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November 20, 2011
Don’t worry about it, I’m going to spray these kids down.
Lt. John Pike (according to a pepper-sprayed protester at UC Davis) • Speaking to fellow officers before the infamous pepper-spray incident on Friday. According to the protester, who spoke at length anonymously to Boing Boing, the pepper spray he used was military grade, and it still hurts, two days later. “It’s supposed to be used at a minimum of 15 feet,” the protester told Xeni Jardin. “But he sprayed us at point blank range.” Highly recommend you read Boing Boing’s photo-heavy account of the incident, which is very informative. source (viafollow)
8:40 // 2 years ago
November 19, 2011

More on that “talking points” document we just posted

sictransitvir says: I think the ABA said earlier it was unsolicited and they rejected it. Still a valuable look behind the scenes at how this kind of operation might work.

» SFB says: You’re right, and we modified the story to reflect that … but still, the mere existence of the document is pretty fun. — Ernie @ SFB

19:18 // 2 years ago
Hey, would you look at that? The American Bankers Association’s lobbying group, Clark Lytle Geduldig & Cranford, came up with talking points against Occupy Wall Street. Fortunately, MSNBC got a hold of it. According to the memo, if Democrats campaign against big banks, “This would mean more than just short-term political discomfort for Wall Street. … It has the potential to have very long-lasting political, policy and financial impacts on the companies in the center of the bullseye.” Click here for the full document, which it’s worth noting that the ABA claims to have rejected (as it was unsolicted). EDIT: Updated with details.

Hey, would you look at that? The American Bankers Association’s lobbying group, Clark Lytle Geduldig & Cranford, came up with talking points against Occupy Wall Street. Fortunately, MSNBC got a hold of it. According to the memo, if Democrats campaign against big banks, “This would mean more than just short-term political discomfort for Wall Street. … It has the potential to have very long-lasting political, policy and financial impacts on the companies in the center of the bullseye.” Click here for the full document, which it’s worth noting that the ABA claims to have rejected (as it was unsolicted). EDIT: Updated with details.

19:03 // 2 years ago
November 18, 2011

megan-elizabeth-deactivated2012 says: Yesterday I heard someone complain about OWS costing them a "future job." This person is a college student who was planning to get a job as a police officer upon graduation. I believe he had already begun the hiring process. He claims that the police force is not hiring any new officers for a while because they can no longer afford it, thanks to the amount of overtime paid as a result of OWS. What do you think? Is this credible? Is this the fault of OWS, or a problem with the NYPD?

» SFB says: The protests are certainly a factor, at least in NYC. From this Reuters article: "About $226 million in police overtime was added for this year, and $240 million more a year after that, Turetsky said. The Police Department will have a hiring freeze for civilians; the Fire Department will cut 44 civilian jobs through attrition this year and 29 people next year." While there have been other reasons — the year’s heavy snow and weather issues are also cited — the extra police presence at Occupy is part of the reason the city went $1 billion over its budget this year. As to who to blame, let’s face it: That comes down to your political views. Many find ways to credit or discredit the movement as they see fit. Plenty would be quick to put the blame with Bloomberg; others would certainly look at the Occupy movement. Ultimately, though, it’s been a difficult year all around for NYC’s budget, with many unforeseen circumstances coming out of nowhere, and Occupy was one factor of many. — Ernie @ SFB (It’s our Office HoursShoot us a question over here.)

17:23 // 2 years ago
November 17, 2011
The protesters came up to me right away and asked if I needed any medical assistance. They were actually very kind and helpful. It was the police officers who were very aggressive.
Daily Caller reporter Michelle Fields • Discussing how protesters treated her after she and videographer Direna Cousins were struck by NYPD officers earlier today. “Direna had a camera in her hand and I had a microphone, and we were being hit,” she said. “When I fell to the ground I said at one point, ‘I’m just covering this! I’m covering this!’  And the officer just said, ‘Come on, get up, get up,’ before pulling me up by my jacket.’” As ThinkProgress notes, The Daily Caller’s Occupy coverage has been negative, but protesters helped them anyway.  source (viafollow)
21:53 // 2 years ago

Breakdown: Arrests today during Occupy “Day of Action” protests

  • 400 estimated arrests in “Day of Action” protests nationwide
  • 300 estimated arrests in New York City alone, where emotions run high
  • 99 estimated arrests at the Brooklyn Bridge, a symbolic place source
21:09 // 2 years ago

Day of Action: Protesters arrested for sitting at base of Brooklyn Bridge

  • 80+ arrested at Brooklyn Bridge during today’s protests source

» The second notable set of Brooklyn Bridge arrests: In something of a return to its roots for the Occupy movement, a number of protesters got arrested while attempting to head towards the Brooklyn Bridge, which mimics a protest from during the early part of the Occupy movement, in which over 700 people got arrested by the NYPD for walking on the iconic bridge. But the tone during today’s “Day of Action” protests was different — those who got arrested did so for sitting at the base of the bridge, while many others stuck to the pedestrian path, staying off the road.

Read ShortFormBlogFollow

18:51 // 2 years ago
newsweek:

A bloodied protester at Zuccotti Park. More here, which alleges this punishment was for knocking off an officer’s hat (including a shot of cops taking off his pants?!).
[Photo by Chang W. Lee/The New York Times]

Jesus. Was that necessary?

newsweek:

A bloodied protester at Zuccotti Park. More here, which alleges this punishment was for knocking off an officer’s hat (including a shot of cops taking off his pants?!).

[Photo by Chang W. Lee/The New York Times]

Jesus. Was that necessary?

(via thedailyfeed)

15:44 // 2 years ago
peterfeld:

rachelfershleiser:

Police captain Ray Lewis from Phily protesting w #OccupyWallStreet
(via Twitpic)

that’s an amazing image.

Yeah, that is an iconic image there.

peterfeld:

rachelfershleiser:

Police captain Ray Lewis from Phily protesting w #OccupyWallStreet

(via Twitpic)

that’s an amazing image.

Yeah, that is an iconic image there.

11:28 // 2 years ago
think-progress:

Two Wall Streeters apparently forgot their jobs were saved by taxpayers, like many of these protesters.
H/T Justin Elliot

You’d think they would have money for better signs. These guys can afford buying the expensive stuff from Kinko’s, or whatever FedEx calls that place these days.

think-progress:

Two Wall Streeters apparently forgot their jobs were saved by taxpayers, like many of these protesters.

H/T Justin Elliot

You’d think they would have money for better signs. These guys can afford buying the expensive stuff from Kinko’s, or whatever FedEx calls that place these days.

(via think4yourself)

11:14 // 2 years ago