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January 9, 2012
So Newt had to cancel an appearance today … because some apparent Ron Paul supporters (who may have been Occupy sympathizers) swarmed the entrance of his New Hampshire campaign HQ. Here’s a pic of them in action, via Capital Tonight.

So Newt had to cancel an appearance today … because some apparent Ron Paul supporters (who may have been Occupy sympathizers) swarmed the entrance of his New Hampshire campaign HQ. Here’s a pic of them in action, via Capital Tonight.

21:36 // 2 years ago
January 3, 2012
We’re here because we got pushed out of New York, but we’re also here because this is the heart of where all politics happen.
An Occupy Wall Street protester • Discussing why he made the move to one of D.C.’s two Occupy encampments. It appears the encampments stand a good chance of sticking around for a while longer, though — as the National Park Service considers the movement’s McPherson Square location a “24-hour vigil” and has applied the most liberal interpretation of the laws to the movement, and recently offered an extension of the permit for the Freedom Plaza encampment — which was initially supposed to end with the new year. So as a result, protesters who started hanging out at Zuccotti Park have started making their way to the encampments, which have recently passed the three-month mark. source (viafollow)
10:12 // 2 years ago
January 2, 2012
aheram:

#OTRP - Mitt Romney makes an appearance at Occupy the Rose Parade.

Looks like Jayel Aheram made an appearance at the parade. He has a few shots over at his blog. The L.A. Times, meanwhile, says that the occupiers who showed up got a mixed reaction from the crowd: "A group of onlookers on an apartment balcony cheered and waved, while some people in the grandstands booed. One man walked past some protesters and said, ‘You guys had your 15 minutes.’"  Ouch. Wait, were they looking for 15 minutes?

aheram:

#OTRP - Mitt Romney makes an appearance at Occupy the Rose Parade.

Looks like Jayel Aheram made an appearance at the parade. He has a few shots over at his blog. The L.A. Times, meanwhile, says that the occupiers who showed up got a mixed reaction from the crowd: "A group of onlookers on an apartment balcony cheered and waved, while some people in the grandstands booed. One man walked past some protesters and said, ‘You guys had your 15 minutes.’"  Ouch. Wait, were they looking for 15 minutes?

20:53 // 2 years ago
December 19, 2011
11:49 // 2 years ago
December 15, 2011
3:01 // 2 years ago
December 9, 2011

More thoughts on “Occupy Law & Order: SVU”

imwithkanye says: I’m actually quite annoyed by this. It’s one thing to protest but it’s another to disrupt a TV set (& people’s jobs - the crew? the 99%). L&O always uses headlines as back drops and would it be so bad to shine light on the rape that’s been happening?

» SFB says: That’s a fair point. They could’ve taken this energy in a different direction for sure. Certainly it’s not the most bizarre thing the Occupy movement’s been involved in. I think though, that there’s an effort not to get their movement co-opted by anyone, least of all a TV crew. But certainly a TV show that airs 12 times a day on TNT and makes clear that it’s ripped from the headlines isn’t really the enemy. — Ernie @ SFB

8:56 // 2 years ago
There are certainly some folks who feel really offended by the attempt to kind of use this very real, very living movement, this economic justice movement that’s making real change for working families in this country, to use it in some kind of story line in this dramatic cop show. There are probably other folks among us who think it’s just a fun excuse to get together and share in public.
Occupy Wall Street press team member Ian Shan • Explaining why Occupy protesters raided the filming of a Zuccotti Park-themed “Law & Order: SVU” episode late last night. The actual Occupy protesters heard about the protest and decided to stage a “mockupy” protest at the event, which sounds like an amazing idea. And much like a real Occupy protest, police cleared out the scene around 1 a.m. last night. This sounds like the most amazing idea, ever — hopefully most did it with a sense of humor instead of malicious intent. source (viafollow)
8:44 // 2 years ago
December 8, 2011

Was this necessary? Via Tumblr user eggznrice, who told us, “Please get on this as soon as you can! Craziness!” The Occupy Melbourne protester in this video, a young woman named Sarah, was wrapped in a “tent dress” when police chose to pull it off of her, using knives to cut it off. (The protesters were told that Tents were considered structures that would be removed, hence the interesting clothing choice.) Three other protesters complied with police in Monday’s incident; Sarah did not. In the end, she was wearing nothing but her underwear. The Victoria police’s Ethical Standards Department says it’s investigating an assault incident, and Occupy Melbourne is trying to encourage other Occupy movements to wear tents in solidarity. source

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10:53 // 2 years ago
December 4, 2011
Occupy DC needed to build wooden structure to draw police scrutiny
A rare flash point, in wood form: Unlike most of the Occupy movements across the country, the Occupy DC movement has largely remained fairly quiet, in part because of the city’s protest-heavy history and in part because McPherson Square is managed by the National Park Service, not the city. So, as you might imagine, they would have to do something special to draw police scrutiny. Here it is, according to the movement’s Web site: “A prefabricated wooden structure that had been designed by professional architects and engineers to provide shelter, warmth and space for General Assemblies during the winter months.” If they wanted to draw police scrutiny, it worked. If they were trying to hold General Assemblies, not so much. The structure — and the National Park Police’s attempt to get it removed — has brought about some fairly interesting moments tonight. This is one of the most fascinating moments of the whole Occupy affair. source
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A rare flash point, in wood form: Unlike most of the Occupy movements across the country, the Occupy DC movement has largely remained fairly quiet, in part because of the city’s protest-heavy history and in part because McPherson Square is managed by the National Park Service, not the city. So, as you might imagine, they would have to do something special to draw police scrutiny. Here it is, according to the movement’s Web site: “A prefabricated wooden structure that had been designed by professional architects and engineers to provide shelter, warmth and space for General Assemblies during the winter months.” If they wanted to draw police scrutiny, it worked. If they were trying to hold General Assemblies, not so much. The structure — and the National Park Police’s attempt to get it removed — has brought about some fairly interesting moments tonight. This is one of the most fascinating moments of the whole Occupy affair. source

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20:40 // 2 years ago
November 30, 2011

Two major Occupy encampments close; protests mostly end peacefully

  • 200+ number of people arrested during the closing of the Occupy L.A. encampment early Wednesday
  • 52 number of people arrested at Occupy Philly when their camp closed at roughly the same time source

» However … In a major difference between the end of a number of other protests (most notably Occupy Oakland), police did not have to pull out pepper spray to end these protests. The LAPD was very careful with their strategy in this department. Despite the mayor calling for the closure of the camp early Monday, the police department held off two days, giving protesters time to leave on their own. That thinned out the numbers. As for those that remained, they had some minor scuffles with police at first, but those eventually faded, and protesters only got arrested after they didn’t immediately leave the park. Only a handful of major Occupy encampments remain at this point, most notably in DC and San Francisco. (EDIT: Updated Occupy Philly arrest count; the protesters left the encampment peacefully but were arrested for disturbances outside of the encampment.)

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10:51 // 2 years ago