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June 16, 2011
Fukushima: Worse than was initially reported?
Is Fukushima worse than we think? That’s what this story from Al Jazeera suggests. One example they offer up: When seawater gets poured on the still-hot reactors, it produces radioactive steam that’s blown everywhere — even as far as the west coast of the U.S. One former nuclear industry executive, Arnold Gundersen, even put it as such: “Fukushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind.” Is he right? Worth a read. (Photo via Flickr user Jun Teramoto) source
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Is Fukushima worse than we think? That’s what this story from Al Jazeera suggests. One example they offer up: When seawater gets poured on the still-hot reactors, it produces radioactive steam that’s blown everywhere — even as far as the west coast of the U.S. One former nuclear industry executive, Arnold Gundersen, even put it as such: “Fukushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind.” Is he right? Worth a read. (Photo via Flickr user Jun Teramoto) source

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13:29 // 3 years ago
May 16, 2011

Despite massive damage, Fukushima timetable stays the same

  • 9 months maximum needed to get Fukushima under control source

» That number isn’t changing: While they’ve discovered more damage than they originally anticipated — such as damage to fuel reactors — and are still dealing with meltdowns. Despite these discouraging discoveries, officials are sticking to this timetable, saying that the reactors are continuing to cool despite the more extensive damage. ”The point [Japanese Prime Minister Naoto] Kan is making is that the reactor cores are being cooled down despite the apparent meltdown,” said Goshi Hosono, the prime minister’s special adviser on the issue.

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14:41 // 3 years ago
April 9, 2011
newsflick:

Too Close to Fukushima: Inside the Exclusion Zone, a cat is left behind inside a house. (Time)

Well, that’s the most depressing thing we’ve seen today.

newsflick:

Too Close to Fukushima: Inside the Exclusion Zone, a cat is left behind inside a house. (Time)

Well, that’s the most depressing thing we’ve seen today.

11:09 // 3 years ago
March 15, 2011
10:38 // 3 years ago
March 14, 2011
If all workers do in fact leave the plant, the nuclear fuel in all three reactors is likely to melt down, which would lead to wholesale releases of radioactive material — by far the largest accident of its kind since the Chernobyl disaster 25 years ago.
The New York Times • In this article about the possibility of Fukushima workers leaving the plant. Scary, yes, but we refer you to this link we posted earlier. It could be bad, but it won’t be kill-us-all bad.
22:26 // 3 years ago