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April 2, 2013
The bottom line is simply that what Kim Jong Un is choosing to do is provocative. It is dangerous, reckless. The United States will not accept the DPRK (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) as a nuclear state. …the United States will do what is necessary to defend ourselves and defend our allies, Korea and Japan. We are fully prepared and capable of doing so, and I think the DPRK understands that.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry • Speaking sternly on a North Korean declaration to reopen its primary nuclear reactor complex in Yongbyon. North Korean state media reported that the reactors, as well as a uranium enrichment facility, were shut down and disabled as part of a 2007 agreement with the United States, which the government now plans to “readjust and restart.” This is not the first indication of a renewed international belligerence on the part of North Korea and its hereditary leader, Kim Jong-un — they also declared last week that they were entering a “state of war” with neighboring South Korea. source
19:14 // 1 year ago
March 30, 2013
Austin has a lot of international cache. It’s seen as a center of music, as a center of exciting technology, and they want to show they can threaten that. They want to show that they can do something to get attention.
Jeremi Suri, Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs at the University of Texas • Offering up one explanation as to why, on a map apparently displaying North Korean military targets photographed and released by their government, the city of Austin, Texas, most recently home of SXSW, appears marked for rocket attack. Suri also cited the location of South Korean company Samsung in the Texas city as a possible factor. Austin resident Jeff Miller had a simpler, tongue-in-cheek explanation: “He’s going to wreck a couple of musical festivals, I guess.” source
19:08 // 1 year ago
We’ve seen reports of a new and unconstructive statement from North Korea. We take these threats seriously and remain in close contact with our South Korean allies. But we would also note that North Korea has a long history of bellicose rhetoric and threats and today’s announcement follows that familiar pattern.
Caitlin Hayden, spokesperson for the National Security Council • Speaking on the vocal threats by the North Korean state of impending military action, be it against the United States (they recently released a video showing a fantasy invasion/overthrow of the U.S. mainland), or South Korea (they’ve also announced a “state of war” against their southern neighbors). The response from the U.S. is instructive in the difficulty of assessing North Korean threats — at the same time as all such proclamations must be taken with a requisite level of seriousness, their state has long made militaristic threats boisterously, and uneventfully. source
16:22 // 1 year ago
March 29, 2013
nbcnews:

‘Time has come’: North Korea readies rockets
(Photo: Jon Chol Jin / AP)
Isolated and impoverished nation is “not a paper tiger” and its repeated attack threats should not be dismissed as mere bluster, a U.S. official warns.
Read the complete story.


So yeah, this sounds promising.

nbcnews:

‘Time has come’: North Korea readies rockets

(Photo: Jon Chol Jin / AP)

Isolated and impoverished nation is “not a paper tiger” and its repeated attack threats should not be dismissed as mere bluster, a U.S. official warns.

Read the complete story.

So yeah, this sounds promising.

10:35 // 1 year ago
March 27, 2013
14:42 // 1 year ago
March 12, 2013
19:50 // 1 year ago
March 11, 2013
I don’t condone what he does, but he’s my friend.
Former NBA superstar Dennis Rodman • Discussing his plans to visit North Korea again in August to vacation with Kim Jong-un. Rodman made the comments to what clearly is the most prominent media outlet in the country, Fargo, North Dakota’s KXJB. Rodman was reportedly giddy throughout the interview. Remember when the weirdest thing this guy did was color his hair purple?
22:01 // 1 year ago
March 4, 2013
13:31 // 1 year ago
March 3, 2013
He said, ‘If you can Dennis, I don’t want to do war, I don’t want to do war.’ He said that to me.
Dennis Rodman, playing diplomat between North Korea and the United States on ABC’s “This Week.” The Worm suggested that common ground could be met on the basketball court. ”He loves basketball,” Rodman said, referring to Kim Jong-un. “I said, ‘Obama loves basketball.’ Lets start there.”
13:52 // 1 year ago
March 2, 2013
fastcompany:

North Korea’s Concentration Camps Are Growing
Does Dennis Rodman even have a clue?
A new publication by the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea shows the growth of concentration camps inside the country. Anything between 150,000 and 200,000 citizens (that last figure comes courtesy of Amnesty, via are thought to be detained in one of at least six of the DPRK’s internment facilities. In all but one, inhabitants are there for life.
The report contains recent satellite images of one such institution in the North-East of the country, known as Camp 25. The pictures show that the area of the internment center, which increased in size by 72% between 2009 and 2010, is still growing. Guards, sentry posts and what are thought to be a crematory and gallows are all visible, helpfully pointed out here by the Washington Post.
Find out more here.
[Image via The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea]

Seemed relevant to highlight, as we touched on this earlier this morning in the context of “The Worm’s” trip to North Korea. That the government operates full-scale concentration camps is an aspect of the state that sometimes seems downplayed or overlooked, somehow; you can watch an escapee of one such camp, Shin Dong-hyuk, describe his experiences here. But be warned — his story is extremely horrible, and somewhat graphic.

fastcompany:

North Korea’s Concentration Camps Are Growing

Does Dennis Rodman even have a clue?

A new publication by the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea shows the growth of concentration camps inside the country. Anything between 150,000 and 200,000 citizens (that last figure comes courtesy of Amnesty, via are thought to be detained in one of at least six of the DPRK’s internment facilities. In all but one, inhabitants are there for life.

The report contains recent satellite images of one such institution in the North-East of the country, known as Camp 25. The pictures show that the area of the internment center, which increased in size by 72% between 2009 and 2010, is still growing. Guards, sentry posts and what are thought to be a crematory and gallows are all visible, helpfully pointed out here by the Washington Post.

Find out more here.

[Image via The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea]

Seemed relevant to highlight, as we touched on this earlier this morning in the context of “The Worm’s” trip to North Korea. That the government operates full-scale concentration camps is an aspect of the state that sometimes seems downplayed or overlooked, somehow; you can watch an escapee of one such camp, Shin Dong-hyuk, describe his experiences here. But be warned — his story is extremely horrible, and somewhat graphic.

18:50 // 1 year ago