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November 13, 2013

Here’s how much it costs Occupy to buy some toxic debts

  • $15M the amount of debt that activists allied with the Occupy movement recently bought and forgave as part of the group’s Rolling Jubilee project.
  • $400k the amount it actually cost for the activists to actually buy up all that debt. So why’d they do it? Simple: Exposure of how debt really works. “Our primary purpose was to spread information about the workings of this secondary debt market,” the group said. source
8:31 // 5 months ago
September 17, 2012

Occupy Wall Street anniversary marred by police crackdown

  • 100-plus Occupy Wall Street protesters have been arrested today, during demonstrations marking the protest movement’s one-year anniversary. While hundreds have shown up in New York’s financial district to show their continued support for the Occupy Wall Street movement, attendance numbers didn’t come close to matching those of prior assemblies, and the diminished showing left some wondering if the OWS movement is beginning to lose steam. source
14:44 // 1 year ago

thepoliticalnotebook:

It’s the anniversary of the Occupy movement, a movement which I made an effort to document over the course of this year through photography submissions from people who had witnessed or participated in rallies and protests across the US (and even across the pond, I received a few Occupy Londons, an Occupy Bristol, and even an Occupy Dublin). Above are just a handful of the photographs I collected from people. If you want to see the full collection, it’s housed here on The Political Notebook and also here on Pinterest

Here are some longreads, old and new, on Occupy, its origins and its future.

Photos: [1] Occupy Philadelphia Day 59. Eviction protests. Michael Albany. [2] Zuccotti Park. Fall 2011. Jack Massey. [3] UC Davis. Pepper spray cop. Brian Nguyen. [4] Occupy London, October 2011. Tahlia Hein. [5] Zuccotti, Fall 2011. Luis Antonio Thompson. [6] Zuccotti, Fall 2011. Bianca Farrow. [7] NYC, Fall 2011. Ceridwyn Asher. [8] Occupy Dallas, Fall 2011. Chris Wang. [9] Occupy London, November 30th. Allan Shaw.

Happy anniversary, Occupy.

(via bobbycaputo)

9:48 // 1 year ago
September 16, 2012

Occupy Wall Street, one year later: Hoping for fresh momentum

  • last year After gaining a strong level of momentum among activists, Occupy Wall Street grew into a worldwide movement that thousands took part in, but the movement was not without its critics, who claimed that the lack of focus prevented long-term change. Nonetheless, it pushed much exposure towards economic disparities in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis — and led to 1,800 arrests in New York City alone.
  • this year Months after protesters were pushed out of Zuccotti Park, the movement celebrates its one-year anniversary with more protests — but a much weaker base. Roughly 300 protesters showed up for protests Saturday, but a large protest planned for Monday morning might rekindle some of the political flames. Police say they are ready to deal with any issues that arise. Meanwhile, the inevitable think pieces are being written. source
14:04 // 1 year ago
July 19, 2012
17:31 // 1 year ago
May 1, 2012
Isn’t it crazy that we’re both Half-Kenyan dudes from Illinois who went to Harvard, who’ve been on the cover of Rolling Stone, and play basketball, and have resoundingly good looks?
Tom Morello, asked today by a reporter: “If you had one minute with Barack Obama, what would you say to him?” (via buzzfeed)

Quote of the day. 

(via buzzfeed)

16:02 // 1 year ago

Photos: The Occupy movement and the “May Day” general strike

Happy May Day: Here’s a selection of photos from the May 1st general strike, pushed by the Occupy movement, along with labor activists worldwide. As many as six have been arrested in New York City alone in the protests, intended to show the “1 percent” what life without the “99 percent” would be like. (From top left, via Photo Gallery, Swanksalot, Lennon Ying-Dah WongTakverPetteri SulonenHossam el-HamalawyBarbro Uppsala, Amine Ghrabi, and Trowbridge Estate.)

