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March 15, 2013

Federal judge finds FBI’s usage of national security letters unconstitutional

  • 16.5k the number of ultra-secret national security letters sent by the FBI, with gag orders, in 2011. The agency has sent hundreds of thousands of them over the years—and appears to have finally met its match in the form of a federal judge who ruled on Friday that the orders were unconstitutional. The case, involving an unnamed telecom firm, prevented the firm from speaking about the case to the public. source
19:45 // 1 year ago
December 28, 2012
14:32 // 1 year ago
December 26, 2012
9:45 // 1 year ago
December 11, 2012
So the week of The Daily’s closing, they break a story revealing that city buses across the country are adding audio-recording mechanisms to eavesdrop on conversations. What terrible timing for a scoop. :/

So the week of The Daily’s closing, they break a story revealing that city buses across the country are adding audio-recording mechanisms to eavesdrop on conversations. What terrible timing for a scoop. :/

22:26 // 1 year ago
September 28, 2012
10:13 // 1 year ago
September 26, 2012

Turns out Apple, Google engineers have passwords as bad as yours and mine

  • 100GB worth of website logs remained publicly available on the servers of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Some of the unencrypted plaintext files included user names, passwords, and users’ site activity.
  • 100k computer engineers, including employees of Apple and Google, had their personal data compromised by the oversight. IEEE is the world’s largest professional trade organization for computer engineers, and the leak affected nearly one-fourth of its 411,000 members. So what was the most common password? "123456" source
13:04 // 1 year ago
September 4, 2012

Hacker group leaks list of 1 million Apple device identifiers, says it’s from FBI

  • 12 million the number of Apple iOS device identifiers in the FBI’s custody, according to AntiSec
  • 1 million the number of device numbers AntiSec publicly leaked early Tuesday morning source

» Wait a sec … the FBI had them? Well, funny story about that. Back in March, the group says they gained access to a computer owned by an FBI official. Just by chance, they found a file on the agent’s desktop titled “NCFTA_iOS_devices_intel.csv” — a long list of 12 million UDID identifiers for iOS devices, along with a number of other pieces of personal info. AntiSec released just 1 million of the UDID numbers (which you can analyze here to see if you were nailed), but it’s worth keeping in mind that the odds may not be super-high of getting hit. There are 410 million iOS devices on the market, as of July. The problem for many is that the FBI reportedly had this info in the first place. What did they need it for, and why was it sitting on some dude’s desktop?

UPDATE: The FBI says that there is “no evidence” they had a file like the one described above.

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8:11 // 2 years ago
August 13, 2012
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August 7, 2012
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August 2, 2012
7:36 // 2 years ago