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February 9, 2013
hypervocal:

SAMESIES! Exact pic shows up on front pages of FOUR major newspapers today. More details here.

Well, not the exact pic. Apparently storm coverage on its own is just too blasé for the folks at the New York Post these days. Also, setting aside whether this storm should even have a name (we cry foul), the shark isn’t Nemo. Nemo biting – likely not a problem.

hypervocal:

SAMESIES! Exact pic shows up on front pages of FOUR major newspapers today. More details here.

Well, not the exact pic. Apparently storm coverage on its own is just too blasé for the folks at the New York Post these days. Also, setting aside whether this storm should even have a name (we cry foul), the shark isn’t Nemo. Nemo biting – likely not a problem.

13:45 // 1 year ago
February 8, 2013
Gawker’s Max Read on why you shouldn’t call this storm battering the East Coast Nemo:

Yes: last year The Weather Channel—which owns Weather.com, Weather Underground, and a host of other weather-related sites—announced it would begin naming winter storms too. That is its official list of names, as packaged in its official, attractive graphic.
The truth is there is very little attempt being made to hide the fact that this is a money play. In case the inclusion of “Draco” and “Nemo” (just some Greek and Roman names, nothing to do with any recent children’s movies, don’t worry) and “Gandolf” (the “Bert Sampson” of fantasy names) didn’t tip you off, the announcement itself makes it clear that this is about punching up the weather story: “A storm with a name takes on a personality all its own,” writes Tom Niziol. Such “personality,” he claims “adds to awareness.”
Awareness! Of course, awareness. It’s true that if everyone involved in risk and emergency communication—management agencies, local governments, and private news outlets—can agree on a name, it might help emphasize and direct storm news and information.

Cable networks: Where they throw out the official rule book in the name of ratings and hope everyone else plays along.

Gawker’s Max Read on why you shouldn’t call this storm battering the East Coast Nemo:

Yes: last year The Weather Channel—which owns Weather.com, Weather Underground, and a host of other weather-related sites—announced it would begin naming winter storms too. That is its official list of names, as packaged in its official, attractive graphic.

The truth is there is very little attempt being made to hide the fact that this is a money play. In case the inclusion of “Draco” and “Nemo” (just some Greek and Roman names, nothing to do with any recent children’s movies, don’t worry) and “Gandolf” (the “Bert Sampson” of fantasy names) didn’t tip you off, the announcement itself makes it clear that this is about punching up the weather story: “A storm with a name takes on a personality all its own,” writes Tom Niziol. Such “personality,” he claims “adds to awareness.”

Awareness! Of course, awareness. It’s true that if everyone involved in risk and emergency communication—management agencies, local governments, and private news outlets—can agree on a name, it might help emphasize and direct storm news and information.

Cable networks: Where they throw out the official rule book in the name of ratings and hope everyone else plays along.

21:46 // 1 year ago