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May 3, 2011

Sony gaming site hacked: Stop us if you’ve heard this one before

  • 24.5M number of Sony Online Entertainment users possibly affected by ANOTHER hack job
  • 20k number of credit card numbers that could’ve been exposed to evil hackers
  • off the status of the network, which means that Sony has TWO online gaming networks offline source

» Somebody has a security problem: While Sony Online Entertainment isn’t the juggernaut that the PlayStation Network is (and Sony says the financial data they possibly stole was old), it nonetheless makes the company look incredibly bad. This hack, by the way, happened roughly two weeks ago, around the same time as the PSN hack. Who wants to bet that they got hacked because of the way they handled the Geohot mess? Raise your hand. (via @The_CopyEditor)

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0:46 // 3 years ago
May 1, 2011

PlayStation Network breach could cost credit card firms millions

  • $1.5B the amount the PlayStation Network data breach could cost Sony, according to analysts
  • $300M the amount Sony’s data breach could cost credit card firms if consumers replace their cards
  • $3-$5 the amount it would cost card companies to replace a card affected by the breach source

» A big number, but small potatoes: The credit card industry makes a lot of money each year, and a $300 million charge, while not insignificant, is a drop in the bucket. In 2010, banks that distributed Visa and MasterCard cards — excluding American Express and Discover — made $2.12 billion in after-tax profit. So even if the potential cost is high, they could handle it.

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16:04 // 3 years ago
April 29, 2011

Security experts: Hackers tried to sell credit card database to Sony

  • 2.2 million the number of stolen credit card numbers security researchers say the PlayStation Network hackers made off with — based on conversations in underground forums
  • $100,000 the amount they’re looking to make off their bounty — which they even attempted to SELL BACK to Sony, though they reportedly ignored this naked attempt at ransom source

» Sony denies the claim: “To my knowledge there is no truth to the report that Sony was offered an opportunity to purchase the list,” said top Sony communications guy Patrick Seybold. Consultants for Trend Micro and iSEC Partners, along with other researchers who keep a close eye on these forums, suggest otherwise. So, who’s right? Hopefully it’s Sony.

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1:24 // 3 years ago
April 26, 2011

Sony’s bad news: The data breach that killed PlayStation’s cred

  • 75M number of users Sony’s PlayStation Network has; until now, they were just upset they couldn’t play
  • six number of days it took Sony to reveal that users’ data was likely ganked by a hacker
  • one number of weeks Sony expects the network to partially get back up to speed source

» Sen. Richard Blumenthal has your back, gamers: The Connecticut senator and former state attorney general wants Sony to eat the cost of protecting users’ identities. “PlayStation Network users should be provided with financial data security services,” he wrote in a letter, “including free access to credit reporting services, for two years, the costs of which should be borne by Sony.” Bro also wants Sony to get insurance to protect users from identity theft. To put it simply — Sony’s kind of screwed, guys.

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22:00 // 3 years ago
sonicbloom11:

The story from Reuters:

An unauthorized person stole names, addresses and other personal data belonging to about 77 million people who have accounts on Sony Electronics’ PlayStation Network, Sony said on Tuesday.
The “illegal and unauthorized person” got access to people’s names, addresses, email address, birthdates, usernames, passwords, logins, security questions and more, Sony said on its U.S. PlayStation blog.
Children with accounts established by their parents also may have had their data exposed, Sony said.
Sony, whose PlayStation online service has been down for about a week, said it saw no evidence that credit card numbers were stolen, but warned users that it could not rule out the possibility.
“Out of an abundance of caution, we are advising you that your credit card number (excluding security code) and expiration date may have been obtained,” Sony said.


Well this is pretty much the scariest thing ever to happen to gamers.

sonicbloom11:

The story from Reuters:

An unauthorized person stole names, addresses and other personal data belonging to about 77 million people who have accounts on Sony Electronics’ PlayStation Network, Sony said on Tuesday.

The “illegal and unauthorized person” got access to people’s names, addresses, email address, birthdates, usernames, passwords, logins, security questions and more, Sony said on its U.S. PlayStation blog.

Children with accounts established by their parents also may have had their data exposed, Sony said.

Sony, whose PlayStation online service has been down for about a week, said it saw no evidence that credit card numbers were stolen, but warned users that it could not rule out the possibility.

“Out of an abundance of caution, we are advising you that your credit card number (excluding security code) and expiration date may have been obtained,” Sony said.

Well this is pretty much the scariest thing ever to happen to gamers.

17:24 // 3 years ago
1:24 // 3 years ago
January 12, 2011
The lack of injunctive relief will … result in the loss of goodwill to licensees, encourage infringers to increase operations, and discourage anti-piracy enforcement which is great and irreparable harm.
A court document from Sony’s lawyers • Asking for a temporary restraining order to stop the spread of the Playstation 3 master key, which was released online earlier this month by Geohot (George Hotz), who originally jailbroke the iPhone, and the FAIL0VERFLOW group. It’s good to note that the PS3 was originally released with an Other OS feature, which (awesomely) allowed people to run Linux on their consoles. However, it was eventually turned off by Sony for security reasons, leading to the current chain of events. Streisand effect, anyone? source (viafollow)
11:15 // 3 years ago