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June 22, 2012
18:51 // 2 years ago
June 3, 2012
Anthony Bourdain tends to get noticed. The chef turned televised tour guide is macho but not overbearing, profane without being coarse, and tall and handsome. How handsome? I was at an outdoor social event with my wife some years ago when he passed by, and she was so transfixed by him that she walked into a bush. I hate him for that, but am unsurprised that his charmed life is about to add a new chapter.
The NYT’s David Carr • Writing about how Anthony Bourdain is all dreamy and stuff. Oh, and his new gig with CNN.
21:53 // 2 years ago
June 1, 2012
1:18 // 2 years ago
May 27, 2012

New York Times’ CEO ouster: A partly-platonic love triangle, or more?

  • partner Janet Robinson, the CEO of the New York Times Company who pushed the company towards its current paywall system, had a strong professional relationship with the company’s chairman, Arthur Sulzberger Jr.; the duo, which New York Magazine says was “once an executive version of a married couple,” was known for finishing one another sentences.
  • girlfriend But a funny thing happened on the way to professional bliss — Sulzberger, divorced in 2008, got a girlfriend. Claudia Gonzalez, a Mexican marketing exec, took more and more of Sulzberger’s time away from Robinson and may have given advice which led to Robinson’s ousting in December. But is that merely one symptom of a larger falling-out? source

» A corporate whodunit: Months after a high-profile ouster, New York Magazine takes a look back at the circumstances that led to Robinson’s departure. Who was the person who actually pulled the knife? Was it Gonzalez? Did Sulzberger do it himself, or was it his ambitious cousin Michael Golden, who fought with Robinson over the potential sale of the Boston Globe? And what role did digital exec Martin Nisenholtz, who fought a losing battle against Robinson over paywalls, play? And let’s be honest: For all we know, did the butler do it?

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13:06 // 2 years ago
May 22, 2012
A critic’s notebook article on Monday about the prevalence of standing ovations at Broadway shows described incorrectly the quickness with which audience members appeared to be on their feet at a performance of the current revival of “Death of a Salesman.” Their ovation seemed to occur within a millisecond — one-thousandth of a second — not a megasecond, which is one million seconds.
The New York Times • Writing a correction in a piece on standing ovations. Excuse us why we stand up and applaud this one for a megasecond. (ht Hypervocal)
10:07 // 2 years ago
May 17, 2012
Here’s the Republican anti-Obama playbook, everybody
A Republican political branding group, Strategic Perception Inc., is working on releasing a ton of anti-Obama salvo in September or so in the form of a film titled “Next,” in an effort to make the president look as bad as humanly possible — bringing up such good memories as Jeremiah Wright and the one time that he shook hands with the Russian president. (The voiceover they want to use? Jon Voight.) But Republican ad strategist Fred Davis, working with TD Ameritrade founder Joe Ricketts, didn’t count on one thing: The New York Times got a hold of it first. Read the whole document describing the ad. It’s comedic.

Here’s the Republican anti-Obama playbook, everybody

A Republican political branding group, Strategic Perception Inc., is working on releasing a ton of anti-Obama salvo in September or so in the form of a film titled “Next,” in an effort to make the president look as bad as humanly possible — bringing up such good memories as Jeremiah Wright and the one time that he shook hands with the Russian president. (The voiceover they want to use? Jon Voight.) But Republican ad strategist Fred Davis, working with TD Ameritrade founder Joe Ricketts, didn’t count on one thing: The New York Times got a hold of it first. Read the whole document describing the ad. It’s comedic.

10:23 // 2 years ago
May 10, 2012
An obituary on Wednesday about the violinist Roman Totenberg repeated an error from a 1935 Times report on a concert in Washington at which Mr. Totenberg made his United States debut. He performed Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D Major — not in D Minor. (There is no such Beethoven violin concerto.) And the obituary misstated the surname of the pianist in the Alma Trio, which also included Mr. Totenberg and the cellist Gabor Rejto. He was Adolph Baller, not Bailer.
In which the New York Times corrects a 77-year-old error. (ht Poynter)
11:12 // 2 years ago
May 2, 2012

vinegarwilliams:

think-progress:

Front pages: 5/2/03 vs. 5/2/11

HT @nytjim

It’s almost funny, how sad it all is.

In other words: Bush declared a major victory, while Obama scored one.

0:48 // 2 years ago
April 19, 2012
10:26 // 2 years ago
April 14, 2012
Here’s a window into a tragedy within the American military: For every soldier killed on the battlefield this year, about 25 veterans are dying by their own hands.
New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof • In an opinion piece on the death of soldiers after they return home. A few other key stats — more former soldiers have committed suicide after returning home than died in combat in Afghanistan and Iraq combined, being a veteran doubles the risk of suicide, and being a veteran between ages 17 and 24 quadruples the risk. Yikes. Read up on this disturbing trend.
21:44 // 2 years ago