The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

August 27, 2013
Generally, ESPN’s business interests will always be at odds with its journalism. It is not a journalism company. It’s an entertainment company. This is the age of journalism we live in, not just at ESPN but everywhere. Journalism is increasingly more corporate. When you get in bed with the devil, sooner or later you start growing your own horns.
A high-profile columnist for ESPN • Speaking off the record to The Nation about the media outlet’s decision to end a collaboration with PBS’ Frontline on the NFL’s concussion problems—this despite the fact that two journalists on ESPN’s payroll worked on the project, which includes a book and documentary, for more than a year. The lesson here? The NFL has a big contract with the network, and money talks.
19:52 // 7 months ago
May 29, 2013

chrismohney:

theclearlydope:

Great ad campaign by PBS but I’m pretty sure they just created all the new fall programming for TLC.

popculturebrain:

NY PBS Creates Ads With Fake Reality Shows | EW

Classic problem of actuality outrunning satire, the dilemma of our age really

Today in satire that’s so on point that we’re gonna probably see these shows.

10:30 // 10 months ago
November 3, 2012
pbsthisdayinhistory:

November 3, 1969: PBS is Founded
On November 3, 1969, PBS was created to provide educational televisionprogramming and services that reflect the diverse interests of theAmerican people.Today, nearly 90% of U.S. television households tune into PBS memberstations, and we are expanding our public service mission to digitalmedia. In September 2012, Americans watched more than 150 millionvideos across all of PBS’ web and mobile platforms.See how PBS is serving all Americans at valuepbs.org.
Image: Vintage PBS logo


A very happy 43rd birthday to PBS. Still going strong after all these years, and getting flung around in election-year political banter to boot.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

November 3, 1969: PBS is Founded

On November 3, 1969, PBS was created to provide educational television
programming and services that reflect the diverse interests of the
American people.

Today, nearly 90% of U.S. television households tune into PBS member
stations, and we are expanding our public service mission to digital
media. In September 2012, Americans watched more than 150 million
videos across all of PBS’ web and mobile platforms.

See how PBS is serving all Americans at valuepbs.org.

Image: Vintage PBS logo

A very happy 43rd birthday to PBS. Still going strong after all these years, and getting flung around in election-year political banter to boot.

(via newshour)

19:03 // 1 year ago
October 16, 2012
We haven’t heard any specifics from the Governor beyond Big Bird and cutting Planned Parenthood that’s gonna pay for that.
President Obama, decrying Mitt Romney’s unwillingness to specify his spending and cutting plans with any vivid or mathematically meaningful details. Mitt Romney’s response: “Of course it adds up.” 
21:36 // 1 year ago
October 9, 2012
19:30 // 1 year ago
October 3, 2012
We understand why you liked this, newshour. We understand. *solidarity*

We understand why you liked this, newshour. We understand. *solidarity*

21:38 // 1 year ago
March 7, 2012
BuzzFeed scoops Breitbart’s final scoop, which wasn’t really a scoop
In 1991, Barack Obama, then a student at Harvard, stepped into the fray of a major on-campus debate. Obama publicly supported a professor named Derrick Bell, who was at the center of a fight over diversity and the denial of tenure to a black female professor. Bell, however, was a controversial figure for spearheading an academic discipline called Critical Race Theory, which read issues of race and power into a legal context. This video became a major issue in recent weeks, as Andrew Breitbart, who died last week, planned to release this video as evidence of a major gotcha on Obama. But a funny thing happened on the way to the forum … Buzzfeed beat them to their own scoop. A roundup of what happened:
Breitbart Before Andrew Breitbart died last week, the conservative figure said he had something big from Obama’s Harvard days, and was about to release it when he died.
Buzzfeed However, the upstart political wing of Buzzfeed got there first, licensing the 1991 video from a Boston television station and posting hours before Breitbart’s folks could.
PBS But it appears that in the end, PBS beat both sites by a full four years, covering it in “The Choice 2008,” a Frontline special. Some scoop Breitbart got. source
» Allegations of selective editing … overruled: Breitbart’s folks claimed that the clip acquired by Andrew Kaczynski was selectively edited, and that their clip offered details that his didn’t. However, the PBS clip, posted hours later, appears to show the exact same scene, validating Kaczynski’s find. Now, Breitbart’s John Nolte has gone from attacking the veracity of BuzzFeed’s video to attacking editor-in-chief Ben Smith. Kaczynski says that, whatever the case, he was looking for this video long before Breitbart announced his find, totally punching holes in the whole thing. But here’s the thing that really kills it: You could watch this video and not even know it was controversial. (We watched it and saw a guy who looked like he was going to be president 20 years ago.) Perhaps a fitting end for Breitbart, a man whose journalistic legacy was at times flawed.
Follow ShortFormBlog

