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December 21, 2013
19:48 // 9 months ago
September 9, 2013

Egyptian military confirms plans to battle militants in Sinai desert

  • Last Week Islamic militants, with ties to groups stationed in uncontrolled areas of the northern Sinai desert, attempted to bomb a car carrying interim Egyptian Interior Minister Mohammed Ibrahim while he was traveling through the Cairo. Ibrahim survived, but dozens were injured in the attack.
  • This Week Egypt’s Supreme Council of the Armed Forces announced plans for a full-scale offensive aimed at exerting government control over the entirety of the Sinai. The decision follows not only last week’s suicide bombing, but numerous kidnappings and killings which followed the deposing of former Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi. source
15:14 // 1 year ago
August 14, 2013
We have repeatedly called on the Egyptian military and security forces to show restraint, and for the government to respect the universal rights of its citizens, just as we have urged protesters to demonstrate peacefully. Violence will only make it more difficult to move Egypt forward on a path to lasting stability and democracy, and runs directly counter to the pledges by the interim government to pursue reconciliation.
White House spokesman Josh Earnest • Condemning this morning’s violent crackdowns throughout Egypt, on behalf of the Obama Administration, following reports that more than 140 people were killed when Egyptian military forces forcibly removed demonstrators from their camps in Cairo and elsewhere. The vast majority of those killed are believed to be supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and/or former president Mohamed Morsi, many of whom did not believe the military would ever resort to the violence which was carried out on Wednesday. Egypt’s interim vice president, Mohamed ElBaradei, resigned from his post on Wednesday, in response to the violent crackdown by Egypt’s military. source
14:54 // 1 year ago

wired:

fotojournalismus:

More pictures from Egypt today : 

1. An Egyptian security forces’ armoured vehicle drives amidst remains of a protest camp by supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi and members of the Muslim Brotherhood after a crackdown on August 14, 2013 near Cairo’s Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque. (Mahmoud Khaled/AFP/Getty Images)

2. An injured Egyptian youth is seen at a makeshift hospital during clashes between supporters of Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi and police in Cairo on August 14, as security forces backed by bulldozers moved in on two huge pro-Morsi protest camps, launching a long-threatened crackdown that left dozens dead. (Mosaab El-shamy/AFP/Getty Images)

3. A supporter of Mohammed Morsi holds his children tight as security forces move in to disperse protesters in a huge camp in Cairo’s Al-Nahda square on Aug. 14, 2013. (Engy Imad/AFP/Getty Images)

4. A man grieves as he looks at one of many bodies laid out in a make shift morgue after Egyptian security forces stormed two huge protest camps at the Rabaa al-Adawiya and Al-Nahda squares where supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi were camped, in Cairo, on August 14, 2013. (Mosaab El-shamy/AFP/Getty Images)

5. Female supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi gather stones during clashes with police in Cairo on August 14, 2013. (Mosaab El-shamy/AFP/Getty Images)

6. Riot police fire tear gas during clashes with members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi, around Cairo University and Nahdet Misr Square, where they are camping in Giza, south of Cairo August 14, 2013. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)

7. Egyptian riot police arrest a demonstrator during clashes as security forces backed by bulldozers moved in on two huge protest camps of supporters of Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi, launching a long-threatened crackdown that left dozens dead on August 14, 2013. (Hassan Mohamed/AFP/Getty Images)

8. A supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood and Egypt’s ousted president Mohamed Morsi gestures during clashes with police in Cairo on August 14, 2013. (Mosaab El-shamy/AFP/Getty Images)

9. An Egyptian security force kicks a supporter of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi as they clear a sit-in camp set up near Cairo University in Cairo’s Giza district, Egypt, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013. (AP Photo/Hussein Tallal)

10. Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi take cover from Egyptian security forces fire during clashes in Rabaah Al-Adawiya in Cairo’s Nasr City district, Egypt, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)

Today, in Egypt.

Also of note: Mohamed ElBaradei, the highly-regarded vice president of the country who won a Nobel Peace Prize for his nuclear regulatory efforts, resigned in protest today. From his resignation letter:

I saw that there were peaceful ways to end this clash in society; there were proposed and acceptable solutions for beginnings that would take us to national consensus.

It has become difficult for me to continue bearing responsibility for decisions that I do not agree with and whose consequences I fear. I cannot bear the responsibility for one drop of blood.

(via bobbycaputo)

13:58 // 1 year ago
August 12, 2013
15:01 // 1 year ago
July 22, 2013
What is happening to President Morsi is a violation of his rights by all measures. Our father is held incommunicado which contravenes the most basic of human rights conventions.
Osama Morsi • Criticizing the Egyptian army in statement which the eldest son of former Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi also used to reveal that the deposed politician’s family plans to take legal action against the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces in international courts. Mohamed Morsi remains incarcerated this week, and has been since he refused to step down from his office on July 3. source
17:47 // 1 year ago
July 5, 2013

Death toll rises in wake of Egyptian coup

30 killed in Egypt today as protests over President Morsi’s ouster flare up around the country. Muslim Brotherhood supporters are calling today the “Friday of Rage,” and over 10,000 have taken to the streets to protest the President’s removal two days ago by the military. The National Salvation front, which supported Morsi’s overthrow, has called for counter-protests this Sunday. source

20:34 // 1 year ago
July 3, 2013

The Egyptian military coup: A breakdown of where the major players stand

After Egypt’s Armed Forces General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi announced the ouster of President Mohmed Morsi on Wednesday, developments came in rapidly. Among the things you should know, below:

  • the military The Egyptian Army, as revealed in the speech this evening, is putting to action a couple of things: The dissolving of the current constitution (and the reworking of its hot-messes of highly controversial amendments), early presidential elections (a victory for the opposition, which had asked Morsi for this) and with the head of the High Constitutional Court as interim president. They will also continue on with the planned parliamentary elections, create a constitutional committee and more.
  • the new guy Adly Mansour from the High Constitutional Court is set to be sworn in as the temporary president on Thursday. He will be holding the position until a new president is elected in the early elections, which have yet to be assigned a date as of now. Want to learn more? Well, you could always ask Siri.
  • the media Shortly after the military speech, the Army shut down a couple of television news networks in Egypt, all which have Islamist connections, and have reportedly incited violence. They include Al Jazeera and a few others. Their crime? Being Islamist.
  • the protesters Gunshots and birdshot went off after the announcement of Morsi’s overthrowing. 14 were reported dead in fights between pro and anti Morsi demonstrators. (Something to watch for: There has been talk of civil war, as the Muslim Brotherhood continues their violent threats.)
  • the U.S. response In a statement on the unrest, President Barack Obama had this to say: ”Since the current unrest in Egypt began, we have called on all parties to work together to address the legitimate grievances of the Egyptian people, in accordance with the democratic process, and without recourse to violence or the use of force. […] An honest, capable and representative government is what ordinary Egyptians seek and what they deserve.”
  • oh … and Morsi Almost forgot about him. He’s under house arrest.
22:56 // 1 year ago
brooklynmutt:

@guardiannews front page, Thursday 4 July: Egypt’s second revolution

brooklynmutt:

@guardiannews front page, Thursday 4 July: Egypt’s second revolution

17:23 // 1 year ago
michaelhayes:

Coup in Egypt!

Such a great animated gif of a big story.

michaelhayes:

Coup in Egypt!

Such a great animated gif of a big story.

(via bobbycaputo)

16:50 // 1 year ago