The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

March 9, 2013
breakingnews:

Egypt soccer tragedy ruling prompts unrest on both sides
Al Jazeera: An Egyptian court has upheld death sentences handed to 21 soccer fans for their role in a stadium riot in which more than 70 people were killed last year.
The judge also acquitted seven of the nine police officers previously convicted over the disaster, which happened in the Suez city of Port Said at the end of a match between Cairo team Al-Ahly and local side Al-Masry.
The verdict has prompted anger on both sides. Al-Ahly fans, whose number made up most of the dead, were angered at the the decision to acquit the police officers. They stormed the HQ of the Egypt soccer federation in Cairo, setting it alight. In Port Said, several hundred people, many of them relatives of the defendants, gathered outside the local government offices to vent their anger over the verdicts.
Photo: A scene at the Port Said stadium disaster in February 2012. (Reuters)

The original verdict led to a series of violent riots in the country in January and February.

breakingnews:

Egypt soccer tragedy ruling prompts unrest on both sides

Al Jazeera: An Egyptian court has upheld death sentences handed to 21 soccer fans for their role in a stadium riot in which more than 70 people were killed last year.

The judge also acquitted seven of the nine police officers previously convicted over the disaster, which happened in the Suez city of Port Said at the end of a match between Cairo team Al-Ahly and local side Al-Masry.

The verdict has prompted anger on both sides. Al-Ahly fans, whose number made up most of the dead, were angered at the the decision to acquit the police officers. They stormed the HQ of the Egypt soccer federation in Cairo, setting it alight. In Port Said, several hundred people, many of them relatives of the defendants, gathered outside the local government offices to vent their anger over the verdicts.

Photo: A scene at the Port Said stadium disaster in February 2012. (Reuters)

The original verdict led to a series of violent riots in the country in January and February.

7:58 // 1 year ago
February 2, 2013
csmonitor:

Week In Review: Upheaval in EgyptBy Ariel Zirulnick, Staff writer
Unrest spread to provinces along the Suez Canal, Egypt’s economically and strategically critical waterway, prompted by locals’ anger over a court verdict passed down on Jan. 25. Residents poured into the streets in protest and clashed with police after 21 localmen were sentenced to death for their role in last year’s deadly soccer riots.
Police were completely overwhelmed by the angry crowds, and President Mohamed Morsi had to call the Egyptian Army out on the streets and declare a state of emergency. 
As Kristen Chick reported, the protests themselves were prompted by the court verdict, but long-simmering anger about their alienation from Cairo was just waiting to be touched off. 

But in the city, where initial wire reports indicated that as many as 47 people were killed and more than 1,000 injured since Jan. 26, the anger and sense of alienation from the rest of Egypt is ferocious. As anger at Mr. Morsi burns hotter with each death, Port Said exemplifies the lack of trust in state institutions that is present not just here but in much of Egypt, and the challenge Morsi faces in reasserting authority and establishing security in that environment. 
More reading on Egypt: 
Egyptians work to reclaim a Tahrir tainted by sexual assault
Egypt shudders, with leadership nowhere in sight
As Egyptians flout curfew, Army warns of ‘collapse’
Photo: Egyptians flee tear gas fired by security forces during an anti-President Mohammed Morsi protest in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Friday. Photo by: Amr Nabil/AP 


The court verdict that set off the deadly fracas last week was a series of 21 death sentences handed down for people involved in the deadly Port Said soccer riot of last year.

csmonitor:

Week In Review: Upheaval in Egypt
By Staff writer

Unrest spread to provinces along the Suez Canal, Egypt’s economically and strategically critical waterway, prompted by locals’ anger over a court verdict passed down on Jan. 25. Residents poured into the streets in protest and clashed with police after 21 localmen were sentenced to death for their role in last year’s deadly soccer riots.

Police were completely overwhelmed by the angry crowds, and President Mohamed Morsi had to call the Egyptian Army out on the streets and declare a state of emergency. 

As Kristen Chick reported, the protests themselves were prompted by the court verdict, but long-simmering anger about their alienation from Cairo was just waiting to be touched off. 

