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October 1, 2011
20:45 // 3 years ago
inothernews:

So, not only do high-ranking members of the New York City Police Department mace innocent protestors, they also arrest New York Times journalists doing their jobs.
Does that idiot mayor Michael Bloomberg realize that he and the NYPD are just agitating the protestors more?

Pretty much. Don’t arrest journalists. It’s bad for everyone involved.

inothernews:

So, not only do high-ranking members of the New York City Police Department mace innocent protestors, they also arrest New York Times journalists doing their jobs.

Does that idiot mayor Michael Bloomberg realize that he and the NYPD are just agitating the protestors more?

Pretty much. Don’t arrest journalists. It’s bad for everyone involved.

(via firthofforth)

19:04 // 3 years ago
I think it’s a tactic and a valid tactic to call attention to a problem. Wall Street is out of control. We have three imbalances in this country—the imbalance between imports and exports, the imbalance between employer power and working power, and the imbalance between the real economy and the financial economy. We need to bring back balance to the financial economy, and calling attention to it and peacefully protesting is a very legitimate way of doing it.
AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka • Talking on C-SPAN Friday about mass protests in general and Occupy Wall Street in particular. Trumka’s endorsement of the protests shadows the growing support the movement is getting from such labor unions as the Transport Workers Union. If the movement grows among labor unions, that will help swell the growth of the movement significantly. source (viafollow)
16:43 // 3 years ago
September 27, 2011
So even as the members of Occupy Wall Street seem unorganized and, at times, uninformed, their continued presence creates a vexing problem for the Police Department.
New York Times writer Joseph Goldstein • In an article about the NYPD’s seemingly poor handling of Occupy Wall Street. The article as a whole makes intelligent and understandable points (and goes in-depth about the use of pepper spray on Saturday), but this particular line really bothered us. This comes off as The New York Times ripping the dirty hippies for being dirty hippies, which is just an approach they should not take here. It’s condescending and shows a lack of respect for the protesters. What if they just dropped a line like that into an article about the Tea Party? It’d get savaged by the blogs! Instead of just interviewing your sources at the NYPD, Mr. Goldstein, why don’t you interview the protesters (who, we don’t know if you’ve noticed, have been clamoring for media attention), instead of discretely calling them idiots? You did it before, with this article. This piece feels like you’re writing an article about one side of the story. source (viafollow)
10:13 // 3 years ago
September 25, 2011
inothernews:

Front page, New York Daily News, Sunday 25 September 2011.
(via the Newseum)

Although the headline’s a little tasteless, it’s certainly less tasteless than the New York Post’s cover, which doesn’t even cover Occupy Wall Street, but instead gives Sly Stone a bit of a blindsiding headline.

inothernews:

Front page, New York Daily News, Sunday 25 September 2011.

(via the Newseum)

Although the headline’s a little tasteless, it’s certainly less tasteless than the New York Post’s cover, which doesn’t even cover Occupy Wall Street, but instead gives Sly Stone a bit of a blindsiding headline.

10:49 // 3 years ago
September 24, 2011
23:57 // 3 years ago

In this short clip, a protester says something to a police officer. Less than two seconds later, he’s on the ground. Again. WTF? (Side note: The NY Post’s headline for this mess? “March Madness.”)

23:37 // 3 years ago
September 20, 2011

newsweek:

In what may be the most documented arrests ever, at least five Wall Street protesters were detained on Tuesday to the chants of “what’s your name!,” “fucking cowards,” and the like. 

A spokesperson for the protesters writes via email:

The first arrest was a protester who objected to the police removing a tarp that was protecting our media equipment from the rain. The police said that the tarp constituted a tent, in spite of it not being a habitat in any way. Police continued pressuring protesters with extralegal tactics, saying that a protester on a bullhorn was breaking a law. The protester refused to cease exercising his first amendment rights and was also arrested. Then the police began to indiscriminately attempt to arrest protesters, many of them unsheathed their batons, in spite of the fact that the protest remained peaceful. One of the protesters received a large gash on their leg, another lost a tooth. Multiple police tackled a protester and sat on him as he continually warned them that he was experiencing an asthma attack. One of the medics on site informed the police that they needed to call an ambulance because this was a potentially fatal circumstance. They ignored him. We have no current information on this protester, but we hope that he hasn’t been murdered by the police.

One fascinating police tactic of note: the presence of officers with video cameras recording the arrests, likely to be used to defend against the inevitable accusations of brutality.

Wowza. Will be keeping an eye on this today.

13:17 // 3 years ago
September 18, 2011

Sent to us via Twitter user Eric Brown, this five minute clip from last night does a good job capturing the mood of the still-budding protests near Wall Street in New York City. “This is a group of passionate, concerned, and intelligent people,” Brown writes. “Their behavior in the park suggested a great appreciation of democracy, and a desire to cut through the clogged media and political channels to communicate a message they feel is incredibly important.” Brown notes a large police presence was there when he shot this last night, but both sides were peaceful. Great clip. source

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22:45 // 3 years ago
The method of protest that we’re using, the purpose is to interrupt the flow of Wall Street.
Occupy Wall Street protester Joe Sharkey • Revealing that the group’s purpose is to make it difficult for workers to get around the protesters — a method that will see its first real test tomorrow, when an actual work day hits. While the protest has remained largely peaceful, things could start to get thorny in the next day. Starkey says tomorrow is a “crucial period” for the group of roughly 1,500 to 2,000 protesters. ”We are going to ride and coordinate and communicate,” he said. “The process takes a long time.” The protests, put together by anti-consumerism magazine AdBusters, have been planned for a number of months. source (viafollow)
22:33 // 3 years ago