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February 11, 2013
In a Sept. 15, 2012, story about Notre Dame’s college football victory over Michigan State that highlighted linebacker Manti Te’o’s performance, The Associated Press erroneously reported that he played in the game a few days after the death of his girlfriend, who had a long battle with leukemia. Other AP stories through Jan. 3, 2013, also contained references to the girlfriend’s death, including some directly quoting Te’o and his father, Brian Te’o, about how he played through personal grief. On Jan. 16, Notre Dame officials and Manti Te’o said there was never a girlfriend or a death, and that Te’o was victimized in a hoax. Others have since come forward to say Te’o was duped in a series of phone calls and online messages purporting to be from a girl he never met in person.
The blanket correction the Associated Press is putting on all stories regarding Manti Te’o’s dead girlfriend, a story which was later proven to be falsified.
7:59 // 1 year ago
January 8, 2013
18:55 // 1 year ago
December 18, 2011
Unexpected sequel of the day: Rudy Ruettiger, the Notre Dame football walk-on and inspiration for the Sean Astin movie “Rudy,” just had to settle with the Securities and Exchange Commission — getting fined $382,000 for turning his Gatorade challenger “Rudy” into a penny stock pump-and-dump scheme that drew $11 million in illicit profits, hundreds of thousands of which went to the feel-good icon. In the end, the hardworking runt sold more stocks than he did beverages. “Investors were lured into the scheme by Mr. Ruettiger’s well-known, feel-good story but found themselves in a situation that did not have a happy ending,” said the sound-bite-ready Scott W. Friestad of the SEC’s enforcement division. That feel-good story doesn’t feel so good anymore now, does it?

Unexpected sequel of the day: Rudy Ruettiger, the Notre Dame football walk-on and inspiration for the Sean Astin movie “Rudy,” just had to settle with the Securities and Exchange Commission — getting fined $382,000 for turning his Gatorade challenger “Rudy” into a penny stock pump-and-dump scheme that drew $11 million in illicit profits, hundreds of thousands of which went to the feel-good icon. In the end, the hardworking runt sold more stocks than he did beverages. “Investors were lured into the scheme by Mr. Ruettiger’s well-known, feel-good story but found themselves in a situation that did not have a happy ending,” said the sound-bite-ready Scott W. Friestad of the SEC’s enforcement division. That feel-good story doesn’t feel so good anymore now, does it?

12:21 // 2 years ago