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March 30, 2013
Dr. Bassem Youssef, the heart-surgeon turned satirist who hosts popular Egyptian TV show “ElBernameg” (“The Program”) has been issued an arrest warrant by Egypt’s state prosecutor, for insulting both President Mohammed Morsi and Islam. Youssef, often referred to as Egypt’s Jon Stewart (he visited The Daily Show last year, about which he is clearly proud — the above photo is his Twitter avatar), has been the target of numerous legal challenges to his public mockeries and criticisms of Egypt’s ruling powers, specifically Morsi and his party, the Muslim Brotherhood. Challenges to free speech and dissent which, frankly, validate his criticisms. Youssef tweeted that he’d be turning himself in on Sunday, “unless they kindly send a police van today and save me the transportation hassle.” source

Dr. Bassem Youssef, the heart-surgeon turned satirist who hosts popular Egyptian TV show “ElBernameg” (“The Program”) has been issued an arrest warrant by Egypt’s state prosecutor, for insulting both President Mohammed Morsi and Islam. Youssef, often referred to as Egypt’s Jon Stewart (he visited The Daily Show last year, about which he is clearly proud — the above photo is his Twitter avatar), has been the target of numerous legal challenges to his public mockeries and criticisms of Egypt’s ruling powers, specifically Morsi and his party, the Muslim Brotherhood. Challenges to free speech and dissent which, frankly, validate his criticisms. Youssef tweeted that he’d be turning himself in on Sunday, “unless they kindly send a police van today and save me the transportation hassle.” source

15:53 // 1 year ago
February 2, 2013
csmonitor:

Week In Review: Upheaval in EgyptBy Ariel Zirulnick, Staff writer
Unrest spread to provinces along the Suez Canal, Egypt’s economically and strategically critical waterway, prompted by locals’ anger over a court verdict passed down on Jan. 25. Residents poured into the streets in protest and clashed with police after 21 localmen were sentenced to death for their role in last year’s deadly soccer riots.
Police were completely overwhelmed by the angry crowds, and President Mohamed Morsi had to call the Egyptian Army out on the streets and declare a state of emergency. 
As Kristen Chick reported, the protests themselves were prompted by the court verdict, but long-simmering anger about their alienation from Cairo was just waiting to be touched off. 

But in the city, where initial wire reports indicated that as many as 47 people were killed and more than 1,000 injured since Jan. 26, the anger and sense of alienation from the rest of Egypt is ferocious. As anger at Mr. Morsi burns hotter with each death, Port Said exemplifies the lack of trust in state institutions that is present not just here but in much of Egypt, and the challenge Morsi faces in reasserting authority and establishing security in that environment. 
More reading on Egypt: 
Egyptians work to reclaim a Tahrir tainted by sexual assault
Egypt shudders, with leadership nowhere in sight
As Egyptians flout curfew, Army warns of ‘collapse’
Photo: Egyptians flee tear gas fired by security forces during an anti-President Mohammed Morsi protest in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Friday. Photo by: Amr Nabil/AP 


The court verdict that set off the deadly fracas last week was a series of 21 death sentences handed down for people involved in the deadly Port Said soccer riot of last year.

csmonitor:

Week In Review: Upheaval in Egypt
By Staff writer

Unrest spread to provinces along the Suez Canal, Egypt’s economically and strategically critical waterway, prompted by locals’ anger over a court verdict passed down on Jan. 25. Residents poured into the streets in protest and clashed with police after 21 localmen were sentenced to death for their role in last year’s deadly soccer riots.

Police were completely overwhelmed by the angry crowds, and President Mohamed Morsi had to call the Egyptian Army out on the streets and declare a state of emergency. 

As Kristen Chick reported, the protests themselves were prompted by the court verdict, but long-simmering anger about their alienation from Cairo was just waiting to be touched off. 

But in the city, where initial wire reports indicated that as many as 47 people were killed and more than 1,000 injured since Jan. 26, the anger and sense of alienation from the rest of Egypt is ferocious. As anger at Mr. Morsi burns hotter with each death, Port Said exemplifies the lack of trust in state institutions that is present not just here but in much of Egypt, and the challenge Morsi faces in reasserting authority and establishing security in that environment. 

More reading on Egypt: 

Egyptians work to reclaim a Tahrir tainted by sexual assault

Egypt shudders, with leadership nowhere in sight

As Egyptians flout curfew, Army warns of ‘collapse’

Photo: Egyptians flee tear gas fired by security forces during an anti-President Mohammed Morsi protest in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Friday. Photo by: Amr Nabil/AP 

The court verdict that set off the deadly fracas last week was a series of 21 death sentences handed down for people involved in the deadly Port Said soccer riot of last year.