15:37 // 1 year ago
March 27, 2012
futurejournalismproject:

Of Total Income Increase in 2010…
Steven Rattner, a Wall Street executive and New York Times Op-Ed contributor, writes:

In 2010, as the nation continued to recover from the recession, a dizzying 93 percent of the additional income created in the country that year, compared to 2009 — $288 billion — went to the top 1 percent of taxpayers, those with at least $352,000 in income. That delivered an average single-year pay increase of 11.6 percent to each of these households.
Still more astonishing was the extent to which the super rich got rich faster than the merely rich. In 2010, 37 percent of these additional earnings went to just the top 0.01 percent, a teaspoon-size collection of about 15,000 households with average incomes of $23.8 million. These fortunate few saw their incomes rise by 21.5 percent.
The bottom 99 percent received a microscopic $80 increase in pay per person in 2010, after adjusting for inflation. The top 1 percent, whose average income is $1,019,089, had an 11.6 percent increase in income.

Steven Rattner, The New York Times. The Rich Get Even Richer.

Yikes. The balance is off.

futurejournalismproject:

Of Total Income Increase in 2010…

Steven Rattner, a Wall Street executive and New York Times Op-Ed contributor, writes:

In 2010, as the nation continued to recover from the recession, a dizzying 93 percent of the additional income created in the country that year, compared to 2009 — $288 billion — went to the top 1 percent of taxpayers, those with at least $352,000 in income. That delivered an average single-year pay increase of 11.6 percent to each of these households.

Still more astonishing was the extent to which the super rich got rich faster than the merely rich. In 2010, 37 percent of these additional earnings went to just the top 0.01 percent, a teaspoon-size collection of about 15,000 households with average incomes of $23.8 million. These fortunate few saw their incomes rise by 21.5 percent.

The bottom 99 percent received a microscopic $80 increase in pay per person in 2010, after adjusting for inflation. The top 1 percent, whose average income is $1,019,089, had an 11.6 percent increase in income.

Steven Rattner, The New York Times. The Rich Get Even Richer.

Yikes. The balance is off.

12:34 // 2 years ago
February 16, 2012
Occupy Wall Street files paperwork to become a Super PAC
Occupying from within the system: Today, OWS created a super PAC called the “The Occupy Wall Street Political Action Committee.” John Paul Thornton is the treasurer of the committee. “It’s going to be fairly democratic. We’ll take opinions on how much candidates need and in what areas,” Thornton said. The point of this super PAC is to raise money … to stop politicians from raising too much money. “I am out to get the bloated amounts of money out of politics but to do that, we need to support candidates looking to do that,” Thornton said. source
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Occupying from within the system: Today, OWS created a super PAC called the “The Occupy Wall Street Political Action Committee.” John Paul Thornton is the treasurer of the committee. “It’s going to be fairly democratic. We’ll take opinions on how much candidates need and in what areas,” Thornton said. The point of this super PAC is to raise money … to stop politicians from raising too much money. “I am out to get the bloated amounts of money out of politics but to do that, we need to support candidates looking to do that,” Thornton said. source

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23:41 // 2 years ago
February 12, 2012
climateadaptation:

The OWS roadshow came to my hometown of Northampton. The NYTimes covered their visit. Still unfocused. I stand by my original criticisms that OWS needs 1) a spokesperson and 2) run candidates for office.  

There’s a debate to be had about all this. OWS has essentially been trying to do wide-scale “anti-PR” for months, which makes sense considering it was spearheaded by an organization (Adbusters) that actively scorns a traditional approach to advertising and PR. My own opinion is that you can’t just assume taking an adversarial approach to traditional PR is a smart PR move on its own. But on the other hand, they’ve done anti-PR just long enough at this point that they can say it’s won them some success, possibly enough to feel that they don’t need to go with Plan B. But in case they change their minds, Jesse LaGreca certainly seems like a good choice. — Ernie @ SFB

climateadaptation:

The OWS roadshow came to my hometown of Northampton. The NYTimes covered their visit. Still unfocused. I stand by my original criticisms that OWS needs 1) a spokesperson and 2) run candidates for office.  

There’s a debate to be had about all this. OWS has essentially been trying to do wide-scale “anti-PR” for months, which makes sense considering it was spearheaded by an organization (Adbusters) that actively scorns a traditional approach to advertising and PR. My own opinion is that you can’t just assume taking an adversarial approach to traditional PR is a smart PR move on its own. But on the other hand, they’ve done anti-PR just long enough at this point that they can say it’s won them some success, possibly enough to feel that they don’t need to go with Plan B. But in case they change their minds, Jesse LaGreca certainly seems like a good choice. — Ernie @ SFB

12:00 // 2 years ago