In 1991, Barack Obama, then a student at Harvard, stepped into the fray of a major on-campus debate. Obama publicly supported a professor named Derrick Bell, who was at the center of a fight over diversity and the denial of tenure to a black female professor. Bell, however, was a controversial figure for spearheading an academic discipline called Critical Race Theory, which read issues of race and power into a legal context. This video became a major issue in recent weeks, as Andrew Breitbart, who died last week, planned to release this video as evidence of a major gotcha on Obama. But a funny thing happened on the way to the forum … Buzzfeed beat them to their own scoop. A roundup of what happened:

  • Breitbart Before Andrew Breitbart died last week, the conservative figure said he had something big from Obama’s Harvard days, and was about to release it when he died.
  • Buzzfeed However, the upstart political wing of Buzzfeed got there first, licensing the 1991 video from a Boston television station and posting hours before Breitbart’s folks could.
  • PBS But it appears that in the end, PBS beat both sites by a full four years, covering it in “The Choice 2008,” a Frontline special. Some scoop Breitbart got. source

» Allegations of selective editing … overruled: Breitbart’s folks claimed that the clip acquired by Andrew Kaczynski was selectively edited, and that their clip offered details that his didn’t. However, the PBS clip, posted hours later, appears to show the exact same scene, validating Kaczynski’s find. Now, Breitbart’s John Nolte has gone from attacking the veracity of BuzzFeed’s video to attacking editor-in-chief Ben Smith. Kaczynski says that, whatever the case, he was looking for this video long before Breitbart announced his find, totally punching holes in the whole thing. But here’s the thing that really kills it: You could watch this video and not even know it was controversial. (We watched it and saw a guy who looked like he was going to be president 20 years ago.) Perhaps a fitting end for Breitbart, a man whose journalistic legacy was at times flawed.

Follow ShortFormBlog

20:47 // 2 years ago
August 12, 2011
nprfreshair:

nprdigitalsvcs:

NPR <3 PBS.
Our new designer Dan shows his love for our public television buddies.

Yes, that is a PBS tattoo. Hardcore. See you Monday, Tumblr.

Sure, this is hardcore. But if you want to be really hardcore, get a NET tattoo instead. Or possibly CBC.

nprfreshair:

nprdigitalsvcs:

NPR <3 PBS.

Our new designer Dan shows his love for our public television buddies.

Yes, that is a PBS tattoo. Hardcore. See you Monday, Tumblr.

Sure, this is hardcore. But if you want to be really hardcore, get a NET tattoo instead. Or possibly CBC.

16:25 // 2 years ago
July 5, 2011
17:12 // 2 years ago
June 6, 2011
We need to have robust New Jersey public broadcasting, but we need to have it in a way that is not continuing to cost the taxpayers and can be perceived as truly independent from state government.
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie • Describing his plan to have WNET take over public television coverage in New Jersey, as well as to offer up public radio coverage to stations in Pennsylvania and New York. A deal’s already in place. The decision is controversial to say the least — some New Jersey residents are concerned about losing local programming as a result of the plan, and over 100 people will lose their jobs — though they have the opportunity to reapply for similar jobs with WNET. Though officials reassure that donaations raised for public broadcasting “will stay in New Jersey,” this is kind of a crap move if you ask us. These services cost the state relatively little and their benefits are pretty high. And the state wouldn’t be able to get away with this move at all if they weren’t relatively small and adjacent to states with large public broadcasters already. source (viafollow)
20:33 // 2 years ago