The coolest place on the internet, according to this tagline.
AskArchiveFAQ

June 18, 2013
rollingstone:

Moby is offering non-profit filmmakers his entire catalog of music, for free.

Back in the ’70s and ’80s, novelist Stephen King started doing something similar, giving budding filmmakers the rights to his short stories for a dollar. While most of the people who created films based on King’s short stories didn’t become famous, one did: Frank Darabont, the guy who directed the “The Shawshank Redemption” and “The Green Mile”—both films based on King stories. Oh, and Darabont created a little series you might have heard of called “The Walking Dead.”

rollingstone:

Moby is offering non-profit filmmakers his entire catalog of music, for free.

Back in the ’70s and ’80s, novelist Stephen King started doing something similar, giving budding filmmakers the rights to his short stories for a dollar. While most of the people who created films based on King’s short stories didn’t become famous, one did: Frank Darabont, the guy who directed the “The Shawshank Redemption” and “The Green Mile”—both films based on King stories. Oh, and Darabont created a little series you might have heard of called “The Walking Dead.”

13:13 // 10 months ago
July 30, 2011

3 a.m. video du jour: Kurt Loder, circa 1995, explaining the internet to the plebes watching MTV News. Unlike this classic clip of the Today Show anchors acting utterly confused about the Internet, Loder seems to know what he’s talking about pretty well. Fun fact: MTV.com has an interesting pre-Web history that involved former VJ Adam Curry of all people buying the domain name before MTV knew that owning this domain name was important. (Also, on a side note: Son Volt, Moby with HAIR, Better Than Ezra’s “Good,” Coolio, virtual reality, and “The Net”-era Sandra Bullock. Wow, time machine.)

3:32 // 2 years ago
February 12, 2011
Researchers: We just found a wrecked ship tied to “Moby Dick”!
See that down there? That decayed jar of ginger may be a key piece of the Moby Dick puzzle deep in the ocean for three centuries. The inspiration for Herman Melville’s book (and, indirectly Herman Melville’s great-great-great-grandnephew’s stage name), George Pollard, Jr., was the captain of the ship ”Two Brothers,” a ship that was struck by lightning and sank way back in 1823. (It was Pollard’s second whaling ship to face such an unlucky fate.) The crew was rescued, but the ship reportedly wasn’t found until recently, 600 miles off the coast of Honolulu. If true, this is awesome. (Photo by Greg McFall, NOAA) source
Follow ShortFormBlog

See that down there? That decayed jar of ginger may be a key piece of the Moby Dick puzzle deep in the ocean for three centuries. The inspiration for Herman Melville’s book (and, indirectly Herman Melville’s great-great-great-grandnephew’s stage name), George Pollard, Jr., was the captain of the ship ”Two Brothers,” a ship that was struck by lightning and sank way back in 1823. (It was Pollard’s second whaling ship to face such an unlucky fate.) The crew was rescued, but the ship reportedly wasn’t found until recently, 600 miles off the coast of Honolulu. If true, this is awesome. (Photo by Greg McFall, NOAA) source

Follow ShortFormBlog

18:26 // 3 years ago