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March 2, 2013
fastcompany:

North Korea’s Concentration Camps Are Growing
Does Dennis Rodman even have a clue?
A new publication by the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea shows the growth of concentration camps inside the country. Anything between 150,000 and 200,000 citizens (that last figure comes courtesy of Amnesty, via are thought to be detained in one of at least six of the DPRK’s internment facilities. In all but one, inhabitants are there for life.
The report contains recent satellite images of one such institution in the North-East of the country, known as Camp 25. The pictures show that the area of the internment center, which increased in size by 72% between 2009 and 2010, is still growing. Guards, sentry posts and what are thought to be a crematory and gallows are all visible, helpfully pointed out here by the Washington Post.
Find out more here.
[Image via The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea]

Seemed relevant to highlight, as we touched on this earlier this morning in the context of “The Worm’s” trip to North Korea. That the government operates full-scale concentration camps is an aspect of the state that sometimes seems downplayed or overlooked, somehow; you can watch an escapee of one such camp, Shin Dong-hyuk, describe his experiences here. But be warned — his story is extremely horrible, and somewhat graphic.

fastcompany:

North Korea’s Concentration Camps Are Growing

Does Dennis Rodman even have a clue?

A new publication by the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea shows the growth of concentration camps inside the country. Anything between 150,000 and 200,000 citizens (that last figure comes courtesy of Amnesty, via are thought to be detained in one of at least six of the DPRK’s internment facilities. In all but one, inhabitants are there for life.

The report contains recent satellite images of one such institution in the North-East of the country, known as Camp 25. The pictures show that the area of the internment center, which increased in size by 72% between 2009 and 2010, is still growing. Guards, sentry posts and what are thought to be a crematory and gallows are all visible, helpfully pointed out here by the Washington Post.

Find out more here.

[Image via The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea]

Seemed relevant to highlight, as we touched on this earlier this morning in the context of “The Worm’s” trip to North Korea. That the government operates full-scale concentration camps is an aspect of the state that sometimes seems downplayed or overlooked, somehow; you can watch an escapee of one such camp, Shin Dong-hyuk, describe his experiences here. But be warned — his story is extremely horrible, and somewhat graphic.

18:50 // 1 year ago

latimes:

It’s still hard to believe this happened: But Dennis Rodman visited North Korea this week, vowing his eternal friendship with the country’s dictator Kim Jong-Un.

In case you missed it, Rodman was brought along as party of a VICE documentary on basketball diplomacy, and spoke at length with Jong-Un, who is reportedly a massive basketball fan.

Follow the entire bizarre series of events here.

Photos: AFP / KCNA, Associated Press /Kyodo News

One wonders to what extent Rodman is aware of the state of affairs for non-basketball celebrities in North Korea, which have by all accounts persisted since the transition to the rule of Kim Jong-un — North Korea, of course, boasts what is thought to be the world’s largest network of active concentration camps, to say nothing of the myriad opressions the general populace labors under. This is not to say Rodman is assuredly ignorant of the nature of the North Korean government, nor that expressions of gratitude and respect couldn’t be valuable from a diplomatic perspective. But if you’re claiming a “friend for life,” in earnest, who’s propping up his economy with forced labor? Kind of a hard sell.

14:29 // 1 year ago
February 26, 2013

sbnation:

Dennis Rodman is in North Korea for “sports diplomacy,” a trip that actually garnered a “no comment” from the State Department. Fantastic. 

Dennis Rodman’s contribution to diplomacy: Teach Kim Jong-Un how to rebound.

(via sportsnetny)

18:25 // 1 year ago
February 12, 2013

A day after North Korea test, Obama expected to pitch for cut in nuclear arms

  • 1,700 the number of nuclear arms that the U.S. currently has deployed. The president, in his upcoming State of the Union address, is expected to call for a cut in this number to as low as 1,000. Last night’s test of a nuclear weapon by North Korea makes the timing on this a little more sensitive than it was a couple of days ago. source
10:04 // 1 year ago
February 11, 2013

DEVELOPING: North Korea nuclear test suspected

breakingnews:

North Korea is suspected of its third nuclear test after a seismic event was detected near the site of the regime’s previous tests. A UN Security Council diplomat has anonymously told Reuters that the event was in fact a test.

