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November 5, 2013
Mr. Paul has been a prolific op-ed writer in recent years, penning hundreds of pieces in The Times and other media outlets. But the body of his work is getting fresh attention from journalists as they uncover multiple cases of lifting other people’s work without giving them credit.
Jim McElhatton of The Washington Times • From the announcement that Rand Paul’s column, in conservative D.C. newspaper The Washington Times, is being cancelled amid widening plagiarism allegations against the Kentucky Senator. As we mentioned earlier today, Paul’s damage control strategy started to change, from duel threat to adviser-issued pseudo-admission. source
20:44 // 8 months ago
Adherence to a new approval process implemented by Sen. Paul will ensure proper citation and accountability in all collaborative works going forward.
Doug Stafford, senior adviser to Sen. Rand Paul • Making clear that his boss will be taking a closer look at his speeches going forward, in a written statement given to The Hill, after both The Rachel Maddow Show and Buzzfeed spotted evidence of plagiarism in some of Sen. Paul’s recent remarks. That’s a pretty big 180, considering Sen. Paul remained defiant on the matter just a few days ago, even going so far as to say he’d like to duel some of his critics.
14:43 // 8 months ago
February 12, 2013
Currently making his first public statements after a scandal: Jonah Lehrer. ”If I write again, then what I write will be fully fact-checked and footnoted,” he said.
MORE STUFF: What led Jonah Lehrer to this point?

Currently making his first public statements after a scandal: Jonah Lehrer. ”If I write again, then what I write will be fully fact-checked and footnoted,” he said.

MORE STUFF: What led Jonah Lehrer to this point?

13:06 // 1 year ago
September 14, 2012
11:47 // 1 year ago
August 31, 2012
Jonah Lehrer just lost his Wired job, too: With Lehrer’s reputation already in tatters after it was found he fabricated quotes in his most recent book, NYU professor and occasional Wired contributor Charles Seife (on the request of Wired), did an analysis of Lehrer’s Wired work. The above graphic shows what Seife found. As you see, only one of the 18 listed articles doesn’t have a single checkmark on his list of journalistic misdeeds. While Wired chose initially not to publish the piece, Slate had no problem throwing it on their site. The result? Wired just issued this statement: “Lehrer’s failure to meet WIRED editorial standards leaves us no choice but to sever the relationship.” Ouch.

Jonah Lehrer just lost his Wired job, too: With Lehrer’s reputation already in tatters after it was found he fabricated quotes in his most recent book, NYU professor and occasional Wired contributor Charles Seife (on the request of Wired), did an analysis of Lehrer’s Wired work. The above graphic shows what Seife found. As you see, only one of the 18 listed articles doesn’t have a single checkmark on his list of journalistic misdeeds. While Wired chose initially not to publish the piece, Slate had no problem throwing it on their site. The result? Wired just issued this statement: “Lehrer’s failure to meet WIRED editorial standards leaves us no choice but to sever the relationship.” Ouch.

20:57 // 1 year ago
August 20, 2012
I have decided that I will not be able to serve a second term as a Successor Fellow of the Yale Corporation. I am reexamining my professional life and I have recognized that, in order to focus on the core of my work, I will have to shed some of my other responsibilities.
Time and CNN journalist Fareed Zakaria • Revealing to Yale President Richard C. Levin his plans to resign from the school’s governing board, weeks after he received a major professional scare — getting suspended from his two main gigs after getting caught plagiarizing. (Both CNN and Time eventually accepted him back.) Zakaria likely had too much on his plate: “My service at Yale is the single largest commitment of time, energy, and attention outside of my writing and television work,” he also wrote in his note. Levin graciously accepted the note and thanked the journalist for his work.
20:01 // 1 year ago
August 10, 2012
16:32 // 1 year ago
July 30, 2012
Newly-unemployed author Jonah Lehrer may have questionable judgment about Dylan quotes, but he has decent taste in houses. He and his wife spent $2.25 million on this home, once owned by legendary architectural photographer Julius Shulman. Something tells us the mortgage payments might not be quite so easy after today.
CORRECTION: Wrong house. Updated with the correct photo. Still a nice house, though. Apologies for the mix-up.

Newly-unemployed author Jonah Lehrer may have questionable judgment about Dylan quotes, but he has decent taste in houses. He and his wife spent $2.25 million on this home, once owned by legendary architectural photographer Julius Shulman. Something tells us the mortgage payments might not be quite so easy after today.

CORRECTION: Wrong house. Updated with the correct photo. Still a nice house, though. Apologies for the mix-up.

23:15 // 1 year ago
When I asked about aspects of his interactions with Rosen, Lehrer provided a sketchy timeframe and contradictory specifics—he first told me that he had personally exchanged emails with Rosen, then attributed this supposed email exchange to his literary agent—then further claimed that Dylan’s management had approved the chapter after being sent a copy of Imagine. He added that Dylan’s management didn’t want their cooperation sourced in the book. But when I contacted Dylan’s management, they told me that they were unfamiliar with Lehrer, had never read his book, there was no bobdylan.com headquarters, and, to the best of their recollection, no one there had screened outtakes from No Direction Home for Lehrer. Confronted with this, Lehrer admitted that he had invented it.

Holy. Shit.  (via popsins)

Jonah Lehrer has since resigned from the New Yorker and his publisher is halting shipments of print copies of Imagine. (via capitalnewyork)

In other words, a slow news day in the world of journalism scandal. This is actually round two for Lehrer. As it is, Dylan says so much interesting stuff already — why do you have to make it up, anyway? (Update: Joe Hanson has pasted a version of the article on Google Docs, because the site is down.) 

(via capitalnewyork)

14:00 // 2 years ago
July 4, 2012

Shattered Glass, put together again? Disgraced journalist pushes for second chance as a lawyer

Remember Stephen Glass? The man at the center of a major Clinton-era journalistic scandal at The New Republic (shown above in film trailer form) is looking to make a comeback — as a lawyer. Glass, now 39, has poured tons of money into the effort, and has worked hard to rehabilitate himself and his image, even going through therapy. And his boss, trial lawyer Paul Zuckerman, is one of the strongest advocates for his push to get a California law license, giving him a second chance after reflecting on his own earlier substance abuse. ”People can say he is fooling me,” Zuckerman said. “But I truly know the man.”

11:27 // 2 years ago