The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

August 6, 2012

The new movie directed by Kathryn Bigelow, Academy Award-winning director of “The Hurt Locker”, portrays one version of the events that ultimately led to the death of Osama Bin Laden in his Abbottabad compound last year. While many eagerly await the film’s release, some have called it a propaganda film to boost President Obama’s image ahead of the election. To fight that notion, Sony has delayed the movie’s release from October to December, and a depiction of President Obama reportedly does not appear in the film. But, do you still think it was wrong for the White House to work with Bigelow and her team on production of the movie? source

Follow our TumblrSend us a TweetBe our Facebook pal

17:23 // 2 years ago
May 24, 2012
If this facility is so secret that the name cannot even be seen by the public, then why in the world would the Obama administration allow filmmakers to tour it?
Representative Peter King • Expressing his dismay over news that director Kathryn Bigelow and screenwriter Mark Boal were given access to Seal Team Six and information about the death of Osama bin Laden for their upcoming movie Zero Dark Thirty. Information which the Obama Administration has steadfastly defended from Freedom of Information Act inquiries, Congressional committees, and anyone else not involved in making movies about war-zones. Oh, and they received a tour of the complex that Seal Team Six used to prepare for the operation. You know, nothing special. source (viafollow)
15:25 // 2 years ago
I think as far as the case of Mr. Afridi is concerned, it was in accordance with Pakistani laws and by the Pakistani courts, and we need to respect each other’s legal processes.
Pakistan Foreign Ministry spokesperson Moazzam Ali Khan •  Discussing the sentence the country gave to Dr. Shakil Afridi for ”conspiring ‘to wage war against Pakistan or depriving it of its sovereignty,’ ‘concealing existence of a plan to wage war against Pakistan’ and ‘condemnation of the creation of the state and advocacy of abolition of its sovereignty’,” according to Pakistani newspaper Dawn. Afridi’s work running a vaccination program that doubled as a DNA-tracing program helped the U.S. find Osama bin Laden, making the decision to imprison Afridi one that has built tension between the two countries. Will the U.S. respect Pakistan’s decision?
11:32 // 2 years ago
May 23, 2012

Pakistani doctor who helped U.S. find Osama bin Laden jailed, fined

  • 33 years in prison for running a fake vaccination program in an attempt to find Osama bin Laden using DNA
  • $3,500 fine for his actions, which led to the U.S. finding and killing the al-Qaeda leader a year ago source

» And no, the U.S. isn’t happy: Previously, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said she hoped to see Shakil Afridi freed, as his work helped capture a pretty bad dude. Instead, Afridi is heading to jail, a move which will likely strain relations between the U.S. and Pakistan, who are currently locked in a diplomatic battle over Afghan War supply routes. (EDIT: We apologize for the inital error in the title. Total accident. Sorry guys.)

Follow ShortFormBlog • Find us on Twitter & Facebook

10:18 // 2 years ago
May 8, 2012
Making bombs is not that difficult. It’s the creative touch he adds, how they’re concealed, how they’re conceived. The printer bomb, for instance, was considered by bomb technicians around the world to be a brilliant stroke. So it boils down to one person, but one very dangerous person.
CBS correspondent and former Deputy Director of National Intelligence John Miller • Discussing the alleged creator of the latest “underwear bomb," Ibrahim Hassan al Asiri, who is considered supremely skilled at creating — and more importantly, cleverly hiding — dangerous weapons. The bomb was uncovered before it could get on a plane and acquired via a covert CIA operation in Yemen. FBI bomb experts are currently investigating the weapon in Virginia, which they note does not contain metal. (viafollow)
10:02 // 2 years ago
May 3, 2012
Osama bin Laden compound’s documents released; scour them now
So, what was al-Qaeda’s network like? After a year, we finally have insight at a level we never did before, from the Abbottabad compound where the al-Qaeda leader was killed almost exactly one year ago. The documents show the group’s struggle to keep a consistent message, with debates on how to market itself to appeal more to Muslims and how to best target the U.S. The New York Times has a pretty solid summary, but if you’re looking to dig in, our pal Matt has put everything in a Scribd document perfect for digging.

Osama bin Laden compound’s documents released; scour them now

So, what was al-Qaeda’s network like? After a year, we finally have insight at a level we never did before, from the Abbottabad compound where the al-Qaeda leader was killed almost exactly one year ago. The documents show the group’s struggle to keep a consistent message, with debates on how to market itself to appeal more to Muslims and how to best target the U.S. The New York Times has a pretty solid summary, but if you’re looking to dig in, our pal Matt has put everything in a Scribd document perfect for digging.

10:30 // 2 years ago
May 2, 2012

vinegarwilliams:

think-progress:

Front pages: 5/2/03 vs. 5/2/11

HT @nytjim

It’s almost funny, how sad it all is.

In other words: Bush declared a major victory, while Obama scored one.

0:48 // 2 years ago
May 1, 2012
reuters:

DEVELOPING:
U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Ryan Crocker upon his arrival at Bagram Air Base in Kabul, Afghanistan May 1, 2012. [REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque]
READ MORE: Obama lands in Afghanistan on OBL death anniversary

He knows how to show up at just the right time, doesn’t he?

reuters:

DEVELOPING:

U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Ryan Crocker upon his arrival at Bagram Air Base in Kabul, Afghanistan May 1, 2012. [REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque]

READ MORE: Obama lands in Afghanistan on OBL death anniversary

He knows how to show up at just the right time, doesn’t he?

15:59 // 2 years ago
Based on this above article, you might expect the threat from al-Qaeda is basically gone, right? Well, perhaps you should read these other articles first. As we pointed out in our analysis on Sunday, media outlets left and right are saying al-Qaeda’s threat is basically gone a year after Osama bin Laden’s death. Or it isn’t. 

Based on this above article, you might expect the threat from al-Qaeda is basically gone, right? Well, perhaps you should read these other articles first. As we pointed out in our analysis on Sunday, media outlets left and right are saying al-Qaeda’s threat is basically gone a year after Osama bin Laden’s death. Or it isn’t. 

10:00 // 2 years ago
April 29, 2012

One year after bin Laden’s death, how done is al-Qaeda? Depends on who you read.

So, when looking up stories on the upcoming one-year anniversary of Osama bin Laden's death, we noticed a bizarre trend: None of the stories seemed to agree with one another. Some seemed to suggest al-Qaeda was basically gone. Others suggested that they were still planning major terror attacks. Seeing this, we got an idea: What if we scored the stories based on the done-ness of al-Qaeda, from 1 to 10? Because one wire service’s “in ruins" is another national newspaper’s "far from defeated.” Check the results above, and take one major point from this: Not every story has an agreed-upon answer.

17:35 // 2 years ago