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November 22, 2012
9:20 // 1 year ago
November 19, 2012
shortformblog:

Currently on the NYT front page: This massive ad arguing from a National Parks association arguing for action on the Fiscal Cliff. This took up way more than half of the front page.

Follow-up to this: Apparently, this was the first time the New York Times had ever run an ad this big on its Web site. Being intrigued by the idea, I got in touch with the National Parks Conservation Association and the New York Times for my main gig at work to ask them why they chose to do this ad. “As part of our ongoing funding campaign, we saw an opportunity to engage the American public surrounding the threat of the fiscal cliff facing our country,” the group’s vice president of communications, Linda Rancourt, said. As far as the New York Times, they said that the ad was their effort to translate the popular “open letter” advocacy ad concept to the Web. Fascinating stuff. — Ernie @ SFB

shortformblog:

Currently on the NYT front page: This massive ad arguing from a National Parks association arguing for action on the Fiscal Cliff. This took up way more than half of the front page.

Follow-up to this: Apparently, this was the first time the New York Times had ever run an ad this big on its Web site. Being intrigued by the idea, I got in touch with the National Parks Conservation Association and the New York Times for my main gig at work to ask them why they chose to do this ad. “As part of our ongoing funding campaign, we saw an opportunity to engage the American public surrounding the threat of the fiscal cliff facing our country,” the group’s vice president of communications, Linda Rancourt, said. As far as the New York Times, they said that the ad was their effort to translate the popular “open letter” advocacy ad concept to the Web. Fascinating stuff. — Ernie @ SFB

20:07 // 1 year ago
November 18, 2012
Currently on the NYT front page: This massive ad arguing from a National Parks association arguing for action on the Fiscal Cliff. This took up way more than half of the front page.

Currently on the NYT front page: This massive ad arguing from a National Parks association arguing for action on the Fiscal Cliff. This took up way more than half of the front page.

21:13 // 1 year ago
November 7, 2012
peterfeld:

Sigh of relief! Here’s a preview of tomorrow’s NYT via buzzfeed.

Alright, now someone get the New York Post’s front.

peterfeld:

Sigh of relief! Here’s a preview of tomorrow’s NYT via buzzfeed.

Alright, now someone get the New York Post’s front.

1:31 // 1 year ago
November 6, 2012
It’s a little early to know exactly what we can learn from social media metrics. I think the way we’ll be looking at this stuff will be very different in four years, in eight years, in twelve years. For right now, we’re kind of in an awkward adolescent age … we’re out of the classical innocent era of our youth where you could just call someone on the phone. But we’re not sure what the substitute for that is yet.
With all the recent brewhaha about Nate Silver’s controversial projections for tonight’s outcome, and while we’re all waiting for some legit data to come back from the polls, it seems like a good time to revisit our exclusive interview with Mr. Silver back in September. Enjoy! (via election)

Nate Silver is hiding in a dimly-lit room with an iPad and a MacBook Air, hoping his projections are right. 

(via gov)

19:22 // 1 year ago
November 5, 2012
election:

How a genius election-related graphic came together
The other night, I posted this really amazing New York Times graphic breaking down the numerous roads to Electoral College victory Obama and Romney can take. Think the graphic was cool? Now here’s how they did it. In the words of the Times’ very own Mike Bostock:

The hard part of this graphic, implementation-wise, is the animated transition as you flip states. Although this is superficially similar to collapsible interactive trees I had implemented previously, it turned out to be more challenging due to the pruning below decision nodes. To assist my thinking, I sketched out a sample tree with eight different interactions and the corresponding animations. With examples, it was possible to generalize the behavior of the transitions and start the implementation.

