journalistic figure who will be missed.

Former New York Times publisher Arthur O. Sulzberger, who led the paper as its publisher for 29 years (between 1963 and 1992), and was the company’s chairman until 1997, has died. He was 86 years old. To give you an idea of his impact on the paper: He introduced the paper’s incredibly popular (and widely-imitated) feature sections, and also played a role in the paper’s deciding to print the Pentagon Papers in 1971. During this period, the paper grew to be one of the largest and most-well-regarded in the world. An important journalistic figure who will be missed.

13:12 // 1 year ago
October 16, 2011

Publishers freak out because Amazon’s cutting into their territory

  • cause Amazon, with its growing clout as an e-book outlet and ability to work around the traditional system, has made significant inroads as a publisher of books, with at least one bestseller to its name. They will publish 122 books this fall in electronic and physical form.
  • reaction Large publishers and agents are starting to freak out. In one case, Hawaiian writer Kiana Davenport angered the publisher of a forthcoming book and got sued because she dared use Amazon to self-publish an old anthology no publisher wanted. source

Read ShortFormBlogFollow

23:47 // 2 years ago
February 15, 2011
Our philosophy is simple - when Apple brings a new subscriber to the app, Apple earns a 30 percent share; when the publisher brings an existing or new subscriber to the app, the publisher keeps 100 percent and Apple earns nothing.
Steve Jobs (who’s still on medical leave) • In a statement announcing the new App Store subscription service, which reveals a pretty awesome financial path for publishers of all stripes. Apple will take their 30 percent revenue share if they lead to the subscription; if the publisher does it, they keep 100 percent. One interesting thing to note is the way that the service handles consumer information. Many magazine publishers make money by using consumer information from their subscriber base – a move somewhat at odds with Apple’s App Store model. In a compromise move, Apple will allow consumers to say how much information they want to give out. The overall model is similar to that of The Daily, which launched last month to general praise. source (viafollow)
10:50 // 3 years ago