Read more about the event from CNN.

Follow updates on BreakingNews.com.

From the CNN report: “‘It’s a nuclear test,’ said Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. ‘That magnitude and that location — it’s awfully unlikely it’s anything else.’”

(via rubenfeld)

23:43 // 1 year ago
January 29, 2013
discoverynews:

Google Maps North Korea
Details of cities and even prison camps in North Korea became more visible on Tuesday when Google updated its Google Maps application to include information citizen cartographers have been providing it about the country through a crowdsourcing development program called Map Maker. Read more…

Good work, Google. The more this info is out there, the more people will pay attention to this issue.

discoverynews:

Google Maps North Korea

Details of cities and even prison camps in North Korea became more visible on Tuesday when Google updated its Google Maps application to include information citizen cartographers have been providing it about the country through a crowdsourcing development program called Map Maker. Read more…

Good work, Google. The more this info is out there, the more people will pay attention to this issue.

11:30 // 1 year ago
January 20, 2013
What’s so odd about the whole thing is that no one in North Korea can even hope to afford the things they showed us. And it’s not like they’re going to export this technology. They’re building products for a market that doesn’t exist.
Sophie Schmidt, daughter of Google chairman Eric Schmidt • Discussing her experience at the North Korean version of the Consumer Electronics Show earlier this month. Schmidt went with her father to the country — both of whom were joined by former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson. The longtime Google figure spent much of his time in the nation trying to convince North Korean leaders that their focus on keeping internet access extremely limited was causing long-term harm to the country’s economy, an argument which we wouldn’t be surprised if it fell on deaf ears.
19:01 // 1 year ago
January 9, 2013
12:14 // 1 year ago
December 11, 2012
breakingnews:

North Korea launches long-range rocket
AP:North Korea fired a long-range rocket on Wednesday in its 2nd launch under new leader Kim Jong Un.
Japan says debris from the rocket fell in the waters off Japan, the Philippines and the Korean peninsula.
Photo: A soldier stands guard in front of a rocket sitting on a launch pad at the West Sea Satellite Launch Site, during a guided media tour by North Korean authorities in the northwest of Pyongyang in this April 8, 2012 file photo. (Reuters file)

After April’s failed rocket test, this is a critical show of strength for Kim Jong-un’s regime — if it turns out that the rocket successfully launched a satellite into orbit, the implications for North Korea’s nuclear program would make their standing as a geopolitical power increase significantly.

breakingnews:

North Korea launches long-range rocket

AP:North Korea fired a long-range rocket on Wednesday in its 2nd launch under new leader Kim Jong Un.

Japan says debris from the rocket fell in the waters off Japan, the Philippines and the Korean peninsula.

Photo: A soldier stands guard in front of a rocket sitting on a launch pad at the West Sea Satellite Launch Site, during a guided media tour by North Korean authorities in the northwest of Pyongyang in this April 8, 2012 file photo. (Reuters file)

After April’s failed rocket test, this is a critical show of strength for Kim Jong-un’s regime — if it turns out that the rocket successfully launched a satellite into orbit, the implications for North Korea’s nuclear program would make their standing as a geopolitical power increase significantly.

21:35 // 1 year ago
July 26, 2012
Best way to derail an Olympic soccer match: Accidentally use the South Korean flag for a game featuring the North Korean team. Oops. The North Korean women’s team protested the scene, one hour wasted. Suddenly, the match is a diplomatic failure, even though the North Koreans won. (AP photo)

Best way to derail an Olympic soccer match: Accidentally use the South Korean flag for a game featuring the North Korean team. Oops. The North Korean women’s team protested the scene, one hour wasted. Suddenly, the match is a diplomatic failure, even though the North Koreans won. (AP photo)

6:55 // 2 years ago