Which road do you think the Electoral College is going to take?
— Ernie @ ShortFormBlog

Infographic creators aspire to create something this awesome. And here it is.

election:

How a genius election-related graphic came together

The other night, I posted this really amazing New York Times graphic breaking down the numerous roads to Electoral College victory Obama and Romney can take. Think the graphic was cool? Now here’s how they did it. In the words of the Times’ very own Mike Bostock:

The hard part of this graphic, implementation-wise, is the animated transition as you flip states. Although this is superficially similar to collapsible interactive trees I had implemented previously, it turned out to be more challenging due to the pruning below decision nodes. To assist my thinking, I sketched out a sample tree with eight different interactions and the corresponding animations. With examples, it was possible to generalize the behavior of the transitions and start the implementation.

Which road do you think the Electoral College is going to take?

— Ernie @ ShortFormBlog

Infographic creators aspire to create something this awesome. And here it is.

(via gov)

19:20 // 1 year ago
October 28, 2012
Just an update to our post from earlier: The New York Times has created a Google Maps mashup explaining the zone system being used in NYC. As this isn’t going to be as useful if the power goes out, we’re going to leave up the original PDF, which includes locations of shelters and precautions you should take, for purposes of printing out. But this should help. (thanks waterman12053 for the find)

Just an update to our post from earlier: The New York Times has created a Google Maps mashup explaining the zone system being used in NYC. As this isn’t going to be as useful if the power goes out, we’re going to leave up the original PDF, which includes locations of shelters and precautions you should take, for purposes of printing out. But this should help. (thanks waterman12053 for the find)

16:31 // 1 year ago
October 27, 2012
demnewswire:

The New York Times Endorsement: Barack Obama For Re-Election 
“…we enthusiastically endorse President Barack Obama for a second term, and express the hope that his victory will be accompanied by a new Congress willing to work for policies that Americans need.”


Not exactly the shock of the century, but America’s “paper of record” has once again endorsed Barack Obama for President. The last time the NYT endorsed a Republican? They liked Ike, all the way back in 1956.

demnewswire:

The New York Times Endorsement: Barack Obama For Re-Election 

“…we enthusiastically endorse President Barack Obama for a second term, and express the hope that his victory will be accompanied by a new Congress willing to work for policies that Americans need.”

Not exactly the shock of the century, but America’s “paper of record” has once again endorsed Barack Obama for President. The last time the NYT endorsed a Republican? They liked Ike, all the way back in 1956.

(via sarahlee310)

21:38 // 1 year ago
October 7, 2012
Smart read of the morning: Author Kevin Baker, writing for The New York Times, makes a broad claim that the GOP’s biggest problem is that they’re trying to build their base without the city, despite their growing influence on American culture. “In short,” he writes, “they promise to rip and tear at the immensely complex fabric of city life while sneering at the entire ‘urban vision of dense housing and government transit.’ There is a terrible arrogance here that has ramifications well beyond the Republicans’ electoral prospects.” Now, whether you agree with that sentiment, this article is nonetheless a pretty great read, backed up by decades of historic context (the image above harkening back to “Ford to City: Drop Dead”). Great food for thought.

Smart read of the morning: Author Kevin Baker, writing for The New York Times, makes a broad claim that the GOP’s biggest problem is that they’re trying to build their base without the city, despite their growing influence on American culture. “In short,” he writes, “they promise to rip and tear at the immensely complex fabric of city life while sneering at the entire ‘urban vision of dense housing and government transit.’ There is a terrible arrogance here that has ramifications well beyond the Republicans’ electoral prospects.” Now, whether you agree with that sentiment, this article is nonetheless a pretty great read, backed up by decades of historic context (the image above harkening back to “Ford to City: Drop Dead”). Great food for thought.

9:58 // 1 year ago
October 3, 2012
A note to Neil Genzlinger: Your Critic’s Notebook column about the overuse of the term “Really?” was so deeply vacuous that I couldn’t help but feel that you have stepped into my area of expertise.
Jerry Seinfeld is really, really p.o.’d at the New York Times. (via entertainmentweekly)

Good thing he didn’t criticize “The Marriage Ref.”
12:24 // 1 year ago