But in the city, where initial wire reports indicated that as many as 47 people were killed and more than 1,000 injured since Jan. 26, the anger and sense of alienation from the rest of Egypt is ferocious. As anger at Mr. Morsi burns hotter with each death, Port Said exemplifies the lack of trust in state institutions that is present not just here but in much of Egypt, and the challenge Morsi faces in reasserting authority and establishing security in that environment. 

More reading on Egypt: 

Egyptians work to reclaim a Tahrir tainted by sexual assault

Egypt shudders, with leadership nowhere in sight

As Egyptians flout curfew, Army warns of ‘collapse’

Photo: Egyptians flee tear gas fired by security forces during an anti-President Mohammed Morsi protest in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Friday. Photo by: Amr Nabil/AP 

The court verdict that set off the deadly fracas last week was a series of 21 death sentences handed down for people involved in the deadly Port Said soccer riot of last year.

13:17 // 1 year ago
January 29, 2013
breakingnews:

Political struggles could cause collapse of Egypt
Reuters: The struggle between political forces in Egypt could ‘lead to the collapse of the state,’ the country’s army chief says.
In a posting to the army’s Facebook page, General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi said political and economic issues now represented a ‘real threat’ to security.
Photo: Protesters gather near a tank as they defy a curfew in the city of Port Said on Monday (Reuters)

That’s very problematic to hear. The country is particularly susceptible to such difficulties at the moment.

breakingnews:

Political struggles could cause collapse of Egypt

Reuters: The struggle between political forces in Egypt could ‘lead to the collapse of the state,’ the country’s army chief says.

In a posting to the army’s Facebook page, General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi said political and economic issues now represented a ‘real threat’ to security.

Photo: Protesters gather near a tank as they defy a curfew in the city of Port Said on Monday (Reuters)

That’s very problematic to hear. The country is particularly susceptible to such difficulties at the moment.

8:49 // 1 year ago
January 27, 2013

Unrest over sentences in soccer protests continues in Egypt

  • 30+ the number of people killed during a major protest over death sentences handed out by an Egyptian court
  • 3+ people killed in another round of unrest during a mass funeral held in Port Said for the people killed on Saturday
  • 400+ people injured during the latest round of unrest, which is rooted in a deadly set of soccer riots last year source

Follow our TumblrSend us a TweetBe our Facebook pal

12:21 // 1 year ago
January 26, 2013


breakingnews:

At least 30 dead in clashes over verdict in Egypt soccer riots
Reuters: Clashes in Egypt’s Port Said killed at least 30 people Saturday, including two soccer players. The riots erupted after a judge sentenced 21 people to death for a February 2012 soccer fight which killed 74 fans cheering for Cairo’s Al-Ahly team.
After the ruling, residents in Port Said tried to storm the city’s prison and free the defendants in the case. 
The clashes follow violence brought on by anger at Egyptian President Morsi on Friday, the two-year anniversary of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Nine people died in those clashes, bringing the total from both outbursts to 39.
Photo: Al Ahly fans, also known as ‘Ultras,’ celebrate and shout slogans in front of the Al Ahly club after hearing the final verdict of the 2012 Port Said massacre in Cairo Saturday. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters)

While apparently our death toll figures culled from initial reports of this terrible riot last year ran a bit high, it still turned out as be over seventy fans left dead in a brutal melee. Now, the aftermath of that grisly scene has spawned its own fatal encounter.

breakingnews:

At least 30 dead in clashes over verdict in Egypt soccer riots

ReutersClashes in Egypt’s Port Said killed at least 30 people Saturday, including two soccer players. The riots erupted after a judge sentenced 21 people to death for a February 2012 soccer fight which killed 74 fans cheering for Cairo’s Al-Ahly team.

After the ruling, residents in Port Said tried to storm the city’s prison and free the defendants in the case. 

The clashes follow violence brought on by anger at Egyptian President Morsi on Friday, the two-year anniversary of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Nine people died in those clashes, bringing the total from both outbursts to 39.

Photo: Al Ahly fans, also known as ‘Ultras,’ celebrate and shout slogans in front of the Al Ahly club after hearing the final verdict of the 2012 Port Said massacre in Cairo Saturday. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters)

While apparently our death toll figures culled from initial reports of this terrible riot last year ran a bit high, it still turned out as be over seventy fans left dead in a brutal melee. Now, the aftermath of that grisly scene has spawned its own fatal encounter.

14:49 // 1 year ago