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December 8, 2012

Egyptian President Morsi plans to amend controversial decree

  • then Freshly-elected Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, in a move that inflamed massive protest and civil unrest throughout his state, issued a decree affording himself complete extralegal authority, pending a new constitution. The drafting of the constitutional proposal in subsequent days was carried out by a largely Islamist committee, which drew criticism for the removal of secular and Christian opposition from the body before it approved the draft.
  • now After the weeks of intense opposition, which has even spilled into violence, Morsi is planning to amend his initial decree — as clear a sign as any that he views the opposition’s backlash as a major, and perhaps unsustainable political risk. The Prime Minister, Hisham Qandil, told Egyptian television that the amended decree could be released by tomorrow, and that Morsi is open to talks with the opposition on postponing a December 15th vote scheduled on that controversial constitution draft. source 
17:44 // 1 year ago
December 4, 2012

Protests against Morsi grow around presidential palace

  • 100,000+protesters gathered outside the Egyptian presidential palace in Cairo today, in opposition to President Mohammad Morsi’s recent assertion of his own extralegal authority. There was some conflict, as well — the police deployed teargas after protesters pushed through a barricade surrounding the perimeter, but no attempt was made to breach the palace walls. source
17:56 // 1 year ago
November 27, 2012
thepeoplesrecord:

This is Tahrir Square in Cairo right now: occupied, lively & packed with protesters. 
Anti-Morsi demonstrators filled the Square last night after a decree issued on Thursday expanded his powers and shielded his decisions from any sort of judicial review until the election of a new parliament expected in the first half of 2013.
“We don’t want a dictatorship again. The Mubarak regime was a dictatorship. We had a revolution to have justice and freedom,” 32-year-old Ahmed Husseini said in Cairo.
Click here to watch a livestream of Tahrir.

Definitely a live-stream to keep bookmarked in the days and weeks to come. It seems a safe bet these protests will continue, until such a time as Morsi clarifies his intentions, or cedes back the extralegal authority he’s claimed for himself.

thepeoplesrecord:

This is Tahrir Square in Cairo right now: occupied, lively & packed with protesters. 

Anti-Morsi demonstrators filled the Square last night after a decree issued on Thursday expanded his powers and shielded his decisions from any sort of judicial review until the election of a new parliament expected in the first half of 2013.

“We don’t want a dictatorship again. The Mubarak regime was a dictatorship. We had a revolution to have justice and freedom,” 32-year-old Ahmed Husseini said in Cairo.

Click here to watch a livestream of Tahrir.

Definitely a live-stream to keep bookmarked in the days and weeks to come. It seems a safe bet these protests will continue, until such a time as Morsi clarifies his intentions, or cedes back the extralegal authority he’s claimed for himself.

20:26 // 1 year ago
November 24, 2012

haaretz:

Egyptians take to the streets to protest against President Mohammed Morsi

The protest spirit is alive and pulsing as ever in Egypt, where President Morsi’s recent decree granting himself inordinate power above and beyond the limits of the judiciary has sparked ferocious discontent.

14:18 // 1 year ago