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October 1, 2014
The Internet is not broken, and does not need to be fixed. Left-wing extremists have been crying wolf for the past decade about the harm to the Internet if the federal government didn’t regulate it. Not only were they wrong, but the Internet has exploded with innovation. Do not regulate the Internet. The best way to keep it open and free is what has kept it open and free all along—no government intervention.

There’s an organization out there called American Commitment that is preying on stupid people who see things through Amurikkah-tinted glasses by reframing the debate on net neutrality into a “government takeover” of the internet. If you are one of the 2.4 million people who signed this petition, you are among the 2.4 million stupidest people in the country. Just thought I should tell you so you can learn to embrace your stupidity and realize that you’re letting some jackasses paid for by the Koch family feed your brain with mind-numbing bullshit.

May you see the error of your ways and spend a couple of minutes researching the jerks that are brainwashing you. Thanks. — Ernie @ SFB

15:10 // 2 weeks ago
April 27, 2014
13:01 // 5 months ago
April 24, 2014
17:05 // 5 months ago
April 23, 2014
19:57 // 6 months ago
February 19, 2014
Preserving the Internet as an open platform for innovation and expression while providing certainty and predictability in the marketplace is an important responsibility of this agency.
FCC chairman Tom Wheeler • In a new statement, confirming that the Federal Communications Commission will take steps to implement new net neutrality rules after a federal court struck down the organization’s Open Internet Order earlier this year. Rather than attempting to reclassify internet providers, or challenging the court’s verdict, Wheeler says the FCC will rewrite the rules in a manner that would survive another judicial review. source
14:46 // 8 months ago
January 14, 2014

D.C. Court of Appeals strikes down FCC net neutrality regulations

  • 2010 The Federal Communications Commission adopted the Open Internet Order, a set of rules dictating how internet service providers could/couldn’t prioritize web traffic; fulfilling a campaign promise from President Obama to continue protecting net neutrality during his time in office.
  • 2014 A federal judge in Washington D.C. struck down the rules adopted under the Open Internet order, saying that the FCC over-stepped its boundaries by implementing the new regulations on ISPs and that Congress would need to formally classify companies like Verizon and Comcast as “common carriers” if it believed the FCC should have the same ability to regulate ISPs as it does telecommunications providers. source
16:16 // 9 months ago
September 9, 2013
16:16 // 1 year ago
July 30, 2013

More on net neutrality

antigovernmentextremist says: Wth is a local monopoly? Do you know what net neutrality is? And please tell me what about a government regulation is conducive to free enterprise?

One thing the internet does NOT need is a central planner. Net neutrality is the solution to a non-existent problem.

» SFB says: I don’t know about you, but when I say “local monopoly,” I mean the fact that many cities only have one internet provider, which means those providers can hold an inordinate amount of control on how we use our connection. The result is that those internet providers can do stuff like this. Which is, in fact, an existent problem. What’s net neutrality? It’s when corporate entities can’t do stuff like that— Ernie @ SFB

(Source: poorrichardsnews)

16:42 // 1 year ago
16:26 // 1 year ago
January 18, 2013
"Was the prosecution of Mr. Swartz in any way retaliation for his exercise of his rights as a citizen under the Freedom of Information Act?" Republican Senator John Cornyn has sent a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder with some lengthy questions surrounding the lead up to Aaron Swartz’s death. Cornyn asks whether it was “the intention of the U.S. Attorney and/or her subordinates to ‘make an example’ of Mr. Swartz by prosecuting him,” and requests details as to what, if any, reviews the US attorney’s office carried out prior to Swartz’s prosecution. Whether anything will come of this is impossible to say, but it’s nice that someone in power is asking these questions (Photo credit: AP). source 

"Was the prosecution of Mr. Swartz in any way retaliation for his exercise of his rights as a citizen under the Freedom of Information Act?" Republican Senator John Cornyn has sent a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder with some lengthy questions surrounding the lead up to Aaron Swartz’s death. Cornyn asks whether it was “the intention of the U.S. Attorney and/or her subordinates to ‘make an example’ of Mr. Swartz by prosecuting him,” and requests details as to what, if any, reviews the US attorney’s office carried out prior to Swartz’s prosecution. Whether anything will come of this is impossible to say, but it’s nice that someone in power is asking these questions (Photo credit: AP)source 

18:41 // 1 year ago