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November 20, 2013
15:14 // 4 months ago
May 28, 2013
Such offensive epithets would no doubt draw wide-spread disapproval among the NFL’s fan base. Yet the national coverage of Washington’s NFL football team profits from a term that is equally disparaging to Native Americans.
A letter, signed by ten members of Congress, asking Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder to change the team’s name, saying it’s a derogatory term towards Native Americans. The team has repeatedly said that they do not consider the name offensive, and have no plans to change the name. Polling on the football team’s name favors keeping it in place. The effort was led by Rep. Eni F.H. Faleomavaega, the congressman for the American Samoa.
17:43 // 10 months ago
April 30, 2013
District residents and their elected representatives should not tolerate commercial or other use of derogatory terminology relating to any people’s racial identity, or which dishonors any person’s race, or which dishonors the name Washington. Washington’s name has been dishonored by association with the word ‘Redskins.’ Because it is well known in America and in nations afar that American Indians have experienced utmost suffering and disrespect over the years.
A non-binding resolution by Washington D.C. Council member David Grosso • Arguing in favor of changing the name of the Washington D.C. NFL team, from the “Redskins,” to a less offensive one (Grosso himself suggests Redtails, a reference to the Tuskegee Airmen of World War II, which is undeniably pretty catchy). The controversy over the team’s name is not especially new, but as years continue to slide by, it is undeniably startling to see a professional sports team bearing such an overt racial slur as its name, as well as its merchandising brand. One person not so down for a change? Washington quarterback Robert Griffin III, who tweeted his displeasure at the discussion: “In a land of freedom we are held hostage by the tyranny of political correctness.” source
19:07 // 11 months ago
February 27, 2013
Finally, Congress will reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act: The legislation, dreamed up and championed in 1994 by then-Senator Joe Biden, died in the House last year when the Republican leadership refused to put it to a vote (it had already passed the Senate). The problem, if you want to put it that way, was that Senate Democrats had modified the legislation to add protections for LGBT women, Native Americans and undocumented immigrants. John Boehner and company objected to these additions so strongly that they refused to let the House vote on it, despite indications that it would pass if they did. Today, Boehner relented, and will allow the House to vote on the bill. It’s expected to pass and will likely land on the President’s desk at the end of the week. (Photo: Getty images) source

Finally, Congress will reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act: The legislation, dreamed up and championed in 1994 by then-Senator Joe Biden, died in the House last year when the Republican leadership refused to put it to a vote (it had already passed the Senate). The problem, if you want to put it that way, was that Senate Democrats had modified the legislation to add protections for LGBT women, Native Americans and undocumented immigrants. John Boehner and company objected to these additions so strongly that they refused to let the House vote on it, despite indications that it would pass if they did. Today, Boehner relented, and will allow the House to vote on the bill. It’s expected to pass and will likely land on the President’s desk at the end of the week. (Photo: Getty images) source

18:02 // 1 year ago
February 6, 2013

soupsoup:

Native American tells anti-immigration protesters “You’re all f***ing illegal”

Epic protest, complete with stroller and baby. (warning: swears)

EDIT: This version was removed. The original is here, though.

(via brooklynmutt)

14:40 // 1 year ago
October 2, 2012
washingtoncitypaper:

neighborhoodr-washingtondc:

Washington City Paper Editor in Chief Mike Madden wants you to help rename our hometown football team for reasons I hope are obvious to you. Personally, I’m also of the opinion that Washington should part with the name. Submit your ideas to WCP, and if your submission is good enough, the paper’s own art department will draw up a logo!
Madden is also promising to use the winning submission as the City Paper’s stand-in for all future references to the team that hails from Landover.

We were up to around 300 submissions when I checked them last night. Keep ‘em coming.

Related to our post from earlier.

washingtoncitypaper:

neighborhoodr-washingtondc:

Washington City Paper Editor in Chief Mike Madden wants you to help rename our hometown football team for reasons I hope are obvious to you. Personally, I’m also of the opinion that Washington should part with the name. Submit your ideas to WCP, and if your submission is good enough, the paper’s own art department will draw up a logo!

Madden is also promising to use the winning submission as the City Paper’s stand-in for all future references to the team that hails from Landover.

We were up to around 300 submissions when I checked them last night. Keep ‘em coming.

Related to our post from earlier.

9:48 // 1 year ago
June 19, 2012
This gets us back to the principle that the government must pay us what we are entitled to.
Ramah Navajo Chapter President Rodger Martinez • Discussing the Supreme Court’s decision on Monday to force the government to pay back Native American tribes for money they spent on federal programs. Back in 2000, Congress allocated a $1.6 billion payback to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, but Congress had capped paybacks, so only $120.2 million has been paid back so far. ”We stressed that the government’s obligation to pay contract support costs should be treated as an ordinary contract promise,” Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote in her majority ruling, released Monday.
10:07 // 1 year ago
April 28, 2012
I will examine the situation of the American Indian/Native American, Alaska Native and Hawaiian peoples against the background of the United States’ endorsement of the UN declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples. My visit aims at assessing how the standards of the declaration are reflected in US law and policy, and identifying needed reforms and good practices.
James Anaya, UN special rapporteur on indigenous peoples • Discussing his role leading the UN’s investigation on the conditions of living for the 2.7 million Native Americans in the United States today. As he alludes to, this includes native Hawaiian and Alaskan populations, as well. Ayana, a professor of human rights at the University of Arizona, will visit Washington D.C., Arizona, South Dakota, Alaska, Oregon and Oklahoma, after which he’ll present his findings at the next session of the UN’s human rights council. The declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples which he mentions was signed by the U.S. In 2010 - opening for fair international debate just how well these groups are being served in modern America. source (viafollow)
19:33 // 1 year ago