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March 20, 2012
Ever wonder what the ruins of the Titanic look like up close? Thanks to National Geographic, wonder no longer. Some stellar visuals gathered here, all thanks to the very difficult work of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, which spent many months poring over the below-the-ocean work. Oh, and spend a nice long while poring over the gallery. Trust us.

Ever wonder what the ruins of the Titanic look like up close? Thanks to National Geographic, wonder no longer. Some stellar visuals gathered here, all thanks to the very difficult work of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, which spent many months poring over the below-the-ocean work. Oh, and spend a nice long while poring over the gallery. Trust us.

23:40 // 2 years ago
March 9, 2012
Hollywood director takes love of the ocean to new extreme
James Cameron, director of Avatar and Titanic, sets world record for solo diving:  He set the record diving 5.1 miles below the surface of water in his 24-foot personal submarine, the Deepsea Challenger. Now, the director is preparing for a 6-hour trip to the Mariana Trench’s Challenger Deep, a place so deep that humans have not visited the site in 52 years. He’ll make the trip with a full array of 3D cameras in tow, as well as an 8-foot LED light array attached to the top of the sub, and plans for the journey are being documented by National Geographic. (photo via Extreme Tech) source
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James Cameron, director of Avatar and Titanic, sets world record for solo diving:  He set the record diving 5.1 miles below the surface of water in his 24-foot personal submarine, the Deepsea Challenger. Now, the director is preparing for a 6-hour trip to the Mariana Trench’s Challenger Deep, a place so deep that humans have not visited the site in 52 years. He’ll make the trip with a full array of 3D cameras in tow, as well as an 8-foot LED light array attached to the top of the sub, and plans for the journey are being documented by National Geographic. (photo via Extreme Tech) source

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16:32 // 2 years ago
November 25, 2011
This camera was found off the Pacific Ocean. With the help of some detective work from his followers on Google+, the guy who found it, Markus Thompson, managed to track down the owner. “Thanks to everyone who responded,” he wrote. “[It’s] proof that the google+ hive-mind can be utilized in force to complete a simple gesture like returning someones photos :)”

This camera was found off the Pacific Ocean. With the help of some detective work from his followers on Google+, the guy who found it, Markus Thompson, managed to track down the owner. “Thanks to everyone who responded,” he wrote. “[It’s] proof that the google+ hive-mind can be utilized in force to complete a simple gesture like returning someones photos :)”

16:34 // 2 years ago
February 7, 2011
Getting back to basic fears, shark attacks rise in 2010
Shark week? More like shark year: Reported shark attack rates reached their highest level since 2000 last year, topping out at seventy-nine. The most publicized were likely those in the Red Sea, where there were five attacks in four days, and four of those attacks were thought to have been done by just two sharks. Still, the biggest takeaway from this? Shark attacks are still, as ever, exceedingly rare, even with repeat offenders like the Red Sea duo stalking the waters. source
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Shark week? More like shark year: Reported shark attack rates reached their highest level since 2000 last year, topping out at seventy-nine. The most publicized were likely those in the Red Sea, where there were five attacks in four days, and four of those attacks were thought to have been done by just two sharks. Still, the biggest takeaway from this? Shark attacks are still, as ever, exceedingly rare, even with repeat offenders like the Red Sea duo stalking the waters. source

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14:10 // 3 years ago