13:17 // 1 year ago
November 23, 2012
A year after Hosni Mubarak’s fall, new round of protests in Egypt: Tear gas filled the streets and 15 were injured in protests after President Mohammed Morsi issued a decree yesterday greatly expanding his own power. The decree shields any of the president’s decisions from legal challenge until a new parliament is elected; protects the Islamist-dominated assembly, which is in the process of crafting a new constitution for the country, from being dissolved; and calls for retrials of Hosni Mubarak and other members of the old guard. 18 liberal and Christain members of the aforementioned assembly recently withdrew from the process, claiming that their input wasn’t being addressed; Morsi’s claims that his decree will only be in effect until the new constitution is drafted. Both pro- and anti-Morsi protesters clashed in Egyptian streets today, numbering in the thousands. source [1] [2] [3] (Photo credit: Reuters)

A year after Hosni Mubarak’s fall, new round of protests in Egypt: Tear gas filled the streets and 15 were injured in protests after President Mohammed Morsi issued a decree yesterday greatly expanding his own power. The decree shields any of the president’s decisions from legal challenge until a new parliament is elected; protects the Islamist-dominated assembly, which is in the process of crafting a new constitution for the country, from being dissolved; and calls for retrials of Hosni Mubarak and other members of the old guard. 18 liberal and Christain members of the aforementioned assembly recently withdrew from the process, claiming that their input wasn’t being addressed; Morsi’s claims that his decree will only be in effect until the new constitution is drafted. Both pro- and anti-Morsi protesters clashed in Egyptian streets today, numbering in the thousands. source [1] [2] [3] (Photo credit: Reuters)

15:18 // 1 year ago
November 21, 2012
reuters:

Egypt announced on Wednesday that a ceasefire had been reached to end the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, starting later in the day.
Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr made the announcement in a joint news conference with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. The ceasefire would come into effect at 15:00 EDT, said Amr, whose country has been at the heart of efforts to broker an end to the conflict.
…

Here are the details of the agreement. This is a big development not only for Israel and Gaza, but post-revolutionary Egypt as well. If the ceasefire holds, it will be a huge win for President Mohammed Morsi, and he’ll reap lots of credit for helping broker the agreement.

reuters:

Egypt announced on Wednesday that a ceasefire had been reached to end the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, starting later in the day.

Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr made the announcement in a joint news conference with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. The ceasefire would come into effect at 15:00 EDT, said Amr, whose country has been at the heart of efforts to broker an end to the conflict.

Here are the details of the agreement. This is a big development not only for Israel and Gaza, but post-revolutionary Egypt as well. If the ceasefire holds, it will be a huge win for President Mohammed Morsi, and he’ll reap lots of credit for helping broker the agreement.

14:06 // 1 year ago
July 9, 2012

Mohammed Morsi’s first big battle: Egypt’s fight over parliament

  • cause A few weeks ago, the Egyptian Supreme Court ruled that parliament had to be dissolved because a number of members ran as independents, despite being members of a political party.
  • reaction This decision, which happened just before Mohammed Morsi won his election, was controversial. Morsi’s response? He told parliament to go back to work on Tuesday.
  • rebuttal Egypt’s high court wasn’t happy about this; after a meeting on Monday, emphasized that their decision was “final and not subject to appeal” and that new elections must take place. source

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9:45 // 2 years ago
June 24, 2012
Egyptian election results bring cheers of joy, waves of worry
Egypt reacts to elections: Supporters of Mohammed Morsi celebrated in Tahrir Square as election results were read over loudspeakers. “We’re finally going to be respected, we’ve been oppressed for too long,” said, Adham Lotfy, a 28-year-old owner of a parking garage. However, not everyone is as ecstatic as members of the Muslim Brotherhood. ”I’m very sceptical, and I fear what is still to be done,” said an anonymous woman to Al Jazeera reporter, Evan Hill. source
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Egypt reacts to elections: Supporters of Mohammed Morsi celebrated in Tahrir Square as election results were read over loudspeakers. “We’re finally going to be respected, we’ve been oppressed for too long,” said, Adham Lotfy, a 28-year-old owner of a parking garage. However, not everyone is as ecstatic as members of the Muslim Brotherhood. ”I’m very sceptical, and I fear what is still to be done,” said an anonymous woman to Al Jazeera reporter, Evan Hill. source

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20:40 // 2 years ago
May 25, 2012
Little-known to the wider public, Morsi is a famously boring speaker who reduces Egyptian journalists to teeth-gnashing frustration as he rarely says anything remotely quotable. He was ridiculed as a ‘spare’ after Shater’s disqualification, and some people waved tyres at his rallies to emphasise the point. But the Brotherhood’s well-oiled machine seems to matter more than his underwhelming personality.
Guardian reporter Ian Black • Writing about Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood’s lead candidate for Egyptian president. Black’s point? Morsi, usually a behind the scenes guy, is in a good position to win because his party is a well-oiled machine. Morsi is currently leading in the results, with either Ahmed Shafiq (a former premier under Hosni Mubarak) or Hamdeen Sabbahi (a Nasserist) his likely opponent in a runoff election.
11:50 // 2 years ago