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December 3, 2013

Stuff you may have missed: December 3, 2013

Detroit can go ahead with the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history ($18 billion in debt, for those playing at home), which is bad news for retired city workers, who now find their pensions facing a sudden threat.

Earlier this year, a Nigerian man spent three days trapped at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, surviving thanks to an air bubble on his sunken ship. He thinks the rescue was divine deliverance.

Kim Jong-Un apparently fired his uncle, who was a powerful deal-broker in the country. Couldn’t negotiate that one, it seems.

Good news for Obama’s Kenya-born uncle: He won’t be forced out of the U.S., after a judge threw out a deportation notice.

Two companies that nobody likes can officially get married.

19:38 // 4 months ago
September 3, 2013

the60sproject says: I think your Nokia post—particularly the theverge re-blog part—ignores the real thrust of this story as it focuses on the end of the "Nokia smartphone." While the company is certainly an iconic name in the mobile universe, Nokia's problems stem from the fact that it (like RIM) never really evolved into the smartphone era. In fact, almost all the phones shown in your post are simple old-style cellphones, not smartphones. How the un-innovative Microsoft will get a win from this is beyond me.

» SFB says: One thing worth keeping in mind is that a “smartphone” in 2001 isn’t the same as a smartphone in 2013. For one thing, I don’t think RIM BlackBerry was anything other than a smartphone company. Meanwhile, Nokia’s use of Symbian software, while hopelessly outdated now, was foundational in building out the space worldwide—they got the fundamentals down so everyone else could focus on next steps. Even if the company itself merely created the template that other companies followed, they proved it could happen. I think that both companies failed to adapt to the touchscreen era, but the fact that we equate touchscreen with smartphone these days only proves how far iconic companies like RIM BlackBerry and Nokia have fallen behind.

But that said, in regards to your point on Microsoft, check out what Farhad Manjoo wrote today—he suggests the move is an implicit admission that the OEM model doesn’t work for the company anymore. That’s a big deal. — Ernie @ SFB

20:01 // 7 months ago

thisistheverge:

There will never be another Nokia smartphone

The Nokia brand name, one of the most storied marks in mobile, will never grace another smartphone. Let’s take a moment by gazing at some of Nokia’s wildest smartphone designs.

Nokia also played a key role in creating the network on which the first GSM call was made. In fact, they helped develop the technology.

10:08 // 7 months ago
September 2, 2013
23:35 // 7 months ago
January 30, 2013
Nokia usually isn’t in a place to talk when it comes to mobile competition — unless the target of its mockery is BlackBerry.

Nokia usually isn’t in a place to talk when it comes to mobile competitionunless the target of its mockery is BlackBerry.

18:38 // 1 year ago
October 4, 2012
11:01 // 1 year ago
June 14, 2012

Life at Nokia: Massive layoffs, executive shuffling, lower Q2 profit forecasts

  • execs Nokia Chief Marketing Officer Jerri DeVard, Executive Vice President of Mobile Phones Mary McDowell, and EVP of Markets Niklas Savander will all be shown the door, effective June 30.
  • layoffs The company will layoff approximately 10,000 employees, primarily as a result of plant closures in Canada and Germany, as well as cutbacks to the company’s Devices & Services division.
  • profits Nokia also announced that the layoffs and executive shuffling would mean lower Q2 profits than anticipated. Expected restructuring costs of €1 billion for Q2 tripled to €3 billion. source

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14:16 // 1 year ago
February 14, 2011

Why is everyone skeptical of Nokia’s Microsoft deal, anyway?

  • reason The company’s newest CEO, Stephen Elop, was an executive at Microsoft before becoming Nokia’s figurehead – and he just spearheaded the Microsoft deal.
  • evidence The new president of U.S.-focused Nokia, Inc. is Chris Weber, who spent 16 years at Microsoft. Gaining competitive advantage by trojan horse much? source

» Here comes the denial: While many are suspicious of Elop’s motives, he personally denies that’s what took place. ”The obvious answer is no,” Elop said. “We made sure that the entire management team was involved in the process, and of course the board of directors of Nokia are the only ones that can make this significant of a decision about Nokia. They made that final decision on Thursday night.” For some reason, we’re guessing he had that response ready.

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10:53 // 3 years ago
February 13, 2011

Three reasons why Microsoft’s Nokia deal really sucks for Nokia

  • one Their long-popular Symbian OS was created mostly as a reaction to Microsoft’s plans to enter the mobile market over a decade ago. This move tastes like crow.
  • two The profit margins on Nokia phones right now are roughly 30 percent. With a Windows-licensed phone, it’s much closer to 5-10 percent – a huge drop in revenues.
  • three This is the worst one by far – 20,000 Finnish Nokia employees will likely lose their jobs due to redundancy – a HUGE chunk of people by any stretch. source
11:50 // 3 years ago
February 11, 2011
Nokia, Microsoft forced to fight for smartphone scraps together
This photo, showing Microsoft and Nokia’s CEOs, basically explains the entire story on its own. Nokia’s Stephen Elop: Down with whatever random OS we were trying to make that won’t succeed on the market because we waited too long! Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer: Up with our in-just-before-the-wire Windows Phone 7! By the way, how sad is it that Nokia, which basically wrote the script on the modern cell phone, now has to hop in bed with Microsoft to even keep up? source
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This photo, showing Microsoft and Nokia’s CEOs, basically explains the entire story on its own. Nokia’s Stephen Elop: Down with whatever random OS we were trying to make that won’t succeed on the market because we waited too long! Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer: Up with our in-just-before-the-wire Windows Phone 7! By the way, how sad is it that Nokia, which basically wrote the script on the modern cell phone, now has to hop in bed with Microsoft to even keep up? source

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21:59 // 3 years ago